5 Replies Latest reply: Jun 9, 2013 7:59 PM by dobber1
dobber1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hi There,

 

I've seen several options on-line in non support comminuties about using termnial to encrypt files but is that the only true option on MAC's?  I'm trying to send a compressed/zipped file and then password protect or encrypt it.  I have tried the terminal option but have had zero success.

 

Any help you can provide would be awesome.

 

Thanks.


MacBook Air (13-inch Late 2010), OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.2)
  • 1. Re: encrypting files
    macjack Level 9 Level 9 (50,510 points)

    You can use Disk Utility to create an encrypted .dmg

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1578

    The also is  a way using Automator see this...

    http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13727_7-57514386-263/how-to-quickly-create-an-encry pted-archive-in-os-x/

  • 2. Re: encrypting files
    etresoft Level 7 Level 7 (24,265 points)

    dobber1 wrote:

     

    I've seen several options on-line in non support comminuties about using termnial to encrypt files but is that the only true option on MAC's?  I'm trying to send a compressed/zipped file and then password protect or encrypt it.  I have tried the terminal option but have had zero success.

    The best part about ZIP file encryption is that you never have to worry about your data. If you lose the password, it is very easy to decrypt.

     

    The first thing to do is find out what decryption capabillities your recepient has. You can create an encrypted ZIP file in the Terminal with "zip -encrypt file.zip sensitivefile.doc". ZIP just isn't secure at all. You would only do it because someone asked you to and you want to make them feel better.

  • 3. Re: encrypting files
    thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (27,925 points)

    How sensitive is this data you're sending, and what kind of systems are the recipients using? As etresoft points out, the encryption in zip files isn't particularly good. The encryption on a .dmg file is quite good, but that's not an option if you're sending to Windows users.

     

    If the intent is to send truly sensitive data via e-mail, the best option would be public key encryption, which involves each party getting a certificate from a trusted certificate authority and exchanging public keys. You can easily encrypt a file to anyone whose public key you have, and the only one who can decrypt the file is that person. For more information, here's a tutorial that looks pretty good:

     

    http://podfeet.com/NosillaCast/screensteps_tutorials/How_to_Set_Up_Encrypted_and _Signed_Email_in_Apple_Mail.pdf

  • 4. Re: encrypting files
    Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (117,700 points)

    There is no built-in, cross-platform GUI tool for encrypting files in OS X. If the file you want to send is small enough to email, or if you can break it up into pieces that are small enough, then S/MIME is a good option, but it calls for some preparation at both ends.

     

    Mail - How to Use a Secure Email Signing Certificate (Digital ID)

  • 5. Re: encrypting files
    dobber1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks to all of you for the help on this.  Aside from using 3rd party software it seems the process is a little cumbersome and since I'm sending these documents to windows users my options are limited.  I will carry on from here and appreciate the help!