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iMac upgrade/expansion?

640 Views 13 Replies Latest reply: Jun 13, 2013 10:38 AM by babowa RSS
5480 Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)
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Jun 3, 2013 10:18 PM

My iMac has become extremely slow, thinking, thinking, sometimes minutes...

 

Should or can I upgrade my machine?

 

I have iMac, Mac OS X (10.7.5), 2.7GHz Intel Core i5 (4GB 1333MHz DDR3):

 

Screen Shot 2013-06-04 at 7.12.54 AM.png

Would it help to double the memory? I have space, as seen above.

iMac, Mac OS X (10.7.5), 2.7GHz Intel Core i5
  • mende1 Level 10 Level 10 (89,470 points)
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    Jun 3, 2013 10:24 PM (in response to 5480)

    There are a few things to have a look before thinking about upgrading the computer because the hard drive may be failing or an application is consuming all CPU and memory. See > https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-3521

     

    If after having a look at that page you think that the problem is that you don't have enough memory, you can upgrade the memory and the hard drive. The iMac already comes with a 7200 rpm hard drive, so it's not possible to increase performance unless you install a SSD or a bigger hard drive if your hard disk hasn't got enough free storage.

     

    Respecting to memory, you can install 32 GB of memory if you have the Mid 2011 iMac. You can buy memory at Crucial or OWC > http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/memory/iMac/2011/DDR3_21.5_27

  • seventy one Level 6 Level 6 (8,475 points)
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    Jun 10, 2013 10:32 AM (in response to 5480)

    Might be best to start by upgrading your memory from 4GB to 8GB with two more matching 2gbs.   See how that goes.   If you are in Europe, you might find Crucial.com your best resource.

     

     

    Crtucial has facilities to guide you and will recommend the correct memory package to meet whatever needs you describe to them.  

     

    There may be benefits buying from your own geographical location insofar as Shipping charges, Local sales taxes and Exchange rates.  Check out the basic memory costs and do your sums.

     

    Guide to required RAM.    Lookup Mac Specs By Serial Number, Order, Model & EMC Number, Model ID @ EveryMac.com

  • mende1 Level 10 Level 10 (89,470 points)
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    Jun 11, 2013 10:53 PM (in response to 5480)

    You can install memory yourself and you won't void warranty. It's easy to install memory on a iMac > http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1423

     

    I agree with seventy one's reply. You should get Crucial RAM in order to prevent problems with your computer

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (22,055 points)
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    Jun 11, 2013 10:54 PM (in response to 5480)

    Absolutely increase your RAM to the mex supported by your machine - you have an incredibly high number of page-outs. That contributes to the slow down; also, almost all your RAM is being used, so increasing it should help.

     

    You should be able to add the RAM yourself; here are videos on how to do it - just pick your model:

     

    http://eshop.macsales.com/installvideos/

  • seventy one Level 6 Level 6 (8,475 points)
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    Jun 11, 2013 11:07 PM (in response to 5480)

    You can do it yourself.   I am not too bright with technical matters and I coped easily.   As far as the amount of memory is concerned, you certainly need more and the prices are not unreasonable, but it's all down to your budget in the end.

     

    Hope it all works out for you.

  • mende1 Level 10 Level 10 (89,470 points)
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    Jun 11, 2013 11:19 PM (in response to 5480)

    That's an option, but most of users don't need 16 GB of memory more. You should be fine with 2x4 GB, so you will have 12 GB of RAM. Note that your iMac supports 32 GB of RAM

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (22,055 points)
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    Jun 12, 2013 8:24 AM (in response to 5480)

    I've been running with a combo of 2 x 2 (orig) and 2 x 4 (from OWC) = a total of 12 GB for almost 3 years now. Works well.

     

    Don't have an SSD, so can't address that.

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (22,055 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 13, 2013 10:38 AM (in response to 5480)

    SSD is a solid state drive which can be used in place of the regular (spinning) hard drive. They do not have moving parts, but are quite expensive. They are hard drives - do not have anything to do with RAM. Here is some info on them from OWC:

     

    http://www.macsales.com/

     

    (You can also check that site for RAM and great videos on install instructions).

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