5 Replies Latest reply: Feb 23, 2014 11:30 PM by babylonslim
brandon_4385 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hey guys. I'm a newbie to the boards here but I just currently purchased a Canon Rebel 1100D that shoots video in 30 fps or 25 fps and using Final Cut Pro X for editing.

 

I know getting the film look is shooting in 24 fps and I definitely want that same look here.

 

I'm working on a short film and want to know is it better to shoot video in 30 fps then convert to 24 fps OR just shoot in 25 fps and convert to 24 fps?

 

Any tips on what is best is cool with me. I'm a newbie, so be kind if possible!


Final Cut Pro X, OS X Mavericks (10.9.1)
  • 1. Re: Shooting video in 25 fps. Is it best to convert to 24 fps in FCP X?
    Karsten Schlüter Level 7 Level 7 (29,885 points)

    brandon_4385 wrote:

    …  I know getting the film look is shooting in 24 fps ...

    sorry to say that, but that is (silly) wrong.

     

    You get a film-look with 25 or 30fps too ... ok, Mr.Jackson failed to create a film-look with 48fps - but that is another story...

     

     

    Film Look:

    the low frame-rate allows to create 'natural motion blurr', which is the main ingredience of 'film look'; watch any Hollywood blockbuster - any frame shows blurred areas.

     

    why?

    Because 24fps allows - based upon the 180° rule - a low shutter speed of 1/48th sec.

    You know from photography: slow shutter speed = blurred.

     

    So, set your cam to 25fps AND speed to 1/50th - probably you have to use a small aperture number, which leeds to the next problem:

     

    (actual) Film-Look shows shallow Depth-of-Field - which asks, you learned as a photographer, for a wide open aperture...

     

    so, how to accomplish that?

    use ND-filters!

    I have a cheap one, which is modifiable - just turn it, and its from 50-400 (or something) - very handy

     

    ________

     

    finally…

    After perfect lighting, using correct settings, you add:

    grading (such as popular teal'n orange), add artificial grain, apply tons of light-leaks/lens flares (greetings to Mr Abrams ) = film look.

     

    but not '24fps' vs. 25fps ... that's nonsense.-

  • 2. Re: Shooting video in 25 fps. Is it best to convert to 24 fps in FCP X?
    brandon_4385 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks Karsten for the reply. I am new to cinematography somewhat.

     

    On my DSLR, Canon Rebel 1100D the shutter speed is automatic and you cannot set it.

     

    Still though, should my 25 fps shots be converted or saved to 24 fps output in Final Cut Pro or Compressor?

  • 3. Re: Shooting video in 25 fps. Is it best to convert to 24 fps in FCP X?
    babylonslim Level 2 Level 2 (310 points)

    Shoot at 25, edit at 25. It will be fine. Tho Karsten mixed in the 180 degree rule (which has nothing to do with frame rate/shutter speed) she wound up at the correct end. 24 fps vs. 25 will produce imperceptible differences.

     

    There is so much more involved with creating film/video art than a shallow depth of field/blurred movememet.

  • 4. Re: Shooting video in 25 fps. Is it best to convert to 24 fps in FCP X?
    Karsten Schlüter Level 7 Level 7 (29,885 points)

    brandon_4385 wrote:

    ... On my DSLR, Canon Rebel 1100D the shutter speed is automatic and you cannot set it.

    I just took a look in its Manual - right, just 'all auto' avialable..

     

    What you can do, although, 'force' the device to slow shutter speed, by using ND-filters ... but keep an eye on your display: if the cam starts to use higher gain aka 'ISO beyond 800-1000', you get too much noise...

     

    and, no, do NOT convert to 24! that's 'uneven math' and could cause stutter/hickups in your moving pictures ...

     

    @babylonslim:

    the 180° degree rule determines shutter speed in conjuncton with framerate ... so, what's wrong with my statement? digital cams have no rotary disc shutter, yepp, but the rule gives still some orientation ... (?)

  • 5. Re: Shooting video in 25 fps. Is it best to convert to 24 fps in FCP X?
    babylonslim Level 2 Level 2 (310 points)

    The 180° rule is a basic guideline in film making that states that two characters in the same scene should always have the same left/right relationship to each other. The 180° shutter rule is the rule you are talking about here.

     

    Also, rules are made to be...