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Slow boot on Mac Pro

1265 Views 23 Replies Latest reply: Feb 24, 2014 9:11 AM by The hatter RSS
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NOYBUS Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
Currently Being Moderated
Oct 25, 2013 5:18 PM

I've got a mid-2010 Mac Pro that has a very long boot time.  Here is what it is doing:

 

Power on

Blank screen for 35 sec then boot sound + grey screen

At 1 minute I get the apple

At 1:10 get the spinning circle

At 1:39 get the login icons

 

This seems far far to long for this machine.  It has awesome specs so I would think it is a lot faster:

 

2x6 core CPU's

96GB RAM

1TB SSD boot drive

12 TB internal stripped volume

Two ESATA cards with 5-bay Drobo's on it

Whatever fast video card they came with by default

 

I've tried reducing the ram to 64GB (which was once the source of a problem with an OS upgrade).

I've disconnected the ESATA drives.

I've removed the ESATA cards.

I've reset the PRAM

I've reset the SMC

 

The ESATA cards in particular with the Drobo are VERY slow, so that is why I thought pulling them might resolve the issue (they don't have great support in the Mac Pro, but they do work).

 

I'm at wits end here.  This thing should scream.  My MBP retina 15"  with SSD boots very fast and I would have expected the Mac Pro to boot similarly fast.

 

The SSD is attached to the same cable that the DVD-RW drive is on (i.e. that cable has two heads and the SSD is on one of them).  Could this be the issue?

 

Any help?

  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,110 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 25, 2013 6:33 PM (in response to NOYBUS)

    Got TRIM enabled on that SSD?

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,110 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 26, 2013 8:18 AM (in response to NOYBUS)

    If you just enabled TRIM now, there are one or two more steps you may need to take to get your SSD working fast again.

     

    Especially with third-party SSD drives, Enabling TRIM using something like TRIM Enabler is very important. Despite what one manufacturer says, "it can't hurt".

     

    You will also need to run Disk Utility (Repair Disk) from a different drive that has TRIM Enabler or equivalent installed. This produces the very satisfying message: "Trimming Unused Blocks" and the program pauses for up to a minute while the junk is removed. Drive speed can increase substantially after this operation, because the drive is no longer drowning in deleted data blocks.

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM

     

    The drive may also need a Garbage Collection cycle to set itself right.

     

    What sometimes happens is an SSD drive runs so low on free blocks it cannot function, and appears to go comatose.  After a round (sometimes several rounds) of internal Garbage Collection, the drive has consolidated enough free space and can just barely "come back to life".

     

    The automatic Garbage Collection inside the SSD is allowed to happen when the SSD drive is completely idle. Leave your Mac powered on, running anything (including just the Alt/Option Boot screen), but NOT accessing the SSD drive. After about 20 minutes, the drive will notice that it is idle and start garbage collection. The time may vary by manufacturer, but overnight will certainly do it.

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,110 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 26, 2013 7:42 PM (in response to NOYBUS)

    Still has quite a bit of space free.

    No, that is what Mac OS X says. But it is calculating for Rotating Drives.

     

    Mac OS X deletes a block and adds that block to the Free List (it does not erase it). The amount of reported Free space it reports is adjusted.

     

    Without TRIM, the drive is not notified that the data in that block has been deleted. On a Rotating drive that has blocks pre-allocated and pre-numbered, that is not an issue.

     

    Without TRIM on an SSD, which requires an erased SuperBlock to write anything, it is still carrying the deleted data as if it were good. When a write comes down, it tries to find a Free SuperBlock to write into, and when they run low, it is forced to revert to Read-Modify-Write cycles (much slower) to get anything done.

     

    If you have run a Speed Test, you have written many blocks to your SSD. Unless TRIM is enabled, all that data are still carried along, even though Mac OS X will Never reference them again except to overwrite those blocks (which the SSD does not literally do, it writes a SuperBlock instead).

     

    ------

     

     

    However, when I ran a disk utility repair on the old one mounted in an external ESATA dock, it didn't give the message Trimming unused blocks".

    Enabling TRIM for a specific Drive makes a change in Mac OS X, not in the drive or the Driver that is loaded off the drive. In order to effect the Big TRIM, you would need to have ALSO Installed and Enabled TRIM for that drive on your alternate Mac OS X. TRIM cannot be Installed in a Recovery_HD (at least, not yet).

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,110 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 26, 2013 8:33 PM (in response to NOYBUS)

    I actually ran it on a TRIM enabled system - i.e., the system now has a new Crucial M500 SSD in it for which I enabled TRIM (i.e. enabled TRIM in OSX after I realized I needed to).  I then plugged the old SSD into an ESATA dock and then did the disk repair where I was hoping to see the message "Trimming unused blocks."

    TRIM enabled system is on the right path, but each drive is treated separately. You need to have enabled TRIM for that specific drive, and checked that it was active on that specific drive (sometimes requires a restart).

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,535 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 27, 2013 1:06 PM (in response to NOYBUS)

    Boot from another drive that also has TRIM / Chamelion and run Disk Utility on the other.

  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,535 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 12, 2013 11:35 AM (in response to NOYBUS)

    Your PCIe controller for your eSATA storage.

     

    Stripe may seem to be necessary and make sense but a stripe array is not your safest usual method for backing up.

     

    There are 4TB (and not 2GB) drives out and there will be 6TB drives in 2014.

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