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  • 2,625. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    freediverx01 Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)

    It's way simpler on OSX, lol.

     

    The process consists of...

     

    1) Making sure you have enough free disk space

    2) Creating a new partition with Disk Utility (graphically, no command line needed.)

    3) Installing OSX on the new partition

    4) Holding down the Option key while rebooting to let you choose which partition to boot into.

     

    Once your testing is done, or if anything goes wrong, it's a simple matter to delete the extra partition and reclaim the disk space.

     

    Here are some instructions meant for people installing the Mavericks beta, but in your case you can simply install Mountain Lion on the new partition:

     

    http://www.tuaw.com/2013/06/13/devjuice-the-easy-way-to-set-up-an-os-x-mavericks -test-environm/

     

    (skip the article's "step 1")

  • 2,626. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    gphonei Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    James Wilde wrote:

     

    I'm actually running ML rather than Lion, but the problems are the same.

     

    In my case I had no problem with ML and wifi until an upgrade in, I think, December of 2011.  I've tried many of the suggestions, some a little esoteric, in this thread without success.  I have changed my router and tested Linksys, Netgear, D-link, Huawei and my current TP-link.  I've tried usb wifi adapters and the built-in adapter and nothing has worked.

    There are several visible signs of "WiFi not working".  Can you provide some addional information by answering the questions below?

     

    1. When it's not working, does your AirPort "icon" show black bars or grey bars.

    2. When it's not working, open a terminal window and type "ifconfig -a", hit return, and paste the output here.

    3. When it's not working, open a terminal window and type "ping 8.8.8.8", hit return, after about 10 seconds, hit CTRL-C, and paste the output here.

    4. When it's not working, open a terminal window and type "netstat -rn", hit return, and paste the output here.

    5. At the moment it stops working, can you see if your router is still running, or has it rebooted?

     

    I'd like to help you understand which part of your network connection is not "working".  We need to see if DHCP is working to reassign you, working configuration.  We need to see if your router is "rebooting" and that eventually finishes and things work again.  We need to see if your ISP connection is consistantly "up" and "working".

     

    Of all the routers you have tried, have they been new, or used routers (can you list model numbers), and did you make sure they had the lastest version of firmware from the manufacturer in them?  Is that latest firmware less than 1 year since release?  Many older routers have "preliminary" support for 802.11n and if they haven't been recently updated, I'd suspect they still have bugs/missing implementation details and the manufacturers are expecting people to buy new hardware to fix that.

     

    802.11ac is now here, and I would bet that Mavricks is going to "use" that by default if it's available.

  • 2,627. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    farrago Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I found a BUG and I wonder if it is really a BUG or a "working as designed" type of issue where the design is just bad.

     

    I have the new 802.11ac version of the airport extreme.  We  have a 14,000 square ft warehouse and a need for wireless access points here and there.  So, we've got about 5 apple routers and they're all connected to one 802.11ac airport extreme. Most are older AE routers. Some are older Time Capsules.

     

    Prior to getting the 802.11ac router, we used "TimedAccess" throughout the network and now we turned that off and just use WPA2 personal for security. 

     

    The bug I've noticed is that if we take an OLD unused router that was previously set to "TimedAccess" and connect it to our network in the Airport Utility... It goes UPSTREAM and changes our main new 802.11ac router back to "Timed access = ON".

     

    I was setting up a new computer today and also re-using an old router when this issue happened.  IT took me about 1/2 hour to figure out why I could no longer connect this one NEW macBook to our network.  It just wouldn't connect to our network and the error didn't really say why.  Then, I checked my main 802.11ac router settings from another computer and sure enough... "Timed access = ON" and this new computer was not in the list of computers that had access.  I turned "Timed access" BACK TO "OFF" and everything worked again.  This is about the 3rd time that that timed access has switched back on without me accessing that main 802.11ac Apple router via the airport utility.  Its always in conjunction with letting old routers join that did use that "Timed access" setting.

  • 2,628. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    Creshunt35 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have a Ubee and when I set it up recently I could not connect automatically to the internet. I did this step #1 ( went to diagnostic summary) and it recommended deleting my network!  I did and recreated it and now my wifi connects automatically!

     

    Thanks!

    gphonei wrote:

     

    Mary Beth Basil wrote:

     

    I don't think my problem is my UBEE router.  Charter has come out to check it twice and they say it's fine.  Besides, my ipad, iphone and Dell notebook all work fine.  Only my macbook pro has the problem.  The router also worked fine untill I installed ML.   I have 4 black arcs indicating my signal strength is strong but every 15 to 20 minutes I get nothing when I try to change pages - still have black arcs but if I click on the arcs it says looking for networks with spinning ball in grey.  If I click on turn wifi off for a few seconds, then on, it usually works for another 20 minutes.  Doesn't Apple ever read these forums?

    I think they are, given the email offering help that I and others have received.  The basic deal though, is that this isn't a "support" channel.  Their Apple Care and Genius Bar at the stores, seem to be the way that they do support activities.  Have you taken any other steps besides letting Charter check your router?  It might be interesting to try changing one or more of the following, which some people find solves the problem.

     

    1.  Use a fixed channel, 1, 6 or 11 instead of auto discover

    2.  Switch to a specific protocol, 802.11g or 802.11n. If all of your devices support N, try N first, see if things get worse.  If so, try G.

    3.  Move your router to a different place or orientation.  Sometimes, reflecting signals, or just stuff inbetween the two devices can create problems for "weak" signals.

     

    The information on this web page, http://wirelesslanprofessionals.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Spectrum-Analysis -Primer-Part-1.pdf, has a huge amount of detail about how WiFi works, and how RF signal nomenclature applies to what you see/experience.  I'm not suggesting that you must look at such detail, but sometimes, just understanding the nomenclature can help you look at what is happening and understand the problem.

     

    The diagnostic tools in mountain lion can help you see more about what is going on.  It can be a little time consuming, but fighting with this issue seems to be pretty time consuming for many people too, and it seems to me that fighting with something that gets you closer to the solution is worth while.

     

    1. Hold down the option key and click on your airport signal indicator in the tool bar at the top right of your screen. 2. At the bottom, select "Open Wi-Fi Diagnostics...".

    3. Select "Turn on Debug Logs"

    4. Click "Continue".

    5. Click on the > arrow next to "Basic Logs"

    6. Select "DHCP" and "Wi-Fi Logging".

    7. Make sure that "Notify me when the Wi-Fi interface [Disconnects from the network]" is selected and checked.

    8. Wait for your machine to disconnect.

    9. Select "Stop Logging" in the drop down that appears on the diagnostics window.

    10.  Wait a moment for it to assemble the logs.

    11.  A finder window will open with "WiFiDiagnosticReport*.tgz" selected.

    12.  Double click on that file name to unpack it.

    13.  Double click on the resulting folder to open in.

    14.  Right click on the "wifi.log" file, and select "Open With -> TextEdit.app", or if TextEdit.app is not available, select "Other...", at the bottom, and then select it from the Applications window that opens.

    15.  Scroll to the bottom of the opened window, and read through the messages there to see if you find anything that is informative about what happened that caused the failure.

     

    You could just copy and paste the last 20-30 lines here perhaps if you are not sure what you are looking at/for.

  • 2,629. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    Okipedi Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have the same problem with all my apple products and started after I use Linsys router. My friend has the same problems. I called linksys and they say it's my hardware not theirs. Any suggestions?

  • 2,630. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    Server rookie Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)

    I found out that some machines are more sensitive than others. I suddenly had problems with my iPad2 around the same time of a system upgrade. It later turned out that 1 of my 3 airports is dying and sometimes drops out of the WDS. Other machines don't have a problem with that but my iPad2 has. I have to boot the airport to get it back in the WDS and then my iPad2 can get back on its wifi.

  • 2,631. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    gphonei Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Okipedi wrote:

     

    I have the same problem with all my apple products and started after I use Linsys router. My friend has the same problems. I called linksys and they say it's my hardware not theirs. Any suggestions?

    I can tell you, with utmost certainty, that this problem, across the board, is a router problem.  Your router is not meeting appropriate standards for behavior or communications for your environment/equipment.  The WiFi standards are large and complex and include so many things for just WiFi, let alone the underlying behaviors that the WiFi "connection" needs to support happening.  If you have not updated the firmware on your router to the latest that the manufacturer has released you need to update the firmware.  There are bugs everywhere in routers.  They are complete computer systems with complex software systems which always seem to need something fixed.  The cheap consumer routers that only support up to 802.11g should be thrown out.  You need to be using an 802.11n router and dual band would be a better choice so that you can eliminate all the interference sources on 2.4ghz from other various consumer wireless devices such as baby monitors, cordless telephones and other "old, outdated and broken equipment".

     

    I have stopped by linksys routers for the past 10 years, because cisco pretty much ruined that brand.  My choices now are either netgear, ubnt.com, or Apple's airports.  I've never had problems with netgear dropping connections or rebooting like the linksys routers and many others do. 

  • 2,632. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    James Wilde Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    At the moment there are 2631 replies to the OP, so this is a problem which has exercised a lot of people for a very long time.  Here's my story.

     

    I was a happy user of a MBP inherited from my son for about three years, at which time it gave up.  I bought a Mac Mini which also worked to my satisfaction until 12:14 on the 18th of October, 2011.  I know the date because I have looked up the list of software updates, and that was the last OS X update in late 2011.  From that date my Mac Mini has regularly dropped the network, causing a great deal of frustration.

     

    I have an old Dell laptop running XP, my wife has an Asus running Windows 7, I have a HP running both Windows 7 and Ubuntu linux, various guests have run Windows boxes, iPhones, iPads and Android machines, and an old MBP, probably with leopard as the opsys, and all of them have been able to connect to the network, simply and easily, as soon as they have been given the key. But not the Mac Mini since October 18, 2011.

     

    I have tried a Linksys router (all machines except the Mac Mini worked perfectly), a D-Link router (same thing), a Netgear router (same again) and a TP-Link router, the newest, which has had its firmware updated to the very latest.  Same story again:  all machines work perfectly, except the Mac Mini.

     

    I like the Mac environment.  I think the Mac environment is the way computers should be made.  But I don't have time to mess about trying to connect to the internet five or ten times a day nor trying all the arcane suggestions one has seen in this thread.

     

    As a last resort before scrapping the Mac Mini and going back to my second-favourite opsys, linux, I borrowed an Airport Extreme from my local Mac shop.  Suddenly my Mac Mini works.  So now I'm faced with purchasing an Airport Express for 2-3 times the price of any other household router or scrapping the Mac Mini.  I'm certainly not going to keep the Airport Extreme, which costs 6-8 times more than any other household router.

     

    Now I think I can be forgiven if I smell a rat here.  I may be accused of being a conspiracy theorist. But it seems strange to me that none of the big name router brands has worked with my Mac Mini since October 18, 2011 although no other machine available to me has had the least problem.  Something, reason tells me, is rotten in the state of Denmark.  And it won't do to suggest that only Apple uses the official specification for 802.11n in their computers and routers and that all the big name routers use defective variations.  I don't believe it.

     

    It wouldn't surprise me if I get a lot of replies to this post, suggestions on more things to test and things to try.  I don't have the time any longer.  I spent most of the last 30 years of my working life building and running computer systems, mostly varieties of UNIX, but now I'm a pensioner, and a computer to me is a tool, and no longer a toy.

     

    A friend, an old lady in her eighties, who uses an iMac has asked me to service her machine.  She's running Leopard, and my first thought was to bring her up to date.  My second thought was to check what she uses for router.  I think she said she had got one from her ISP when she changed recently.  If so I don't dare update her opsys.  The one she has works.  The one I would install probably wouldn't.

     

    As for me, at the moment it's looking good for linux, since that machine has 8 GB of memory and runs like lightning.  My poor Mac Mini only has 3 GB and I spend an appreciable part of each day looking at a beachball.  If I didn't have to invest in an Airport Express, I might have increased the memory in the Mini.

  • 2,633. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    gphonei Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have an old Dell laptop running XP, my wife has an Asus running Windows 7, I have a HP running both Windows 7 and Ubuntu linux, various guests have run Windows boxes, iPhones, iPads and Android machines, and an old MBP, probably with leopard as the opsys, and all of them have been able to connect to the network, simply and easily, as soon as they have been given the key. But not the Mac Mini since October 18, 2011.

    There have been many people posting here about "trying everything".  I won't argue with you about this, because I don't know "why you have the problem". 

    I have tried a Linksys router (all machines except the Mac Mini worked perfectly), a D-Link router (same thing), a Netgear router (same again) and a TP-Link router, the newest, which has had its firmware updated to the very latest.  Same story again:  all machines work perfectly, except the Mac Mini.

    One of the important details here, is that you are talking about different OSes which means that there are different default settings/behaviors of the WiFi stack, and more specifically different drivers for the hardware, which can deal with specific "router problems" in particular ways.

     

    Microsoft has been dealing with "bad routers" for a long time, and have made specific "retry" and  "reboot" and "restart" behaviors a common thing, to work around "problems".  I won't argue that this is a good/bad thing, I just want you to note that some "problems" are worked around in the OSes by them having particular strategies for dealling with failings of the wireless router/network due to any number of problems.

     

    Should Apple be better at doing that too, perhaps so.  But practically, we do know, that Apple supports their equipment and software as a "complete solution" space, and when you introduce "someone elses box" into the picture, you might experience something unexpected because practically, Apple doesn't feel  obligated to be testing against everyones "everything".   In the PC market, there are a lot more "people" and "business" doing repeated testing of all kinds of things, in their use of "the boxes". 

     

    Another point, is that specific models of the brands that you cited, are known to be "terrible" routers, while other models have much better designs.  So, it's still a toss up, on whether you can really say that you've proven that there isn't a problem with the router.

     

    I like the Mac environment.  I think the Mac environment is the way computers should be made.  But I don't have time to mess about trying to connect to the internet five or ten times a day nor trying all the arcane suggestions one has seen in this thread.

     

    As a last resort before scrapping the Mac Mini and going back to my second-favourite opsys, linux, I borrowed an Airport Extreme from my local Mac shop.  Suddenly my Mac Mini works.  So now I'm faced with purchasing an Airport Express for 2-3 times the price of any other household router or scrapping the Mac Mini.  I'm certainly not going to keep the Airport Extreme, which costs 6-8 times more than any other household router.

     

    Now I think I can be forgiven if I smell a rat here.  I may be accused of being a conspiracy theorist. But it seems strange to me that none of the big name router brands has worked with my Mac Mini since October 18, 2011 although no other machine available to me has had the least problem.  Something, reason tells me, is rotten in the state of Denmark.  And it won't do to suggest that only Apple uses the official specification for 802.11n in their computers and routers and that all the big name routers use defective variations.  I don't believe it.

     

    It wouldn't surprise me if I get a lot of replies to this post, suggestions on more things to test and things to try.  I don't have the time any longer.  I spent most of the last 30 years of my working life building and running computer systems, mostly varieties of UNIX, but now I'm a pensioner, and a computer to me is a tool, and no longer a toy.

     

    A friend, an old lady in her eighties, who uses an iMac has asked me to service her machine.  She's running Leopard, and my first thought was to bring her up to date.  My second thought was to check what she uses for router.  I think she said she had got one from her ISP when she changed recently.  If so I don't dare update her opsys.  The one she has works.  The one I would install probably wouldn't.

     

    As for me, at the moment it's looking good for linux, since that machine has 8 GB of memory and runs like lightning.  My poor Mac Mini only has 3 GB and I spend an appreciable part of each day looking at a beachball.  If I didn't have to invest in an Airport Express, I might have increased the memory in the Mini.

     

    The "beach ball" experience, is directly related to disk drive speed, and RAM.  In most modern GUI software designs, a "single threaded" model is used, because they don't want the GUI thrashing through "cache" control and "locking" operations at the processor level, so that multiple threads of execution, can access shared data structures.  In the end, what is happening is that a GUI originated "action", is using the Disk system, or some other high latency interaction is occurring.  This causes the GUI thread, to not be able to service other "requests", until that thread's actions are completed, and thus the beach ball pops up to say "I am already doing something else".

     

    You don't say that you upgraded that Mac Mini to any newer OS, so I am going to guess that it's running Leopard.  Is it a powerPC based mac mini or an intel based mac mini?  Since Leopard, the transition to Mountain Lion, on my intel core II duo iMac (24"), I've noticed a lot better performance with 4GB (instead of 2GB) and a more modern 7200 RPM 1TB drive that I've put in it.   Time and technology move on, and as OS "base" code has increased in "size" and "data" use, there is less RAM for applications, and you may be experiencing the beach ball because of paging/swapping going on as well.

  • 2,634. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    James Wilde Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    One of the important details here, is that you are talking about different OSes which means that there are different default settings/behaviors of the WiFi stack, and more specifically different drivers for the hardware, which can deal with specific "router problems" in particular ways.

     

    Microsoft has been dealing with "bad routers" for a long time, and have made specific "retry" and  "reboot" and "restart" behaviors a common thing, to work around "problems".  I won't argue that this is a good/bad thing, I just want you to note that some "problems" are worked around in the OSes by them having particular strategies for dealling with failings of the wireless router/network due to any number of problems.

     

    Should Apple be better at doing that too, perhaps so.  But practically, we do know, that Apple supports their equipment and software as a "complete solution" space, and when you introduce "someone elses box" into the picture, you might experience something unexpected because practically, Apple doesn't feel  obligated to be testing against everyones "everything".   In the PC market, there are a lot more "people" and "business" doing repeated testing of all kinds of things, in their use of "the boxes". 

     

    Another point, is that specific models of the brands that you cited, are known to be "terrible" routers, while other models have much better designs.  So, it's still a toss up, on whether you can really say that you've proven that there isn't a problem with the router.

    It won't do, Gphonei.  No matter how much you proselitise, you can't get round the fact that all these different OSes with their different settings, all of them can connect without problems to my "bad routers".  As to Apple, with their market share, they can't expect that people will automatically buy an Apple router to build into their network, not even for company use, and certainly not for home use, so, yes, they should be adjusting to the routers on the market.  It's not that hard - Microsoft can do it.  And don't forget that most people get their routers from their ISP, at least here in Sweden.

     

    Besides, the HP which I have, is a 4540s.  It contains the Atheros wifi circuit board which I understand is the current circuit board of choice for Apple.  Indeed, that model is the favourite machine for use as a Hackintosh because of its similarity to the Mac configuration.  And besides, we know Apple can do it.  Our iPhones and iPads have no problem, so why the computers?

    You don't say that you upgraded that Mac Mini to any newer OS, so I am going to guess that it's running Leopard.  Is it a powerPC based mac mini or an intel based mac mini?  Since Leopard, the transition to Mountain Lion, on my intel core II duo iMac (24"), I've noticed a lot better performance with 4GB (instead of 2GB) and a more modern 7200 RPM 1TB drive that I've put in it.   Time and technology move on, and as OS "base" code has increased in "size" and "data" use, there is less RAM for applications, and you may be experiencing the beach ball because of paging/swapping going on as well.

    I was using Mountain Lion at the time Apple broke wifi.  I upgraded to Lion in August 2012, in the hope that Apple, who had not by then fixed the broken wifi in ML might have tried to fix it in Lion.  I have an old ML installation disk somewhere, and I have considered reinstalling my Mac Mini (which is an Intel btw) and turning off automatic updates.  Maybe when I've made the transfer to my linux box I'll spend a rainy day trying that.

  • 2,635. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    James Wilde Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Now here could be an interesting fact.  I did what I said I would in the last paragraph of my previous message: I installed Snow Leopard on a USB stick, and boot from that.  One thing I noted quite quickly is that the connection, to my TP-Link router is of the type Airport (as opposed to Ethernet, Bluetooth, etc).  When I boot from Lion, my connection (via Airport Extreme) is of the type Wifi, and Airport is not one of the options.  I don't know, maybe they just changed the name in Lion.

     

    Also when I start Airport Utility in Lion, the TP-Link router is not found even under Other Wifi Devices.

  • 2,637. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    James Wilde Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks, CT.  That explains the terminology difference.

  • 2,638. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    gphonei Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    James Wilde wrote:

     

    One of the important details here, is that you are talking about different OSes which means that there are different default settings/behaviors of the WiFi stack, and more specifically different drivers for the hardware, which can deal with specific "router problems" in particular ways.

     

    Microsoft has been dealing with "bad routers" for a long time, and have made specific "retry" and  "reboot" and "restart" behaviors a common thing, to work around "problems".  I won't argue that this is a good/bad thing, I just want you to note that some "problems" are worked around in the OSes by them having particular strategies for dealling with failings of the wireless router/network due to any number of problems.

     

    Should Apple be better at doing that too, perhaps so.  But practically, we do know, that Apple supports their equipment and software as a "complete solution" space, and when you introduce "someone elses box" into the picture, you might experience something unexpected because practically, Apple doesn't feel  obligated to be testing against everyones "everything".   In the PC market, there are a lot more "people" and "business" doing repeated testing of all kinds of things, in their use of "the boxes". 

     

    Another point, is that specific models of the brands that you cited, are known to be "terrible" routers, while other models have much better designs.  So, it's still a toss up, on whether you can really say that you've proven that there isn't a problem with the router.

    It won't do, Gphonei.  No matter how much you proselitise, you can't get round the fact that all these different OSes with their different settings, all of them can connect without problems to my "bad routers".

    I understand that it can look very much like "one is wrong" and "all the others are right".  Technology can make you feel that this is a very valid position.  What others have pointed out here, is that Apple has started using all of the advanced features of 802.11N because of "airplay" and "display mirroring" so that they can get every bit of performance out of the network that is possible.   What Microsoft will do, is use the "most common", "least poorly implemented" features of "802.11N", so that they don't have to try and figure out how to work around the variations.

     

    Practically too, very few wireless routers use proprietary software any more.   Instead, they are using "Linux WRT", or some other "standard stack" because it just costs too much money to "engineer" something when you are selling into a commodity market place.   Apple's prices are higher, and I'd suggest that this is a different created by them having their own WiFi stack and devices (RF systems and antenna design takes time to get right).

     

    I'm not trying to say that Apple always gets it right.  I'm saying that most of the time, consumer routers are getting 802.11N "wrong", and they have very real problems.  In all of the places that I've been, PC only networks seem to do okay.  But, as soon as you add an iOS device or a MAC and start using stream services, the routers start acting weird, rebooting and otherwise show that the firmware is not really compatible with the devices around them.

     

    The number one rule for programming on the network, is "be liberal in what you accept and flawless in what you send".  Most of these consumer routers that are not using Linux based software, or other "widely used stacks", more often than not demonstrate that they are not liberal/tolerant in what they accept.

     

    We had a linksys EA4500 in the office that was complete junk, with tall the newest software installed etc.

    This router is a dual band router with 802.11N support.  On most days, it would reboot and cut VPN connections or web sessions every hour or so. 

    As to Apple, with their market share, they can't expect that people will automatically buy an Apple router to build into their network, not even for company use, and certainly not for home use, so, yes, they should be adjusting to the routers on the market.  It's not that hard - Microsoft can do it.  And don't forget that most people get their routers from their ISP, at least here in Sweden.

     

    This is a problem in and of itself.  People who are in this "camp", are getting the lowest end, cheapest router that the ISP could find, because, well, it's an expense that they'd rather not have.   They'd like to be able to support their customers, so they use an all-in-one DSL/Cable modem-Router combo device, which has custom firmware, created for them, so that they can remotely administer it.  The problem is, is that they then end up with an early version of that firmware, for their application, and it will generally have broken functionality of one kind or another, and the device vendor will charge them for "fixes" to their custom codebase.   Thus, they will refuse to fix things that don't get reported as large issues for every user.

     

    Buy another wireless router, turn off DHCP on it, and attach a cable from a LAN port on the new router, back to the LAN port on the ISP provided router, and now you'll be able to manage your wireless network with a viable router.

     

    The WiFI radios at http://ubnt.com, the nanostation loco m2 and m5, in particular, are great wireless radios that you can configure to be "access points" in "bridge" mode, and get excellant WiFi performance by putting them in a corner of your "house" and pointing them to the opposite corner.  They have a 45 degree beam of emission with a back lobe that is 100ft in radius (at least).  They are 2-3 times the output power of consumer WiFi radios, and are thus much better at delivering great signals through many walls, or even into the outdoor area of your property.

    Besides, the HP which I have, is a 4540s.  It contains the Atheros wifi circuit board which I understand is the current circuit board of choice for Apple.  Indeed, that model is the favourite machine for use as a Hackintosh because of its similarity to the Mac configuration.  And besides, we know Apple can do it.  Our iPhones and iPads have no problem, so why the computers?

    Apple has a number of modifications to the WiFi stack to support airdrop and many other "no router needed" features.  These signals/packets are the ones which most likely cause other equipment to become confused or "crash".  The hardware is backed by alot of firmware and software which collectively does all the work.  The firmware in a wireless, on board radio, is just going to be managing the RF level details.  It's what happens with the "packets" that it extracts from the airwaves, where things start to get problematic.

    You don't say that you upgraded that Mac Mini to any newer OS, so I am going to guess that it's running Leopard.  Is it a powerPC based mac mini or an intel based mac mini?  Since Leopard, the transition to Mountain Lion, on my intel core II duo iMac (24"), I've noticed a lot better performance with 4GB (instead of 2GB) and a more modern 7200 RPM 1TB drive that I've put in it.   Time and technology move on, and as OS "base" code has increased in "size" and "data" use, there is less RAM for applications, and you may be experiencing the beach ball because of paging/swapping going on as well.

    I was using Mountain Lion at the time Apple broke wifi.  I upgraded to Lion in August 2012, in the hope that Apple, who had not by then fixed the broken wifi in ML might have tried to fix it in Lion.  I have an old ML installation disk somewhere, and I have considered reinstalling my Mac Mini (which is an Intel btw) and turning off automatic updates.  Maybe when I've made the transfer to my linux box I'll spend a rainy day trying that.

    Mountain Lion is the most recent release, Lion happened before that, and then before lion was Snow leopard and the Leopard came before that.  The Panther release, was the last "Power PC" native release.

     

    I am not sure I understand how you upgraded from Mountain Lion to Lion.  Perhaps you are just sarcastically saying upgraded because you feel it "fixed" your problems and made things better? 

     

    I can not speak with outright authority on what is going on here.  But I can simply state that you router is not compatible with what Apple is expecting to be possible on the network, and this is causing the problem.

     

    It wouldn't surprise me if your "bad" routers, are not ignoring a packet that they don't understand, and instead are sending back a restart request that forces the computer back to sending the same packet that the router doesn't understand, and which it should be ignoring.

     

    Look for the previous posts on "sleep proxy" details.  For power saving to work well, and for network "features" that involve "server" behaviors, Apple's routers support being a "proxy" for the services while the computers "sleep".  The router will send "wake on lan" packets to sleeping computers when they notice connection requests for those routers on the network (and the computer is sleeping).  This is one behavior which implies new packets on the network.   The computers negociate sleep proxy behavior with the router, and if the router is not ignoring those packets that it can't understand, then perhaps that is the ultimate issue.

  • 2,639. Re: Lion WiFi Connection Problem
    James Wilde Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Interesting, Gphonei.

     

    This message comes to you from my Mac Mini, the one I've been having problems with.  The difference is it is now running Snow Leopard and is connected via my usual TP-Link router and not the Airport Extreme the rest of my network is still running on.  It has been running long enough that I think I can say that, by now, my hdd version of Mountain Lion would have lost the connection.

     

    I apologise btw. I made a mistake with the naming of different versions.  I thought the sequence was leopard, snow leopard, mountain lion, lion.  So I was running on lion in October 2011, when wifi broke, and upgraded to Mountain Lion in August 2012.

     

    I have now installed Snow Leopard on a USB stick, and am running from that - I had a spot of bother creating a second partition on my hard disk but I will be installing Lion onto another partition on the USB stick and testing that.  Hopefully the version of Lion I have was taken before wifi broke.

     

    I'd love to get back to ML as some of the applications have slightly different interfaces with which I have become familiar, but since ML was released with the broken wifi, I have little hope that a test from my original installation disk will work.