Skip navigation

How to record group singing in GarageBand ?

681 Views 7 Replies Latest reply: May 14, 2013 9:05 PM by Edgar RSS
RyanManUtd Level 1 Level 1 (85 points)
Currently Being Moderated
Apr 24, 2013 8:50 AM

Hi all experts,

 

I am now stuck with a technical problem.

 

I am helping a school to produce a video & record a song, something like "We are the World". The school has rope in about 40 students

 

I have an focusrite Spphire 56 audio interface & it can connect up to 8 mics. They are singing against a karaoke music. And the audio interface have 8 headphone connections (one for each mic)

 

The song started with some individual singing, that is not a problem.

 

The problem I am having (and still thiking how to solve) is when the group is singing the chorus part. I intend to separate the 40 students into groups of 5 persons in each mic.

 

The problem is that in each mic, there is only one headphone available. If one person wearing the headphone, the rest of the 4 person will not have a headphone & thus they will not be able to hear the karaoke music. So, how do they know when to start singing and to sing to sync with the karaoke music ?

 

Any ideas ?

 

Thanks

15.4, Mac OS X (10.6.8), 27" iMac - 4GB RAM, 1TB HDD, 1GB ATI Radeon HD, i5 QuadCore
  • Edgar Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 24, 2013 11:05 AM (in response to RyanManUtd)

    First of all, you don't give headphones to the choir, especially not with 40 members. Get the headphones to the conductor and maybe one or two lead singers.

    Play the playback over speakers. You have to find the balance how loud you can set the speakers. Use directional mics and position the speaker carefully so they are directed into the dead zone of a cardiod mic.

     

    Sometimes in professional studios where you have to play the playback into the room with speakers, you can record the song on more time on a separate track just run the speaker and tell the choir to be quiet. Then you you mix that signal phase reversed in order to cancel out the acoustic playback. It is a little bit tricky but worth a shot.

     

    Good luck

     

    Hope that helps

     

    Edgar Rothermich

    http://DingDingMusic.com/Manuals

    'I may receive some form of compensation, financial or otherwise, from my recommendation or link.'

  • Keith Barkley Level 5 Level 5 (5,140 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 10:37 AM (in response to RyanManUtd)

    RyanManUtd wrote:

     

     

    I think my mic, the graph is shape of a heart. Since the shape of the graph for my mic is a heart shape, if I were to place the speaker behind away from the mic, the mic should pick up the sound from the speaker, right ?

     

     

    Thanks

    The heart shaped pattern means you *do* have a cardioid mic.

  • Christoph Drösser Level 6 Level 6 (11,270 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 9:05 AM (in response to RyanManUtd)

    Sorry, dont quite get what you mean here.

     

    Okay, I'll try to explain that: an audio signal is like a mathematical curve, wiggling up and down. To "phase reverse" that signal means you flip the curve across the x axis, reversing plus and minus (all audio editors like Audacity or Sound Studio have a menu command for that.) To the ear, it will still sound the same if you play it by itself. But if you put the original and the phase reversed audio on two tracks, and they are perfectly aligned, the two waves will exactly cancel each other out, and the result is silence. So if you put the recording of the singing with the playback on one track and the phase reversed playback on another, the hope is that the playback will be cancelled out and only the singing remains. As Edgar said, it might be tricky to get everyhing aligned exactly (it's a matter of milliseconds), but it should work.

  • Edgar Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 4:43 PM (in response to RyanManUtd)

    It seems your questions alreadyhave been answered by other forum members.

     

    About the mic. Just google around the term "directional" microphone. If you are using mics, this will help you to understand the technology a little bit better and lets you use it better in your setup. You don't have to go into the details how a condenser mic works and all that, just a few principles. It's not that complicated.

     

    About the speaker position. Christoph explained it very good. You have to be sure to understand the underlying technology before trying it. It is possible to some degree but very difficult.

  • Edgar Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 9:05 PM (in response to RyanManUtd)

    RyanManUtd wrote:

     

    Since my mic is a cardiod mic, it should only pick out the sound/voice from the singer (which is in front of the mic) and should not pick up the sound from the speakers since the speakers a placed far away at the back of the mic. Is this assumption correct ?

     

     

    In theory yes, BUT. Even if you place the speaker exaclty 180 degrees away from the front of the mic, its sound will stil reach the mic through reflections of the room. In practice you can't eliminate the "bleeding" of the speaker into the mic, you can only minimize the effect by playing with the position and acoustic of the room.

    Good luck

     

    Hope that helps

     

    Edgar Rothermich

    http://DingDingMusic.com/Manuals

    'I may receive some form of compensation, financial or otherwise, from my recommendation or link.'

Actions

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Legend

  • This solved my question - 10 points
  • This helped me - 5 points
This site contains user submitted content, comments and opinions and is for informational purposes only. Apple disclaims any and all liability for the acts, omissions and conduct of any third parties in connection with or related to your use of the site. All postings and use of the content on this site are subject to the Apple Support Communities Terms of Use.