8 Replies Latest reply: May 7, 2013 4:39 PM by rccharles
MaximoG Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I have an old Mac G3 from which I need to pull images. They would be large .jpgs and .tiffs so using the floppy is unfeasible. At this point, IT won't let me network it (which would solve this, obviously). Short of locating an old zip drive (one 25 pin IDE connection available in back), are there any other alternatives? I've looked at removing and docking the hard drive, but that seems to be available only if I had a USB port on the system... I really need the HD to USB to external interface, but to still connect the HD to the Mac. Thanks. MG


PowerMac, G3
  • 1. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    Allan Jones Level 7 Level 7 (30,435 points)

    The majority of Beige G3s had ATA hard drives. If yours is ATA, you can remove the drive and use this device:

     

    http://eshop.macsales.com/item/NewerTech/U3NVSPATA/

     

    to attach the drive to any Mac with USB ports. The device treats a bare drive exactly as if it were in an external enclosure. The adaptor includes a power supply to get power to the drive while it in out of the computer. One of these had saves my bacon a number of times.

  • 2. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    MaximoG Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks, Allan. That looks like what I need, connecting to the HD, with a USB interface to the outside world, which would most likely be a USB thumb drive in my case. Dumb question, but would the thumb drive be visible from the G3 to drag and drop files? Our company is strickly PC and Linux, so I don't have a Mac available to interface with.

  • 3. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    Glen Doggett Level 4 Level 4 (1,795 points)

    The suggestion of using the bare-drive universal cable adapter involves removing the hard drive from the G3, i.e. - open the G3 up disconnect the power cables, disconnect the hard drive cables, take the hard drive out of the G3, rendering the G3 unusable for this operation.

     

    Hook the hard drive that you took out of the G3 to the cable adapter and use the USB connection on another totally different computer to read the files.  There may be some issues with reading the Mac formatted drive on a PC or linux machine, best bet would be to use another Mac.

     

    If the company is strictly PC and linux, then why would you have any essential files stuck on an 15+ year old Mac that remains inaccesible via the other company computers?

  • 4. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    Allan Jones Level 7 Level 7 (30,435 points)

    which would most likely be a USB thumb drive in my case.

     

    Won't work. The USB end of the adaptor must connect to another Mac computer:

  • 5. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    Jeff Level 6 Level 6 (11,195 points)

    "Our company is strickly PC and Linux, so I don't have a Mac available to interface with."

     

    Unless you install a software program like "MacDrive" on one of the PCs so that a Mac-formatted drive is recognized, the adapter mentioned by Allan isn't going to be of much use to you.  Additionally, that type of adapter isn't platform-specific, which means that you can purchase one at a PC store and it would work with PCs and Macs.  I bought/use this one, which is about half the price of the one at Other World Computing.  You referenced the G3's "25 pin IDE connection available in back."  That's a DB-25 SCSI bus port, and although it resembles the parallel port found on the back of older PCs, it's a different/incompatible interface.  A suitable Zip drive would be a SCSI type, not a parallel port type.  If you had access to a SCSI Zip drive (100 MB or 250 MB), you could transfer the files to PC-formatted Zip disks and then use a Zip drive designed for connection to a USB port, to transfer files from the disks to a PC.  Depending on the OS version that the beige G3 is running, you could install a USB PCI card and transfer the files to a flash drive.  Realistically, the G3 should be running OS 9.1 and you'd need to perform a custom installation of the same OS, to install the necessary USB support files.  It just gets more complicated, in terms of the hardware and software upgrades needed to accomplish this.  I'd recommend removing the G3's hard drive and using the USB-to-IDE adapter, which will require a software program on the PC to enable reading the Mac-formatted drive.

  • 6. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    rccharles Level 5 Level 5 (5,360 points)

    You did not say whether or not this machine booted.  Folks have assumed the machine did not boot.

     

    If it does boot,

    1) get a flash drive.  They come formated for the pc.  keep the fat32 format. 8 gig one works fine for me.

    2) put the flash drive in a usb port.

    3) Drag & drop the images to the flash drive.

     

    etc.

     

    got some problem with the flash drive.  reformat on PC xp or mac with dos format. Avoid formating on a newer windows system. 

     

    buy a new 8gig flash drive in a store & you will be fine.

     

    Robert

  • 7. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    Glen Doggett Level 4 Level 4 (1,795 points)

    rccharles wrote: Folks have assumed the machine did not boot...

    2) put the flash drive in a usb port...

    I think most of us were assuming the Beige G3 did not have a PCI USB expansion card upgrade installed.  Beige G3 models have no built-in USB ports, Blue&White models and later have them.

  • 8. Re: Power Mac G3 (beige) Pulling large files w/out network
    rccharles Level 5 Level 5 (5,360 points)

      Forgot that little point about no usb ports

     

    Could try connecting it via a crossover cable to some other computer. Or a regular ethernet cable if the other computer has auto-sensing ports.  Run an ftp server on the other computer. 

     

    find a ethernet hub or router and connect with two cables that way.  Most wifi home routers have multipe ethernet cable ports.

     

    I used fetch on classic:

    http://fetchsoftworks.com/downloads.html

     

    Some version of classic came with a web server.  Could put the files to transport in a web server folder.  You can then use any web browser to download the files.

     

    Robert