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MacBook Pro Retina display burn-in?

1273407 Views 9,422 Replies Latest reply: Apr 14, 2014 1:55 PM by SonGuko RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • FrancisDaza Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 20, 2013 12:18 PM (in response to MartyF81)

    Thanks, Marty.

     

    Actually, I would like to know any test or some typical image which I could show to the Genius. Do you know something about?

  • MartyF81 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 20, 2013 12:24 PM (in response to FrancisDaza)

    Not really, it is completely visual.  Some Professional Calibration units will do "Uniformity" tests where you actually move the calibration unit around the screen to take measurements in different locations.

    Your best bet is to have a pure white screen as the Yellow would be easiest to see with that.

  • bentley123456 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 20, 2013 12:30 PM (in response to Euroart)

    Thank you for your reponse. No bad pixels. The yellow tinge is very slight and only noticable on a white background. The screen is beautiful otherwise and I wouldn't take a chance on replacing it with all the problems I've seen here. I did return 3 iPad 4s because of yellow areas on the screen, but they were very noticable. The 4th iPad is perfect and has the same warm screen as my rMBP which I prefer. It is easier on the eyes.

  • bentley123456 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 20, 2013 12:42 PM (in response to MartyF81)

    Thank you for your response Marty. The yellow tinge is very slight and I won't take a chance on replacing an otherwise great screen. It has a warmer white screen which I originally thought was yellowish compared to the bluish white screen on my Macbook Air and iPad. I took it into Apple to look into this and was told that it actually has a more accurate white point. The warmer Samsung screen is much easier on the eyes and I'm very happy with it overall. I would be very unhappy with image retention.

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 20, 2013 8:38 PM (in response to Canuck1970)

    Canuck1970 wrote:

     

    Regarding the Samsung displays in the Apple stores (and elsewhere) looking so good, do you really think they're not calibrating them?

     

    Well no, they're not calibrating the Retina MacBook Pros in Apple stores or electronics retailers. You can open Settings > Displays > Color and see that it's set to Display or Color LCD.

  • shayster98 Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
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    Aug 20, 2013 9:50 PM (in response to Merch Visoiu)

    Exactly; and calibration might actually look worse to people used to uncalibrated screens. Calibrated monitors are generally less bright and the white balance matches the color (as close as possible) to white paper, so that a photographer can expect that the photographs on the screen look similar after they're printed.

     

    My worry is that the Samsung displays are less accurate and will not reach the calibration target as close as the LG panels would.

  • Canuck1970 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:31 AM (in response to Merch Visoiu)

    Merch Visoiu wrote:

     

    Canuck1970 wrote:

     

    Regarding the Samsung displays in the Apple stores (and elsewhere) looking so good, do you really think they're not calibrating them?

     

    Well no, they're not calibrating the Retina MacBook Pros in Apple stores or electronics retailers. You can open Settings > Displays > Color and see that it's set to Display or Color LCD.

    You can save color profiles under any name you like, so this doesn't necessarily mean they're not calibrating them. I would not be surprised if Apple store employees are told to calibrate all floor model displays and save the new profile under the default name. That sounds like something they'd do, to be honest.

  • Canuck1970 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:36 AM (in response to shayster98)

    shayster98 wrote:

     

    Exactly; and calibration might actually look worse to people used to uncalibrated screens. Calibrated monitors are generally less bright and the white balance matches the color (as close as possible) to white paper, so that a photographer can expect that the photographs on the screen look similar after they're printed.

     

    My worry is that the Samsung displays are less accurate and will not reach the calibration target as close as the LG panels would.

    OK, as Marty and I have suggested, if color accuracy is that important to you, please calibrate your displays with a proper calibration device. If the calibration software generates an error, take a screenshot of that error and bring your machine into an Apple store for servicing. If the calibration is successful, and you still don't like the way your display looks, give yourself a chance to get used to it, because you're seeing the proper colors on your display, possibly for the first time. Where the human eye is concerned, color is very subjective, not absolute.

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:36 AM (in response to Canuck1970)

    Canuck1970 wrote:

     

    You can save color profiles under any name you like, so this doesn't necessarily mean they're not calibrating them. I would not be surprised if Apple store employees are told to calibrate all floor model displays and save the new profile under the default name. That sounds like something they'd do, to be honest.

     

    I just tried it. If you save a calibration with the name Display or Color LCD then you will have 2 of them because they're getting saved into a different directory. The in-store display units aren't calibrated.

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:39 AM (in response to Canuck1970)

    Canuck1970 wrote:

     

    If the calibration is successful, and you still don't like the way your display looks, give yourself a chance to get used to it, because you're seeing the proper colors on your display, possibly for the first time.

     

    How do you know that a display that has been calibrated using a colour calibrator is now showing colours accurately?

  • millerrh512 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:40 AM (in response to Merch Visoiu)

    Is it possible that part of the manufacturing run includes calibration that then gets written to the default Color LCD profile?  It would make sense if that's the case if the factory built Samsungs aren't yellow, but the replacements are.  I bet a different factory default is applied based on the display used at least.

  • Canuck1970 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:54 AM (in response to Merch Visoiu)

    Merch Visoiu wrote:

     

    Canuck1970 wrote:

     

    If the calibration is successful, and you still don't like the way your display looks, give yourself a chance to get used to it, because you're seeing the proper colors on your display, possibly for the first time.

     

    How do you know that a display that has been calibrated using a colour calibrator is now showing colours accurately?

    Calibration devices are absolute and quantitative. For instance, as part of the calibration process, the calibrator tool will take an exact reading of a red square on your screen. If that red square's numerical value does not equal what it should, the calibration software will adjust it until the values agree. The human eye, on the other hand, is subjective. For instance, the ambient light in the room, which affects your iris, could throw off your judgement of a color's brightness. The calibration head (at least on mine) sits flush with the surface of the screen.

     

    Obviously the accuracy of calibration devices can vary depending on their quality, but if you pick up one that was well-reviewed, you should be OK. Pretty much any calibrator is going to be better than the human eye.

     

    Cheers.

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:57 AM (in response to Canuck1970)

    Canuck1970 wrote:

     

    If that read square's numerical value does not equal what it should, the calibration software adjusts it until the numbers agree. The human eye, on the other hand, is subjective.

     

     

     

    If the display itself is defective and can't show blue properly, as I believe is the case with these yellow Samsung displays, then can a calibrator fix that? Why should we trust that the result of a calibration is accurate?

  • MartyF81 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 9:02 AM (in response to Merch Visoiu)

    Because the Calibration sensor's entire job is to read the color of the screen and make adjustments until it is correct. If it cannot dial the blue up or down far enough to correct it.... it will give you an error that your display cannot be calibrated.

  • Canuck1970 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Aug 21, 2013 9:21 AM (in response to Merch Visoiu)

    Merch Visoiu wrote:

     

    Canuck1970 wrote:

     

    If that read square's numerical value does not equal what it should, the calibration software adjusts it until the numbers agree. The human eye, on the other hand, is subjective.

     

     

     

    If the display itself is defective and can't show blue properly, as I believe is the case with these yellow Samsung displays, then can a calibrator fix that? Why should we trust that the result of a calibration is accurate?

    If the display is defective, the calibrator can't fix that, but most calibrators will generate an error message if the calibration software can't adjust the display to the correct color values. A screenshot of that error message would be proof that your display was defective. However, if the calibration process is successful, you can be pretty confident that the colors are correct.

     

    P.S.

    I replied before seeing Marty's virtually identical comment.

     

    Message was edited by: Canuck1970

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