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Color to B&W?

372 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Dec 18, 2013 11:07 AM by ysense RSS
ysense Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
Dec 13, 2013 5:08 AM

Hello everyone,

I made some shots with Canon D-5 ii (full HD). I transfered the video files to Apple ProRes422 and I'm working on FC 7 for editing.

I'd like to create a B&W version of my project. The first thing I tried was to use the color correction under effects and take saturation all the way down. As it is, I don't like it very much. I have a feeling that there are better ways to get good B&W out of colors. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

ysense

OS X Mavericks (10.9)
  • Shane Ross Level 8 Level 8 (41,655 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2013 10:08 AM (in response to ysense)

    Best way is to Desaturate.  But then you need to do some "color" grading...if you want things to look richer, then you need to crush the blacks, push the whites a little...make the slope between them steeper. Sorry, this is colorist talk.  But basically lower the blacks to make them darker, pump the mids or brights to brighten the image in the highlights. 

  • RatVega™ Level 4 Level 4 (1,855 points)
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    Dec 13, 2013 11:56 PM (in response to ysense)

    Shane's advice is (of course) excellent.

     

    You have two options to achieve this end: the Color Corrector 3-Way filter (allows grading from within FCP) and Color (you can round-trip from FCP for serious grading.)

     

    The advantage to Color Corrector 3-Way is it's fast and relatively easy. It's even possible to de-sat the entire with a single filter if you use a nest. The downside is it's 8-bit and lacks the control of Color.

     

    The advantage to Color are pretty much the inverse of Color Corrector 3-Way...  full-on color grading that frankly scares a lot of guys.

     

    Hope this helps

  • Jim Cookman Level 7 Level 7 (23,435 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 15, 2013 4:47 AM (in response to ysense)

    NEXT time, take two monitors to your shoot, tweak one down to black and white, and light your shots using that monitor.  You can get some stunning results.

  • RatVega™ Level 4 Level 4 (1,855 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 15, 2013 3:48 PM (in response to Jim Cookman)

    Jim Cookman wrote:

     

    NEXT time, take two monitors to your shoot, tweak one down to black and white, and light your shots using that monitor.  You can get some stunning results.

    Doesn't that presuppose that one monitor was used the last time out?    

    A lot of the guys I get would say "what monitor?" 

     

    Excellent idea none the less...

  • RatVega™ Level 4 Level 4 (1,855 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 16, 2013 7:54 AM (in response to ysense)

    I'm thinking it will depend on the camera; some of the advanced cams have non-linear "cinegamma" settings that mimic film.

     

    The brilliance of Jim's suggestion is that it gives you better control in general and may may allow you to develop your own settings (depending on the camera you're using.)

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