14 Replies Latest reply: May 29, 2014 5:19 PM by Michael L. Bingham
to1986 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

Hi all,

 

This is something I have failed to figure out, and may not be a feature, but I was wondering if the Mail app on Mac (Mountain Lion) can access icloud files, for example those created in Pages. When I click on the attachment icon in a new email window and brows files, there is no option for accessing iCloud files. At present each file I want to email, I have to share individually from the Pages app. This is frustrating as if I want to share two files I have to send two emails! Is there a way around this? Am I missing something?


MacBook (13-inch Aluminum Late 2008), OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.3)
  • 1. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    C.J. Bradford Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I agree, it is a weird problem. What I've been using as a workaround is to click the attachment icon and go to either All My Files or search for the document's name in the search bar. If you opened it recently, it should show up. I use TextEdit instead of Pages, though, so I don't know if the programs work differently.

  • 2. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    David Gnotta Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Same here .... very strange omission. This is no way to get us using iCould more. Help us out Apple!

  • 3. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    Luke Christian Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)

    Hate to say it but, apart from enabling you iPad to access your Mac socuments, iCloud has been so poorly designed it really is of limited practical value. It is actually worse than the defunct Mobile Me (iDisk) which at least did hide documents away where they cannot be navigated. You cannot create nested file structures (because iOS cannot cope with them) and yet Apple seems to want to default to iCloud every time you save a new file in Preview... I think it is born out of an obsession with iOS, it simply does not work properly with Mac.

     

    My advice would be to use DropBox. I have found it to be everything iCloud should have been!

    If you follow this link we both get an extra 500MB of online storage free: http://db.tt/CdJ3vcI

  • 4. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    pvonk Level 6 Level 6 (13,685 points)

    Using something like Dropbox is a good idea, because it is a totally different service (with a different objective) than icloud.

  • 5. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    ZoeMacUser Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I could be missing what you're trying to do here, but this is what I do:

     

    In Pages on my Mac I open the document from iCloud.  I chose the Share menu and then one of the choices under "Send via Mail."

     

    I'm not acutally accessing iCloud FROM Mail, but the result is the same in the end.  Hope that helps.

  • 6. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    m0thr4 Level 1 Level 1 (95 points)

    to1986 wrote:

     

    Hi all,

     

    This is something I have failed to figure out, and may not be a feature, but I was wondering if the Mail app on Mac (Mountain Lion) can access icloud files, for example those created in Pages. When I click on the attachment icon in a new email window and brows files, there is no option for accessing iCloud files. At present each file I want to email, I have to share individually from the Pages app. This is frustrating as if I want to share two files I have to send two emails! Is there a way around this? Am I missing something?

     

    You don't have to do any of this.  In the app that has your documents (e.g. Pages) choose Open from the File menu (or cmd + o).  This brings up the iCloud window.  From this window, simply drag the documents you want into the email body.

     

     

    EDIT:  And, if you really must be able to do this by clicking on the attachment icon and browsing Finder, then you can place the Mobile Documents folder into the Finder sidebar. However, this is not how iCloud is meant to be used so I don't know whether you risk breaking anything by doing this.

     

    1.  In Finder choose "Go" from the menu bar, hold the Alt button, and choose "Library". 

    2.  In that folder, find a folder called "Mobile Documents" and drag it to the Finder sidebar

     

    Now, for any program that opens up Finder to load a file, you can browse Mobile Documents.  This folder has sub directories for the various apps that use iCloud, for example, the Pages documents are in com~apple~Pages.

     

    Message was edited by: m0thr4

  • 7. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    m0thr4 Level 1 Level 1 (95 points)

    Luke Christian wrote:

     

    You cannot create nested file structures (because iOS cannot cope with them) and yet Apple seems to want to default to iCloud every time you save a new file in Preview... I think it is born out of an obsession with iOS, it simply does not work properly with Mac.

     

    My advice would be to use DropBox. I have found it to be everything iCloud should have been!

     

    It's not that iOS can't cope with nested structures, it's that Apple are presenting an interface to your files that follows the modern approach of "search, don't organise".

     

    The problem with a UI allowing unlimited nested structures is that as the nesting deepens, individual items become harder to find.  And as soon as you can overcome that problem with a search tool, the value of the nested structure is lost.

     

    Think how irritating it is in Windows that after pressing the "Start" button, then "Programs", you are then presented with a list of software manufacturer names... and it's your job to remember which manufacturer made the application you're trying to find.  Sometimes, clicking on the manufacturer name only reveals yet another set of choices that are not actual application launchers.  As soon as Windows implemented a similar facility to SpotLight, the entire "Start" Menu" became as redundant as it would be in OS X.

     

    I think people have become hung up on nesting as a result of flawed teaching that describes a hierarchical filesystem as being like a filing cabinet.  Hence many of these same people talk about "folders" rather than the correct term "directories" (which I think more accurately describes its purpose).  It's yet another case of computer-related "Stockholm Syndrome", and probably the reason "popular demand" has dictated Microsoft bring their "Start Menu" back to Windows 8.

  • 8. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    Luke Christian Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)

    I understand the principles of your argument, but I think it is misguided to confuse novelty with modernity.

     

    I recognise the difficlty in navigating to files within nested structures, but Finder is just as able to locate the file several levels down in a nested file structure as it is if everything were to be on one level. It is no more or less easy to search by name, tag or content however the files are arranged, it is, however, vastly more troublesome to navigate to a project or contact group when you are faced with an interminable list of hundreds, if not thousands, of file names. To make matters worse, Apple separates files by application, so you if you are in Pages you can only access Pages documents (even though there might be Word documents from, say, a client, that could, potentially, be opened in Pages), or there might be something that you thought you had written in Pages but actually produced in Keynote, or even Numbers, which is simply not visible.

     

    This rather naive approach is driven partly by a somewhat detatched perspective on real world business, a desire to be 'modern', while ignoring the fact that systems often evolve the way people want them to be, and, most importantly, a blind obsession with iOS which dictates that everything must be dumbed-down to work on an iPhone or iPad - even though few of us will ever want to produce spreadsheets or business presentations on our phone... but, in the utopian stratosphere of Cupertino, it is an 'awesome concept' which everyone will 'really love'. In fact iOS users will really love it so much they're going to start getting it free! (behavioural economics would suggest that they are even less likely to use it if it is perceived to have no monetary value).

     

    While I appreciate you desire to be in step with the Apple vision, your observations about 'hierarchical filesystems' rather misses the point. If I had one vast cupboard into which I would throw all my written work, another cupboard into which I would throw anything with numbers and a third containing anything with pictures, even if I had a house elf for each who could magically produce a particular item from their respective cupboard, how could I find those items that didn't fit into a particular category? How could I review everything relating to a particular project or person or practice or client or region? Suddenly the filing cabinet looks like a revolutionary idea!

  • 9. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    C.J. Bradford Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Not to butt into the debate, but I believe there is something here that should be fleshed out. It's not so much a matter of nested or hierarchical or whatever. That all is simply a visual metaphor designed to help users cope with a virtual system of orginization. How I -- at 23 years old -- interpret the metaphor may be vastly different than my middle age father. Personally, I like to have commonly used documents sitting on the desktop, and refuse to use searchlight as long as I can help it. There are people that love to put folders in folders in folders -- or chain directories together -- and those who want everything in a single spot so it is easily searchable. I'm not going to say one approach is right or wrong, because it's all a matter of what makes you most efficient.

     

    All that being said, the thing that ****** me off most about Apple is when they artificially limit the metaphor. The original problem is I want to go into Mail, click add attachment, and reach into the iCloud folder. The fact that I have to search for the document I want or have to launch Mail through Pages/Keynote/Textedit/etc. is insane. The same problem persists throughout OSX. Not being able to move the first window in Mission Control. Not being able to put a folder/document in Launchpad. The complete uselessness of the trackpad. The refusal to list my TV's native resolution. It's crap like this that continue to frustrate me.

     

    The overall problem isn't so much how documents are laid out, or how to find them. Everyone uses their own way to get things done. What is a problem is how Apple breaks the visual metaphor simply because it can. There's no descernable reason iCloud should suck as hard as it does, or why I have to go running to third party addons like Total Spaces, BetterTouchTool, SwitchResX, Second Bar, etc. etc. etc. for basic functions that a mac should handle naturally.

     

    It's not so much a series of cupboards as it is a series of doors leading into rooms. I want every room to be connected in as few doors as possible. Having randomly locked doors to direct me doesn't help me in the least, and in fact only causes more problems.

  • 10. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    OSXandiOS Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Lots of reading there. Simply put, you do this:

     

    (Assuming you are on a Mac and have your email open in composing mode):

     

    1. Click "attach"

    2. Window opens asking for you to browse for your attachment.

    2. Open Pages (this will by default open your documents).

    3. Drag and drop the file you want into the window that opened asking for your attachment.

    4. Done.

  • 11. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    Jeffrey R Kalmanek Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    why would I open Pages to attach a PDF I just downloaded from my insurance company?  Preview was the app that views that.  before I moved that file into iCloud I was able to find it as a file in finder. CJ Bradford is correct, Apple broke the visual metaphor of my desktop containing files.  if my desktop is in the cloud, Awesome! but all applications should be able to find the cloud from the existing UI for finding files, which is finder.  when it was iDisk this is exactly how it worked and I liked keeping my documents in iDisk.  Apple does seem to have adopted the Google/Windows policy of forcing you to use their other new apps to do things that didn't require it.  It isn't even logical that I would use pages to attach a PDF and it certainly is an uneeded step to open a different application just to attach a file into an email.  I should be able to do that from Mail, like I can with all of the files on my computer.

  • 12. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (35,455 points)

    Jeffrey R Kalmanek wrote:

     

    why would I open Pages to attach a PDF I just downloaded

    Nobody said that you should. The instructions were for attaching a document from Pages.

  • 13. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    Michael L. Bingham Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    When composing a message in Mac Mail, you can access your iCloud Documents by accessing "all my files" from the finder drop-down menu. You can easily access number, pages and keynote documents.

     

    Hope this helps.

  • 14. Re: How do I attach iCloud file to e-mail (Mac)?
    Michael L. Bingham Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    When composing a message in Mac Mail, you can access your iCloud Documents by accessing "all my files" from the finder drop-down menu. You can easily access number, pages and keynote documents.

     

    Also, at the top of the screen, next to where it also says "All My Files" you can sort the files by application, type, etc. This will include all documents stored in icloud, whether it's preview, pages, keynote or numbers.

     

    Screen Shot 2014-05-29 at 5.14.54 PM.png

     

    Hope this helps.