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Drive won't read any dvd-ejects it automatically after spinning some time

793262 Views 1,120 Replies Latest reply: Apr 11, 2014 6:42 PM by ludrubru RSS
  • Marty Martino Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Yes, I did.  Interestingly enough, it rejected a couple of disks immediately at afterward.  Then, with a Tiger install dvd, it started working.  I'll try a couple of different disks when I get home tonight to see if they work.

  • DeanHopkins Calculating status...

    YESSS!!!  the cleaning cloth/driver's license worked amazingly!!!  a bunch of dust and lint pulled out with my sunglasses cleaning cloth.  save yourself a headache and try this first. 

  • jimchik2 Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)

    Interesting... repairing permissions seems to have at least been a part of, if not the solloution. I can't readily discern whether it was a DVD or CD nor RW or R (the disc is covered with a full sized stick-on label), but the first couple of attempts simply brought up the blank icon on the desktop. After rebuilding permissions, I was able to pull data off of the disc.

     

    YMMV

  • stephanfrombel Calculating status...

    had the same problem for some time, suspected a hardware problem rather than software especially since at last try cd came out scratched... so i took the drive out to be able to look inside: no foreign body but tiny loosened screw protruding from the drive mechanism: after opening drive, tightening screw and replacing drive evrything works fine again.

     

    drive specs:

    HL-DT-ST DVDRW  GS23N

    MBP 13 mid 2009

  • faroukbax Calculating status...

    After hesitantly cleaning, my CD was accepted and I could open a few photos contained therin, but then it quit with error messages. I am going to try the cleaning once more now that I know to focus on the left side and insert no more than an inch and a half.

    Interesting, when I asked the "Genius" at the Apple Store about cleaning, he dismissed it offhand saying there was no choice but to get the optical drive replaced.

  • protosatori Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    This has been a long Macbook and MBP issue.

    I am on my second MBP and have the same issue again.

    My 2 bestfriends also experienced the same.

    I can see loads of people complaining about here

    and nothing.

     

    I can't see whats its so difficult on making quality

    DVD and CDs readers?

     

    What's the point here?

     

    Honestly, I feel so frustated with this.

  • indigopete Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    protosatori wrote:

     

    I can't see whats its so difficult on making quality

    DVD and CDs readers?

     

    I can.

     

    It's the need to fit them into an ever decreasing amount of space.

     

    Optical disc is basically eighties technology - full of moving parts, lenses and lights. It just doesn't get much smaller than a 2 cm thick box without becoming unreliable.

     

    Apple have done the right thing in getting rid of them as an internal component. I got my Macbook DvD replaced (free of charge) and it failed as well. Everyone I know with a post 2009 Macbook pro has a failed DvD drive.

     

    Just write it off - I always use an external one now (even though I'm still using my 2009 Macbook !). It's a waste of effort trying to get it work. Some of the solutions offered in this thread work temporarily (like the credit card wrapped in cloth) but the fundamental problem is that they're unreliable and that problem isn't going to go away.

  • protosatori Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks indigopete.

    But how come they did'nt come with the idea of suplying it as

    as side equipment in the first place after so many failures?

    So now they will keep charging for complete computer and

    I will have to buy an external drive?

     

    Just one world for this.... dishonesty.

     

    Apple was one day a company to be proud of being an user.

    I pay about 3 to 4 times the price of a PC here in Brazil to

    have this machine and I can't see anyone having the same

    ridiculous problems with a CD drive on they ugly HPs.

  • indigopete Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    protosatori wrote:

     

    Thanks indigopete.

    But how come they did'nt come with the idea of suplying it as

    as side equipment in the first place after so many failures?

    So now they will keep charging for complete computer and

    I will have to buy an external drive?

     

    protosatori - you are right, you'll have to buy an external DvD. I don't think that's dishonest, it's just being practical. (I don't mean you are unjustified in being angry about your internal one failing - you are definitely justified - I'm just saying, I can understand why they are unreliable and why Apple have decided to drop them from new models).

     

    Besides, they don't even make them so they had to depend on 3rd parties for reliability.

     

    DvD drives are obsolete in technological terms. For me anyway (there's another thread with a raging debate about this) I don't want one in my laptop. External drives are dirt cheap and far more reliable than the internal ones. It's only a matter of time till everyone else follows suit.

     

    Just try to "reprogram" your thinking - think "external DvDs are great, internal DvDs are rubbish" and you'll be fine

  • iPhoneSk8er Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I had the same problem. You just have to download VLC for mac, install and open it up, and it will start to read it and play the dvd.

  • PlotinusVeritas Level 6 Level 6 (13,695 points)

    DvD drives are obsolete in technological terms.

     

     

    Absolutely INCORRECT.   In terms of media consumption, that is mostly true, ....however in terms of secure data archiving, DVD burning is extremely alive and well.

     

    Given the second law of thermodynamics, any and all current mfg. HD will, under perfect storage conditions tend themselves to depolarization and a point will be reached, even if the HD mechanism is perfect, that the ferromagnetic read/write surface of the platter inside the HD will entropy to the point of no return for data extraction.

     

    HD life varies, but barring mechanical failure, 3-8 years typically. Unlike the case of a fire extinguisher and smoke alarm to protect yourself from a potential fire that “could” happen but probably wont happen; a HD failure is a ‘fire’ that is 100% guaranteed to happen within 3-8 years. This makes DVD archives an unmitigated necessity.

     

    Pros are storing valuable data on CENTURY DVDs (rated for 60-120 year life with metalic compound dye layer).

     

    Im burning 200+ archival professional grade DVDs a month for self and clients.

     

     

     

    ----------"External drives are dirt cheap and far more reliable than the internal ones"

     

     

    Also not true, an external Superdrive is 100% identical (other than connecting hardware) to an internal superdrive.

     

    Older superdrives were made by Hitachi, current ones by Panasonic.

  • indigopete Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    PlotinusVeritas wrote:

     

    Absolutely INCORRECT.   In terms of media consumption, that is mostly true, ....however in terms of secure data archiving, DVD burning is extremely alive and well.

     

    Well, given that "media consumption" was the main reason they were built in to the body of a Macbook I'd say you've vindicated Apple's policy on removing them with that remark.

     

    This makes DVD archives an unmitigated necessity.

     

    For whom exactly ? A tiny proportion of users that require to archive on high-performance long-life media ? Then you definitely will not want to be doing it on one of Hitachi's ultra-cheap, ultra-unreliable units built into the body of a an ultra-thin Macbook pro.

     

    Yet another reason for using a high-quality external and ditching the internals.

     

    I'm an IT professional and I've not archived anything on DvD for about 10 years because nothing fits on them anymore. A modern basic hard drive is the best part of a terrabyte in size so a DvD will archive how much of it ?

     

     

    0.8 %   !!!!

     

    That is less than 1 percent of your hard drive. The smallest data file I need to archive is about 20 Gb in size so even a single file won't fit.

     

     

    Time to ditch'em !!

  • PlotinusVeritas Level 6 Level 6 (13,695 points)

    Well, given that "media consumption" was the main reason they were built in to the body of a Macbook

     

     

    Thats a false generalization, countless professionals use the DVD burner for archiving "cannot dare lose data" onto professional DVD blank media. 

     

    That the "average joe" is watching netflix now rather than DVD movies doesnt circumvent a PRIME USE POINT of the DVD burner,.....being burning DVD archives which are not subject to ferromagnetic degredation.

     

    indigopete 

    I'm an IT professional and I've not archived anything on DvD for about 10 years because nothing fits on them anymore. A modern basic hard drive is the best part of a terrabyte.....A modern basic hard drive is the best part of a terrabyte in size

     

    Your IT experience is 100% irrelevant to knowledge regarding data archiving and storage.

     

    HD life varies, but barring mechanical failure, 3-8 years typically.

     

     

    Yes, I know a massive amount about HD, I have a 100 of them laying around this house alone.  There are only 4 HD mfg. (conventional) on earth currently, and even the best 2.5" , a Hitachi is a ferromagnetic plate(s) subject to depolarization entropy.

     

    **I never claimed single layer DVD archives 4.7gig was a vessel for "big data", ......

     

    I said the professionals and experts who ponder upon data storage very often are spending fortunes on

    A: tape backup

    B: multiple server backups in various locations......

     

    C: and prosumer (small businesses) users are buying 100s of 1000s of century DVDs (100+ year life) a month for vital data, because they KNOW the NATURE and LONGEVITY of ferromagnetic storage.

     

    In fact, contrary to your position, archival professional DVD blanks are in SUCH HIGH DEMAND, JVC and others cannot keep pace.

     

    I manage a few "big data" collections,......none of them will fit onto 1000s of DVDs, logically, however it is critical that vital data is archived on same, the rest on tape backups and multiple server farms.

     

    Anyone who thinks they can put a valuable data collection, on say "20 2TB HD" and lock it away in a vault for 6, 10,.....etc. years, is not only making a colossal-level error, .....there are also no storage experts who either advocate or agree with such an illogical position.

     

    Yes, 4.7gig is 'small',........however vital data is secure on same for 100+ years. And 470gig of data (100 DVD single layer century blanks) when it comes to documents, texts, word files, PDF, etc. etc., contains a massive amount of data.

     

    470 gig of data on Century disks costs $40 ........  and is not ferromagnetically subject to polarity entropy.....and will last 100+ years.

     

    Name any archival nexus that will store half a Terabyte for 100+ years for anything close to $40 (for that matter, at ANY price).  You cannot

     

     

    indigopete 

    nothing fits on them (DVD) anymore.

     

    One, DVD archival blank alone (not to mention more) will hold a massive ammount of documents, texts, word files, PDF, etc. etc

    .....Most vital data to companies is not large media files (pics, video, music), rather documents, files, low KB-level texts.

     

     

     

    Time to ditch'em  (DVD)!!

     

     

    tell that story to JVC, Verbatim and others who cant crank out enough million archival DVD blanks a month to meet demand for storage from people who, intelligently, will not, should not, cannot, will never trust a ferromagnetic plate(s) for critical data. Tell me how they respond.

     

     

    Peace

  • indigopete Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    PlotinusVeritas wrote:

    countless professionals use the DVD burner for archiving "cannot dare lose data" onto professional DVD blank media.

     

    I think you're in the wrong thread here.

     

    This debate is about the merits (or otherwise) of Apple policy of dropping the internal DvD drive from it's Macbooks. As far as design priorities goes it's a kind of no-brainer to do that because as Macbooks get thinner and thinner, there just isn't any space for them any more (or at least not a reliable one) - added to the fact that their use has probably dropped to about 10% of what it was 10 years ago.

     

    You're debating the merits of backing up on optical rather than magnetic media which is a completely separate subject. You don't need an internal drive to do that any more than you need an internal printer to produce a hard copy of a document.

     

    So, while I accept many of your points about the merits of optical for long term archiving, it doesn't begin to make a case for comprimising all other design priorities just to cram a ruddy great peice of mechanical "junk" with a rotating disk and lots of parts which can go wrong into the body of the machine.

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