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Images got rotated wrong

1886 Views 8 Replies Latest reply: Apr 21, 2009 11:13 AM by Francine Schwieder RSS
Stern2309 Calculating status...
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Apr 19, 2009 11:45 AM
I just got my first Mac and uploaded all my files which have been on my Windows operating Pc before.

Now all my images got rotated wrong in the finder and also when I open them with preview. I'm talking about all images I had rotated on my old PC with Photoimpact after I took them with my camera in portrait view. I always saved the original higher resolution photos, which have not been rotated and those appear now rotated in finder etc.? If I try to upload either one (original or smaller rotated version) to the internet (facebook) they appear the opposite (rotated as they were taken) again.

How can I make Finder and Preview from showing me the right version?

Thanks!
Macbook Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.6)
  • nerowolfe Level 6 Level 6 (13,070 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 19, 2009 12:23 PM (in response to Stern2309)
    Welcome to Apple Discussions:
    When you say "uploaded" I presume you mean transferred from PC to Mac. Exactly how did you perform this operation?
    Bear in mind that not all PC image standards are standard. I have copied images from my PCs to my Macs and the views did not change.
    MacBookPro3,1-17"Core2Duo/VistaUlt64SP1; MacBookPro1,1-15"/XPProSP3; Dual G5/XPP, Mac OS X (10.5.6), Homebrew 3GHz ASUS PC, Dell Inspiron8k, Abacus, Sliderule, HP-50G
  • Terence Devlin Level 10 Level 10 (121,745 points)
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    Apr 19, 2009 12:40 PM (in response to Stern2309)
    This is a question about the software you used to rotate the images. Did it actually rotate them? Or simply add an Exif tag to them. The Finder is not aware of Exif tags.

    Regards

    TD
    MacBook Pro 15 2.4 C2D / iMac 20" 2.66 C2D, Mac OS X (10.5), 4 gig RAM/ 4 gig RAM
  • Francine Schwieder Level 6 Level 6 (19,000 points)
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    Apr 20, 2009 9:11 AM (in response to Stern2309)
    This can be maddening under the best of conditions, ESPECIALLY if the files came from a Windows machine. There are images that have actually had their pixels rotated, and images that just have an EXIF rotation tag. Some things read that tag in OS X, and a few things don't. Safari doesn't, so if you want to know the true state of the pixels drop the image into Safari. What you see in Safari is what software which doesn't read EXIF tags will display, including uploads to a web site.

    Finder actually does read the EXIF tag, and when it draws thumbs will display the rotated view, even though the image is NOT actually rotated. Preview also reads the tag and displays the image based on the tag. Whether PhotoImpact truly rotates the pixels I don't know, I haven't used it. I have a batch of pix taken at Easter by my sis-in-law and processed on her Windows box, 32 of them are in portrait view, all display a portrait view thumb in Finder, but only 3 of them are actually rotated and display correctly in Safari, the other 29 show in landscape view in Safari.

    So if you want to get your photos "right" you should drop the photo into a Safari window to see what the actual state of the pixels truly is. If it displays in landscape rather than portrait, open it in Preview. If it displays in portrait there, it means the pixels are not rotated, but the EXIF tag is showing the rotation. If that is the case, go to File->Save as, at the bottom UNcheck the box to use the EXIF orientation tag and save. It will now show in landscape view in Preview. Rotate it and save. It will now have its pixels actually rotated display correctly anywhere.
    Francine


    Francine
    Schwieder
    2x2.66 Dual Core MacPro; iBookG4; iPod, Mac OS X (10.5.5), Cinema Display, Wacom Tablet
  • nerowolfe Level 6 Level 6 (13,070 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 20, 2009 1:00 PM (in response to Stern2309)
    Stern2309 wrote:
    I am quite sure they were actually rotated. Also even if it was just saved in the exif, that doesn't explain why Finder, Preview and iPhoto show the original NOT rotated high resolution photo rotated.

    FYI
    Here are a few exif editor/viewers for Mac as well as a detailed page about the tagging.
    http://wareseeker.com/free-exif-editor-mac/
    http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/TagNames/EXIF.html
    Not sure if it will answer your question, but it might provide some info on what's happening.
    MacBookPro3,1-17"Core2Duo/VistaUlt64SP1; MacBookPro1,1-15"/XPProSP3; Dual G5/XPP, Mac OS X (10.5.6), Homebrew 3GHz ASUS PC, Dell Inspiron8k, Abacus, Sliderule, HP-50G
  • Francine Schwieder Level 6 Level 6 (19,000 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 21, 2009 11:13 AM (in response to Stern2309)
    Reading your answers I am assuming there is no way to tell Finder not to read the Exif, right?


    None that I ever heard of. There is one thing you can do, if you want to tell from the thumbs what the true orientation is--add custom thumbs which show the "as is" state, rather than letting Finder draw the icons. There are several way to do this, but far and away the easiest is download VitaminSee:

    http://www.elliotglaysher.org/vitaminsee/

    In its preferences you can set it to automatically add a custom thumbnail to the graphics files as you browse them. It does NOT read or display things using the EXIF tag, so as you browse you will see things "as they really are" and the thumbnail, which Finder will display from then on, is added reflecting the true state of the pixels. This should simplify finding which files need to have the rotation applied. As to the simplest way to do this: well, for me it is to open the file in Photoshop and resave, or use a Photoshop droplet to batch process files. You might take a look at Graphic Converter:

    http://www.lemkesoft.com/public/content/index.\cGlkPTg4.html

    It has one nifty feature that will apply the rotation and resize images for use on the web, all in one one fell swoop. It is not free however, but it is cheaper than Photoshop (MUCH!), and even cheaper than Photoshop Elements. It is very versatile, and if you don't yet have an image editor you should try it out. You can also import the images into iPhoto, then export them for the web.
    Francine


    Francine
    Schwieder
    2x2.66 Dual Core MacPro; iBookG4; iPod, Mac OS X (10.5.5), Cinema Display, Wacom Tablet

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