1 7 8 9 10 11 Previous Next 161 Replies Latest reply: Mar 8, 2014 3:18 AM by GalaxieMusique Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • 135. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    the dudexxx Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Just an update....

    If you are going to have to convert your .mov files do them in batches of 4.

     

    If you do 5 or more the imac sometimes hangs....

     

    You can't even force quit because the curser stays in a coloured spinning think mode.....

  • 136. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    the dudexxx Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    ANOTHER GLICH

     

    Ok the mac sometimes when it converts .mov files.

     

    After it converts them some of the thumb nails are missing you have to open the file then the thumb nail appers.

     

    If you then open finder and locate the files you will see once again the thumb nails are missing on some of the nails.

    You have to open the files then close them to keep the thumb nails.

     

    IF YOUR MAC HANGS AND YOU CANT GET FORCE QUIT TO WORK BECAUSE THE MAC IS IN THINK MODE OR WHATEVER THIS IS A FUNNY WORK AROUND..

    IF YOU HAVE DUAL MONITORS YOU CAN GOTO THE APPLE LOGO ON THE SECOND SCREEN AND FORCE QUIT FROM THERE...........

     

    AS I SAID BEFORE THE BEGGINING IF THE END.........

  • 137. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Deborah Terreson Level 3 Level 3 (940 points)

    Use the keys to get Force Quit window up - they are 'command'+'option'+'escape' and it will show.

     

    As to the Mavericks re-encoding - I am not sure where it is, as my main computer is still running Snow Leopard, (and I smack down HARD the QTX on my laptop that I did upgrade, and rolled back to QT 7.6.6 and put in my Pro key) but when the videos go to re-encode, if you make the settings for the conversion to 'pass-through' it doesn't resize the file, it merely puts the correct 'file flags' or some such bit of data on the container - the .mov or .mp4 that the movie is in..

     

    If you dig around, you can find the exact directions, I think they are buried down in this thread.

  • 138. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (17,630 points)

    Use the keys to get Force Quit window up - they are 'command'+'option'+'escape' and it will show.

    Or "Command+Option+Q" to close the QT X app and empty any open player windows and/or conversion in progress.

     

     

    As to the Mavericks re-encoding - I am not sure where it is...

    If referring to the actual converter routine, it appears to now be part in the "Moderizer" embedded at the system level for shared use by apps like QT X, as well as, being independently accessible as a Finder service under Mavericks.

     

    SJAUG.png

  • 139. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Deborah Terreson Level 3 Level 3 (940 points)

    Ah, okay. I think I'll dig out an old file and put it through the QTX ringer and play with the thing.

     

    All in all, I still find most of my time is using the MacBookPro under Snow Leopard.

     

    I just cannot muster the interest to even learn the ins and outs of Mavericks, it has so little that is of actual use for my needs. More's the pity, as I spend a lot of time fixing what it's broken and finding workarounds for the customers I troubleshoot for.

  • 140. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (17,630 points)

    I just cannot muster the interest to even learn the ins and outs of Mavericks, it has so little that is of actual use for my needs. More's the pity, as I spend a lot of time fixing what it's broken and finding workarounds for the customers I troubleshoot for.

    While I consider it interesting to learn about QT X v10.3 and Mavericks itself, like you, I have been and am still using QT 7 Pro v7.6.6 as my default QT player for Snow Leopard, Lion, Mountain Lion and Mavericks and simply don't understand why so many users don't keep both installed and simply use whichever best supports the particular file they want to play at any given time. (I.e., of the approximately 26 TBs of videos currently in my personal library, less than 10 TBs are iTunes managed (QT X v10.3 compatible) while the rest are mostly in QT X v10.3 playback incompatible formats best played using VLC or QT 7 with only about 0.01% in various AVI formats of which about half remain QT X v10.3 compatible since they are MJPEG/PCM AVI files.) For me, it is the results that count and using the right tool for a job assures those results.

     

    SJAUG.png

  • 141. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    the dudexxx Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks Jon Walker.

     

    You've proved my point. you've got different programs to open certain types of files.

     

    You've download quicktime 7 or what ever to open files that could be opened by a apple computer before mavericks upgrades

     

    You've downloaded VLC player to play certain other types of files.

     

    The apple computer today after a mavericks upgrade does not "just work"

     

    Apple are moving away from supporting certain formats so they can no longer be played on a mac, but it was this ability to play other formats which made people turn to apple in the first place.

     

    You now have to download other programs to play basic files.....WHY?

     

    Its not like the old days when memory cost alot and was very small...

    Why not add as many programs or codecs into a system as possible as standard...

     

    And don't say it's not possible because people are going to do it anyway, they are going to go onto the iternet and get VLC and other programs to get there stuff working - the programs are free anyway.......

     

    So why not just include it at the start.....

  • 142. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Deborah Terreson Level 3 Level 3 (940 points)

    I think that it's as Apple is playing the proprietary format game.. as in when you see that iTunes is defaulted to convert CD's to AAC instead of the wider-use .mp3 format - you have to change that setting in the preferences.

     

    Every format that Apple computers includes support for is one more licensing fee they have to pay - hence the departure of Rosetta - that was heavily licensed to the owner of the technology, so once they got far enough away from the Power PC architecture, they kicked it to the curb. (also why I'm STILL using Snow Leopard.)

     

    So now Apple is trying to set their own formats out to play well with their ARM chips on their mobile iThings and most of the A/V code is now deprecated to third-party status.

     

    If you read the tech business papers, there is a LOT of wrangling over various file formats and little of what we think of as 'standard' is actually open source. It all has in one way or another, to be paid for if it is included in an OS.

     

    Mavericks was free, so that right there should tell you it's filled *mostly* with Apple's proprietary code. They make enough on the hardware to not need to skive users for the OS, esp. so if it gives them the ability to move the user-base to their walled-off environment.

     

    As a business decision, I see it.

     

    As a consumer and end-user of the product, I'm.. well.. just blaaah about it all.

  • 143. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Ferrán Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It's not only the proprietary format game, but also the iCloud game, as I explained in previous post: Apple wants that every file you load in your computer can be uploaded to iCloud and downloaded and played on an iPhone or iPad. And those cannot play, f.ex., DivX or Xvid or MKV by default, so they have to be converted to a compatible format, .MOV.

     

    And Apple doesn't have to pay any licenses or copy rights for, f.ex., MKV or Xvid, so that's not the problem, at least on these formats.

     

    Saluditos,

     

    Ferrán.

  • 144. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    the dudexxx Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    OK if its about the cloud then why would apple first take a video file which is say 32.2mb at the start. Buy converting this to play on an apple mac before mavericks installed increased the file size to 82.6mb. After mavericks installed another conversion process was required which increased the size to 175.9 mb almost six times the original file size, but remember "its the same video, no increase in resolution.

    Six times the size in the cloud means six times the download time....

     

    Anyway I know its not the right thread but I think I should mention this.

     

    On mavericks if you have a list of files in a folder and you want to delete some be carefull

     

    The thumb nail "preview" in the cover flow is not always the file that you have highlighted below.

     

    Mavericks has a problem on updating the thumbnail.

     

    You can fix this by going to view button and re-arranging the view agian. this will update the images assossiated with the file.

     

    Talk about appaling pre-testing FINDER...before release.....

  • 145. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    martbr Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    If dudexxx is talking about a file size like 32 MB, then - in my opionion - it is worth to take a look at the history and the current state.

     

    Apple developed QuickTime, QuickTime authoring and QuickTime VR for professional and consumer market - success? Not really. Just take a look at millions of (un-synchronized) movies - even nowadays.

     

    And then they developed iOS (devices) - success? Yes!

     

    Now there is a big fight between the companies who will be the leader in tablet & mobil and computer environment. If you think of millions of users who have these devices - how many have a computer?

     

    Apple is a company, sorry for this useless comment. But times are changing. Now it is about

    1.) Shoot a short video with your tablet & mobil device.

    2.) Trim a little bit if necessary. But only if you have time for this... not really a big interesting point.

    3.) But then - and this is the major point - upload it! Be visible, join community, use services like iCloud. Do not make your data private! Join it!

     

    If I take a look at the updates since 10.7 then I do not see anything usefull. May be I missed something, but I see "only" upgrades to support online services. And to adapt Mac OS X to iOS.

     

    To come back to the point of dudexxx: you are an unusual user. And you do not bring profit, but trouble.

    1.) You have movie files which must be converted. As someone said: millions of users have only MPEG4 or H.264 movie files. And must not convert any movie. And even if they have to: where is the problem?

    2.) Stop talking about problems. Just join & like Apple's plan. If you don't: leave it.

    3.) If you are inbetween then you could use open source software like VLC. And please do not ask why to buy expensive Apple hardware if you use open source software which can be used on any platform (except iOS devices, of course).

     

    Please do not misunderstand me: I would agree to your point of view. But you (and me) are not the people who buy a new iPhone every year (or even less).

     

    And to come back to the original question: this questions is solved. Just install the old QuickTime (and may be extensions like Perian) and everything is working. We should proceed this discussion with the next version of Mac OS X where Apple might not support QuickTime for 32 bit.

  • 146. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (17,630 points)

    Thanks Jon Walker.

     

    You've proved my point. you've got different programs to open certain types of files.

    You shouldn't thank me too soon since you are totally missing my point. Previously, the embedded multimedia structure consisted of what might be called a dual 64-bit and a 32-bit QuickTime structure. On the other hand, Mavericks seems to have two separate multimedia structures—the AVFoundation/Moderizer/Convert system-wide shared structure that supports QT X based applications, as well as the Finder and the other is the 32-bit QuickTime structure that still supports QuickTime based applications like the QT 7 Player/QT 7 Pro Players. I.e, the 64-bit QT structure no longer exists. Your argument appears falacious since it is based on the assumption that the 64-bit "QuickTime" still exists under Mavericks and and you insist on using "the wrong tool" for your content playback. To me, this seems tantamount to a person being given a car with a diesel engine, then complaining that it doesn't run on gasoline and insisting the provider take back the vehicle and replace the engine before you will accept the gift.

     

     

    You've download quicktime 7 or what ever to open files that could be opened by a apple computer before mavericks upgrades

    Actually, you are mistaken here also. QT 7 Pro was installed on my Leopard system before I upgraded to Snow Leopard. In fact, I continued to find the app so useful—especially under Lion when Apple turned for the legacy codecs, that I decided to install it on the iMac when I purchased it and migrated the FCP Suite to the new system, which, of course, automtically keyed the the QT 7 v7.6.6 Player for "Pro" use, allowing me to finally use the free key rather than the purchased key which I left on the old system when I gave it to my wife Your main problem is that you seem to insisting that QT X v10.3 should be a "universal" media player capable of handling any and all forms of compressed data. THERE IS NO SUCH ANIMAL! If you thouroughly test any given media player app, sooner or later you will find there is something that it cannot handle. So, yes, I do have QT 7 v7.6.6 Pro still installed on my Mavericks system because it's one of many possible "right tools" for the playback of certain files and the "right tool" for track-level editing, masking. and/or application of filters still available under Mavericks. I also have MPEG Streamclip installed because it is a better tool to quickly merging multiple files using a simple "drag 'n drop" workflow whereas QT 7 or QT X would simply open multiple player windows.

     

     

    You've downloaded VLC player to play certain other types of files.

    This is also true for many reasons. Primarily, I use the MKV file container for the storage of Blu-ray encoded content and have made VLC the default player for this combination of compressed data and file container. Since it takes QT 7 forever to open and read 20, 30, or 40 GB files to find he valid EOF marker before attemptin to play the file (which both QT X v10.3 and QT 7 v7.6.6 do poorly), it only seemed logical to use "a better tool" for such playback. In addition, the Apple DVD player no konger seems to like my "image" DVD files but VLC has no problem with them. Unfortunately, VLC doesn't handle to all BD content—especially 1080i VC-1 encoded discs, so I also have a dedicated software BD media player installed for BD playback directly from the disc. So, yes, I do have a multitude of media players installed on my system because each has capabilities that may or may not be shared by the others. Or as I attempted to explain previously, I have adopted a philosophy of using "the right tool of the right job" while you you keep insisting that QT X v10.3 is "the correct tool" for you to use whether or not it is still actually programmed to support the files you want to play.

     


    The apple computer today after a mavericks upgrade does not "just work"

     

    You seem to be under the misconception that, in an age of techical consolidation and specializatiio, Apple has choosen to "buck current trends" and devote its expertise to the development of a universal multimedia player that supports heretofore unsupported codec components, as well as, disregarding the obvious consolidation of their own natively supported codecs. Each of the last three operating system upgrades clearly point in the opposite direction no matter how hard to choose to ignore the facts that are staring you in the face.. Software seldom works corectly if you use it incorectly. If you wish to play files supported by the AVFoundation, then use QT X v10.3 under Mavericks. If you wish to play files supported by the embedded QT structure, then use the QT 7 v7.6.6 Player. Apple has prvided a workflow that still works. Whether or not you use is strictly up to you.

     

     

    Apple are moving away from supporting certain formats so they can no longer be played on a mac, but it was this ability to play other formats which made people turn to apple in the first place.

    More obfuscations based on a lack of research, lack of user testing, and HOW YOU THINK QTX v10.3 should work rather than how it actually does work in reality. Your statement might have more weight if you specified the compression formats to which you are referring. Many/most AVIs require third-party support for proper playack Such files may never have been supported by Apple or may have been dropped by their distributer back as far a OS 8 when they decided to develope their own, more modern codecs. (I still miss the MPEG-1 compression codec auto-installed by Toast a decade or more ago but which ws automatically deleted when the system no longeer would support it  under the newer OSs and/or QT "Pro" app Pro versions.

     

     

    You now have to download other programs to play basic files.....WHY?

    Same reason as always.. You must play the file in an app that supports both "the current form of data contained in the file" and uses a file type that is that is current;y compatible with the player you are using—not an app that used to play it under last operating system system or the system before that.

     

     

    Its not like the old days when memory cost alot and was very small...

    Why not add as many programs or codecs into a system as possible as standard...

    Again, what does this mean to you? Are you suggesting that Apple steal and make use of proprietary technogy as in the case that Apple just won.?  While Windows, DivX, XviD, 3ivX, the latest Sorrenson codecs, Flash, etc. are now being sold directly by Mac users (if still supported). But why, pray tell, would anyone  take on the headack of supportig  someone else's proprietary or non-public domain codec components, adapt them to use on the Mac, and then wait around for the federal governmnet to fine them. (Sounds like sombody would have to be pretty dense to do this. (Perhaps you would like to take on this job?) Frankly, I am more concerned the consolidation of the Apple Animation and AIC, DV, etc., stream codecs which still seem to be supported by iMovie (if I choose tto use it). Luckily I switched to an HDV camcorter several years ago so to aerve as my lo low-efficiency archive format directly from my camcorder and am not really interested in moving to super-high compression format like AVCHD. (Again, this is a personal choice for me and you are welcome to use whatever codecs and playyou prefer.)

     

     

    And don't say it's not possible because people are going to do it anyway, they are going to go onto the iternet and get VLC and other programs to get there stuff working - the programs are free anyway.......

    I wouldn't think of it. Many uers (since the days of the Fifth Generayion iPod) have uswd apps and utilities to try an e,bed headers that will allow you to play non-standard frofil, level, and  feature combinations. You may get way with iy for a while. bu sooner or later Aplple may slasm this door in your facwe with a security update.

     


    So why not just include it at the start.....

     

    You really should look into the legal ramificaions of your suggestions. On 11/21/13, Apple was awarded $290.45 million dollars from Samsung in the latest parent litigation retrail. (Apple asked for $397.8 million but Samsumng only offered $52.7 million) after they initially lost awrderd a $600 millilion dollars settlement to Apple by the District last Maech. She later ruled that there were some errors in calculating the $600 million dollar award., and ordered a retrail. So how much should Apple put you down for Apple's defense andor the ultimate fine if Apple should follow your suggestions?

     

    SJAUG.png

  • 147. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    martbr Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Mavericks seems to have two separate multimedia structures—the AVFoundation/Moderizer/Convert system-wide shared structure that supports QT X based applications, as well as the Finder and the other is the 32-bit QuickTime structure that still supports QuickTime based applications like the QT 7 Player/QT 7 Pro Players

    I am astonished - because many people did complain that the Finder does not have a 32-bit QuickTime structure now with Mavericks and thereby the Finder can not show incompatible movies with QuickLook. Did I miss anything?

     

    May be you mean the operation system which can emulate 32 bit routines?

    the 64-bit QT structure no longer exists

    It did never exist, not "no longer"!

    To me, this seems tantamount to a person being given a car with a diesel engine, then complaining that it doesn't run on gasoline and insisting the provider take back the vehicle and replace the engine before you will accept the gift.

    Great example! Remembers me with something Mr. Gates tried to mention: http://mistupid.com/jokes/msvgm.htm. Long ago! And still a running gag...

    Your main problem is that you seem to insisting that QT X v10.3 should be a "universal" media player capable of handling any and all forms of compressed data. THERE IS NO SUCH ANIMAL!

    Yes, there were and still is such an animal. It is called QuickTime (32 bit) with Perian and WMV as extension. It is an animal - eating (aka playing) "everything".

    If you thouroughly test any given media player app, sooner or later you will find there is something that it cannot handle

    Yes, of course. Even VLC sometimes failes to play movies and hangs. One reason for me to prefer the old QT Player (or applications based on old QT). Never had these problems...

    the Apple DVD player no konger seems to like my "image" DVD files but VLC has no problem with them. Unfortunately, VLC doesn't handle to all BD content—especially 1080i VC-1 encoded discs, so I also have a dedicated software BD media player installed for BD playback directly from the disc. So, yes, I do have a multitude of media players installed on my system because each has capabilities that may or may not be shared by the others.

    You are a lucky user. And you explained this to your family? "Please learn how to handle different movie types?" Lucky one! My family told me to trash that idea. They told me: one application to launch any movie...

    while you keep insisting that QT X v10.3 is "the correct tool" for you to use whether or not it is still actually programmed to support the files you want to play.

    And this is the current state for millions of users. How many people have the problems you have? Blu-ray, but no AVI files?

    If you wish to play files supported by the AVFoundation, then use QT X v10.3 under Mavericks. If you wish to play files supported by the embedded QT structure, then use the QT 7 v7.6.6 Player. Apple has prvided a workflow that still works. Whether or not you use is strictly up to you.

    Correct - and thereby the original question is solved. Until Apple offers a new Mac OS X version and will not  support 32-bit (QuickTime).

    Your statement might have more weight if you specified the compression formats to which you are referring.

    This has been ask before - and someone posted a list of incompatible formats. Quite long in opposite to the compatible formats...

    Such files may never have been supported by Apple

    This argument has been said over and over again: BUT Apple made QT open by offering the extension feature…

    more modern codecs

    As who decides? Apple? If you ask people for making a list of compression formats, would you please make a list for us which codecs are modern and why? For the next 2 years, please. May be I convert all my movies as Apple likes now - and then in 2 years there is a new - more modern codec - and Apple does not like it.

     

    In the past, QT was extendible. But now it is Apple who decides - this is the point for me.

    MPEG-1… which ws automatically deleted when the system no longeer would support it  under the newer OSs app Pro versions

    I am surprised: MPEG-1 is not supported anymore? I can still play it with QuickTime 32 bit and the installed extensions.

    You may get way with iy for a while. bu sooner or later Aplple may slasm this door in your facwe with a security update.

    Yes, indeed. Be prepared that Apple will close doors. As I said: join it & like it - or leave it.

  • 148. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    nessviewer Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The original questions, asked by GalaxieMusique, was how to prevent conversion. This question is solved: just install the old QuickTime and may be some extensions (Perian and WMV), and everything works as before.

     

    Okay - not everything. May be some features are lost (QuickLook?).

     

    And then there is a more or less "emotional" discussion what Apple did in the past, what they are doing now and what they might do in the future.

     

    Apple developed a very "rich" technology called QuickTime. This technology was open minded: other developers and companies were able to extend this technology by their own codecs. One example is Flip4Mac from Microsoft (WMV), another is Perian or DivX.

     

    Many years ago we decided to develop our applications based on Apple technology aka QuickTime. There were a discussion if another solution would be to use open source movie playback, but we liked the idea to develop applications which are based on system technology.

     

    We liked Front Row, Preview, DVD Player and QuickTime Pro - and the idea was to develop an application which has all these features in one application - plus some extra features we were (and are) missing.

     

    Now Apple decided to deprecate QuickTime and to prefer "AV Foundation". QuickTime is very old - so the idea to refresh it and develop a new framework is a good idea.

     

    With Mavericks, our 64 bit applications can now even analyse for the first time if a movie is compatible or not - and can offer the conversion. This was impossible before.

     

    So far so good. What we do not like: downgrading a Apple computer to features well known from iOS. With AV Foundation on Mac OS X there are currently some major downgrades:

     

    1.) With QuickTime, it was possible to copy a selection of a movie (or a track) and to paste this into a new movie. With AV Foundation, this is imposssible. Of course, several movie files can be joined and then parts can be deleted. But even if this is workaround, there are still some problems (or may be better called less options). QuickTime Pro users will see this problem...

    2.) With QuickTime, it was possible to export / convert movies with very detailed parameters. With AV Foundation, there are only a few parameters. One reason why converting movies increases file size  to 1/3 to triple.

     

    These are two reasons why we still prefer our 32 bit applications, but have the 64 bit applications as options for the future.

     

    If we think about Apple, who needed 3 Mac OS X versions (10.7 to 10.9) to develop something like QTMovieModernizer to recognize and convert movies, then we still hope that Apple will listen to this (and many other) discussion and will extend AV Foundation.

     

    So we would like to suggest: please calm down and wait for new features Apple will bring. This is what they did for so many years...

  • 149. Re: QuickTime convert .avi to .mov with OS X Mavericks
    Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (17,630 points)

    I am astonished - because many people did complain that the Finder does not have a 32-bit QuickTime structure now with Mavericks and thereby the Finder can not show incompatible movies with QuickLook. Did I miss anything?

     

    May be you mean the operation system which can emulate 32 bit routines?

    I don't know about your system but the QT 7/QT 7 Pro app on my system under Mavericks is still a 32-bit app:

     

    Screen Shot 2013-12-13 at 9.48.47 PM.png

    As to QL, I said nothing about it. And, yes, you still seem to be missing the fact that it is a technology related to but separate from QT.

     

     

    It did never exist, not "no longer"!

    How strange! My Snow Leopard (pre-AVFoundation) system still insistes that that the QT X v10.0 player is a 64-bit app supported by a 64-bit embeded structure just as QT X v10.3 remains a 64-bit app as supported by the 64-bit AVFoundation.

     

     

    Yes, there were and still is such an animal. It is called QuickTime (32 bit) with Perian and WMV as extension. It is an animal - eating (aka playing) "everything".

    Didn't you just get through telling me there was no shich thing as a 32-bit version of QT a few paragraphs ago? Also, as far as I know no Indeo codec has been availal for use with any Mac OS X system configuration. Also, while QT plus Flip4Mac does support 1080i VC-1 playback, it does not do so whithout superimposing a "Windows Media" icon on the playback display—just two examples of an animal that does not "eat everything" as you seem to imply.

     

     

    Yes, of course. Even VLC sometimes failes to play movies and hangs. One reason for me to prefer the old QT Player (or applications based on old QT). Never had these problems...

    I suggest you expand your "old QT Player" test criteria and revise your statement.

     

     

    You are a lucky user. And you explained this to your family? "Please learn how to handle different movie types?" Lucky one! My family told me to trash that idea. They told me: one application to launch any movie...

    Sorry, I fail to understand the point you are try to make here. My point was that I require a vast number tools to best analyze and process content. Perhaps your needs are much more modest than mine or you need to explain the complexities involved to your family in better terms.

     

     

    And this is the current state for millions of users. How many people have the problems you have? Blu-ray, but no AVI files?

    Once again, what is your point? I consider Blu-ray a much more modern tecnology than AVI files using legacy, proprietary, or hybrid/non-standard codecs in a container requiring patches work properly. As to AVI files, they represent only a very small and somewhat limited facit of all possible forms of multimedia and, while I personally do not often create AVI content, I do perform problem analysis for others. As to millions of users, where are they? I only see a small number of very vocal AVI users who either do not create their own AVI files or are actually Windows users who for some inexplicable reason are using a Mac platform.

     

     

    Correct - and thereby the original question is solved. Until Apple offers a new Mac OS X version and will not support 32-bit (QuickTime).

    And so your argument now shifts to hypotheticals rather than facts. So what if it does happen? I merely replace QT 7 with VLC as my default media player for AVI files, use HandBreak as my default conversion app and continue with my current workflows—both of which are apps already installed on and in use on my Mavericks system and which employ codec packages that are independent of QT and the operating system. Oh, my... so many decisions and so little time to make them. But then, I am getting ahead of myself aren't I? As an elderly retired person I find it is often a waste my time to speculate on what may happen rather than concentrating on what has happened. If you have a different perspective then you are welcome to it.

     

     

    This has been ask before - and someone posted a list of incompatible formats. Quite long in opposite to the compatible formats...

    If you reread the comment you will note that is was directled to a specific individual in order to determine his specific problem, You, on the other hand, are trying to turn the comment into a question and apply it to a general problem for your own purposes.

     

     

    This argument has been said over and over again: BUT Apple made QT open by offering the extension feature…

    Yes, and most people applauded the open nature of this architecture. And, maybe, some day Apple will return to this mode of thinking. Unfortunately, if you continue to live in the past rather than the present, you are likely to ignore most, if not all, of the possible solutions/workarounds. IMHO, people with closed minds are seldom ever satisfied.

     

     

    As who decides? Apple? If you ask people for making a list of compression formats, would you please make a list for us which codecs are modern and why? For the next 2 years, please. May be I convert all my movies as Apple likes now - and then in 2 years there is a new - more modern codec - and Apple does not like it.

     

    In the past, QT was extendible. But now it is Apple who decides - this is the point for me.

    Duh! Apple is performing the the research and development. Apple is doing the programming. Of couse it is making these decisions. Compression formats are normally considered modern if they are highly scaleable (have data rates that can be used for multiple purposes from cell phone use to 2- or 4-K optical media use and everything in between), support anamorphic encoding strategies without patches, and are compatible with modern containers which also do not require patches for proper use. They do not generally include codecs developed two decades ago to target a specic or limited use which may or may not have been abandoned by their originator and are unsupported at the current time.

     

    As to Apple developing or switching to a newr technology in the future, that may very well be. However, It is more likely that such a change would be a minumum of  6 to 10 years away and assumes that current modern formats cannot inclucle addition profiles and/or levels which include features required to support whatever tecnological advance you envision. But what of it. Apple mobile devices originally only supported MPEG-4/H.264 video at 320x240 resolutions. The same codecs now support 2-K content using higher profiles and levels with added encoding features. Therefore, it is currently just as reasonable to expect that such codecs will continue in use much longer than you hypothesize as it is to say they will change based on the generality that technology is constantly evolving.

     

     

    I am surprised: MPEG-1 is not supported anymore? I can still play it with QuickTime 32 bit and the installed extensions.

    And I am surprised that you are not familiar with the MPEG-1 encoder that used to be installed by Toast that was compatible with QT Pro just as Apple's FCP used to install a QT Pro compatible MPEG-2 encoder. Either your youth or your lack of experience is showing.

     

     

    Yes, indeed. Be prepared that Apple will close doors. As I said: join it & like it - or leave it.

    That is one way of putting it. Another is that those of use who adopted MPEG-4/MPEG-4 AVC as our defualt distributopn compression format 8 years ago don't seem compelled to do either.

     

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