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Transfer ultraviolet digital copy dvd to iTunes, not Flixster?

478842 Views 425 Replies Latest reply: Mar 22, 2014 11:40 AM by arkling RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • bradleydelliott Calculating status...

    The whole movie industry is at fault including iTunes.  I understand that everyone wants to make money... Once you understand that, you sart to realize part of the issue(s).  I like buying the blu rays with the iTunes download.  I think that's why this thread is getting so much attention.  I would not even mind if I had a UV account, but I have all apple products and don't think it's "right" to have to buy they movie again for the price Apple is wanting... I think this falls back to the movie studio's.  Apple has a great delivery system and they feel like they need get the benifits to that.  **** I would pay and extra $3-$5 for the iTunes copy with the BluRay+DVD being $20 as example... I am looking up Despicable Me 2... no BluRay with iTunes download.  I will wait.

  • andysol Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Despicable Me 2 does have an iTunes copy.

  • UVSUX Calculating status...

    The following is my opinion, experience with and my limited understanding of the service called UV. As an apple consumer it seems that UV is a collosal farce and waste of time. Flixter is no longer sending iTunes codes to the best of my knowledge. It was done in the beginning because UV didnt work for too many users at all.

         UV seems to have a different player for each studio/streaming provider and I believe requires registration of each and every single device with a limit on the number of devices (12 devices per household of up to 6 users). So every iPad, iPhone and iPod and Mac or microsoft/crome device requires its own software player and registration. Register them all with each and every studio/streaming service. Now keep track of all the passwords. It requires a uv account and another account and password for every studio (sony, WB, Universal etc.). Another download for each player. I tried to install some microsoft player on my mac (yes microsh_t) from the studios website which of course was out of date, didnt work and required hours of research to remove. I have dozens of uv codes that I have stopped redeeming as I have not been able to use one yet. SONY is going to BOOT ME from UV because I haven't (can't) used the UV service with them for 1 year. I quote "the Sony Pictures Store will deactivate and remove accounts which have not had any activity in the past twelve months", but they say I can still use other UV services. When is the last time iTunes said they would remove you because you didnt stream a movie for 12 months of time.

         Dont try to sell your UV code as thats illegal and they will come after you. Just give them away. It also seems that the right to download the movie free may actually expire after a relatively short time. UV is a great idea but the absolute worst implementation I could ever envision. If it had been one player/registration like iTunes I would have bought into it. It is not. I have stopped buying all Blu ray titles that ship with UV only and not also digital. It appears that UNIVERSAL is one of the rare studios that lets you redeem the UV title also as an iTunes digial copy so my hat is off to them and I continue to buy their titles. I have been buying the UV digital copy only titles "used" after release (usually for a lot less than new) or not at all. The used blu-ray's usually dont come with the UV code but I dont care about scrap paper. It sounds like my friends are all doing the same. It is the only way to let what I think are the greedy studios feel my dissapointment but I fear the microsoft lemmings are too **** numerous for my small BOYCOTT to have any effect. The lemmings must like pain and suffering more than I do. I refuse to pay for something I dont get and UV is definitely one of those things. If the streaming provider goes out of business you can no longer stream/download the file even if you have a licence to do so. UV wants to strike the right balance between the owners of the copyrighted material and the consumers. I believe their failure is EPIC.

  • MaxumisToo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    No, you can't have a pony.

  • JCC123 Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

    UVSUX wrote:

     

         Dont try to sell your UV code as thats illegal and they will come after you. Just give them away.

     

    Why would it be illegal? You bought it just like the blu-ray so you own the rights to it?  That's like saying that you can't resell your DVDs/Blu-rays.

     

    Also, I happen to like UV. I only needed to download and use Vudu as my preferred UV player and access point just like iTunes. It's by far the best of the three choices (Vudu, Flixster, Cinemanow). Once you link your Vudu to UV, you don' ever have to go to UV at all. Nor do you need to use or link to any other providers as you suggest.

     

    From Vudu, you can stream or download to any of your devices. Normally, I just stream.  It works even better than Netflix.

     

    If you don't want your UV codes I'd be happy to buy the titles I want off of you, let me know if you're interested and we can make it happen with PayPal.

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (73,395 points)

    UVSUX wrote:

     

         Dont try to sell your UV code as thats illegal and they will come after you. Just give them away.

     

    JCC123 responded:

    Why would it be illegal?

    Because he is not also selling the DVD with the UV code together, as one package.

    2 people are getting a movie (one on DVD dn the other on UV) when only one was purchased.

  • UVSUX Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I glad that UV works fo you. I have no objection to UV for those that like it. I just wish more studios were like Universal and offered a choice. It doesnt work conveniently for me and I want the choice just like you do. I like to actually put movies and TV shows on 2 different laptops and and 4 different iPads plus stream to the 3 apple TV's. Your method is fine if you stream everything which I never ever do. The procedure to add and remove each device (to store the file on not to stream) is complicated. If you loose more than 2 devices (of the 6 you are allowed) a year you are not able to replace them as they are unverified removals.  I found a different registration for each device with different software and each and every studio to be a hastle.

     

    If you look at the service agreement with UV it is expressly forbidden to sell the UV code that comes with a dvd so its just not worth it to sell it. The UV police will get me!

  • JCC123 Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

    Chris CA wrote:

     

    UVSUX wrote:

     

         Dont try to sell your UV code as thats illegal and they will come after you. Just give them away.

     

    JCC123 responded:

    Why would it be illegal?

    Because he is not also selling the DVD with the UV code together, as one package.

    I have never had problems buying or selling codes. It probably won't hold up in court as people pay extra to have the extra formats.

  • bradleydelliott Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It's called a contract... you buy this you are agreeing to the contract.... I would never just buy a digital copy from 3rd party......

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (73,395 points)

    JCC123 wrote:

    I have never had problems buying or selling codes.

    Doesn't mean it is legal (as UCSUX noted).

     

    It probably won't hold up in court as people pay extra to have the extra formats.

    You don't pay extra for the codes. They come with the DVD.

  • bailey#70 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    You don't "own" the Blu Ray, the movie or the codes, you purchased a license to use the content provided in the manner intended by the publisher and as described in any small print on the packaging. As to what that means in law in any particular country... I seem to recall that here in the UK it has always been (or at least was) technically illegal to re-sell or re-distribute anything like this anyway (it used to say so in the small print on the packaging). On the one hand I'm not a lawyer but on the other hand can only ever recall prosecutions for blatant piracy and the authorities here generally turned a blind eye to sharing among family and friends.

     

    Back on topic though, while the people on here who have grown to like UV are entitled to their opinions I'm afraid I'm still formly in the iTunes camp. I've invested a lot of time and effort in my iTunes library (both audio and video) as well as in Apple TV and just think it stinks that Hollywood (with the noted exceptions such as Universal) have decided to give us the finger in this way.

     

    In an ideal world the studios would do what they used to and provide a code which could be redeemed once only for the users' preferred digital format or alternatively not provide one in the first place or even just provide a discount code to be used in the relevant on-line store. Instead we're now in a situation where you often cannot buy a Blu Ray that does not have a digital code, where you often used to be able to get the disk-only pack for a little less money purchasers are now effectively being forced to buy a digital copy (don't say it's free, there's no such thing as free) that they may not even use and I refuse to do that. As a concequence I'm spending a lot more money in the iTunes store and virtually nothing in the stores or on Amazon.

     

    I suspect that what we have here is a repeat of the Blu Ray vd HD-DVD war (or VHS vs Betamax or Atari vs Commodore for those of us who remember that far back). I still have a great collection of Laserdiscs here that will be unplayable if my player ever breaks and I'd rather not go down that road again.

  • JCC123 Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

    You can write whatever you want in a license.  That doesn't mean that it's legal or can stand up to court challeneges. The fact that you haven't seen the normally litigious RIAA go after anyone is because precisly this.

     

    When you buy a copy of something copyrighted, it's yours to do as you want.  I know the courts have continuually upheld this in the past with physical goods.  The jury is out on digital goods.  I'm sure the RIAA would love nothing than to exclude digital goods from these existing laws but they're probably hesitant at this point of setting a precident in the courts which would destroy their rights to limit and control digital goods in the foreseeable future.

     

    There are a lot of nuanaced characteristics in copyright laws.  I know that one sticking point that the copyright holders have made in the past has been that digital goods are not the same as physical goods such as books, DVDs, or Bluray discs in that it does not degrade.  Hence, existing copyright laws and courst case in favor of allowing anyone who puchased a physical good to do what they want with it doesn't apply. Like I said, I don't think there's been a definative answer as of yet. Cases are still being decided.

     

    As far as not paying for a digital copy with your existing DVD/Blu-ray, you guys couldn't be further from the truth.  The fact of the matter is that you ARE paying extra for the extras.  If you buy just the Blu-ray, it's one price.  If you want a DVD and a digital copy to go along with that it's a higher price.  If you havn't noticed the different tierd pricing structure you must be blind.  So, you are in fact paying for your digital copy. The studios are just smart to try to hide the fact by bundling it.

     

    It seems that many of you havne't noticed which was exactly their intent.

  • JCC123 Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

    In an ideal world the studios would do what they used to and provide a code which could be redeemed once only for the users' preferred digital format or alternatively not provide one in the first place or even just provide a discount code to be used in the relevant on-line store. Instead we're now in a situation where you often cannot buy a Blu Ray that does not have a digital code, where you often used to be able to get the disk-only pack for a little less money purchasers are now effectively being forced to buy a digital copy (don't say it's free, there's no such thing as free) that they may not even use and I refuse to do that. As a concequence I'm spending a lot more money in the iTunes store and virtually nothing in the stores or on Amazon.

     

    I suspect that what we have here is a repeat of the Blu Ray vd HD-DVD war (or VHS vs Betamax or Atari vs Commodore for those of us who remember that far back). I still have a great collection of Laserdiscs here that will be unplayable if my player ever breaks and I'd rather not go down that road again.

     

    I think at this point you need to accept the fact that there will be 2 formats. Apple and UV.  Apple is not the same as UV because UV doesn't sell the media but allows 3rd parties to do so.  UV merely keeps track of what you own.  Apple is more analgous to Amazon in that they're selling media that's only compatible with their own system and not open to other resellers.  I noticed that Apple movies and TV shows are almost always overpriced.  I'm happy to shop UV enabled stores such as Vudu or Cinemanow for digital copies when they have sales.  Right now, for example, you can buy $4.99 movies on Vudu.  Try finding that on iTunes!

     

    Perhaps one day Apple will join the UV consortium but I won't bet on that so just continue to use both.  Actually, I think UV is winning this war. I've been seeing more and more UV codes than iTunes codes. One of the killer features for UV is the fact that you can convert your old media to digital for a small nominal fee.  I've converted 80% of my DVDs( hundreds of DVDs) over to HD UV licenses for only $2.50/each.  This allows you to skip a step - no need to upgrade to Bluray. You can't do that at Apple. That's another reason why UV is winning because it allows consumers an upgrade path unlike previous generations of media where you're stuck, like your LaserDiscs. I've seen so many people upgrade their old DVD collections to HD digital for only $2.50 (just checkout all those people who are selling hundreds of DVDs in their collections all at once on eBay to get an idea what i'm talking about).  It's fantastic.  At this point I'm willing to bet that the people who are using UV have much larger collections then those using iTunes just because of the fact that they have been migrating their DVDs.  If you visit the Vudu forum for example, there are people who have thousands of movies on UV now just because they've converted all of their DVDs over.  This means that they're more willing to continue to invest into this system.  I think Apple needs to improve or they will lose, that is, if they haven't lost already.

  • Irongabe Calculating status...

    You can transfer it to itunes got Rise of the Guardians and i just put the code in the redeem section of itunes and it worked

  • Zoumbo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Since you pay for a package embedding a dvd and a code, you pay both, the dvd AND the code.

    Free products come alone, 20% free in the box is a tale, you paid it, you own it, you can sell it.

     

    The robery comes from the companies, made legal by their power as slavery was legal in the past.

     

    A consumer buying a film licence shoud be able to use it in any condition. A digital copy should be available on Apple TV directly from my iPad since I paid for it whoever is the provider.

     

    No technocal issue her, it works natively, companies just miss the legal constrainsts to give what they've been paid.

     

    People vote for the laws, not the companies.

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