5 Replies Latest reply: Mar 6, 2008 12:29 PM by buzz_kill
tlister Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Hi,

I know there are many threads already on this topic, in fact too many. I know cell phones cause interference on speakers. The I-phone's interference is worse than on anything else i have used.

I always used to just keep my cell phone away from speakers, but now i NEED to keep the two close for syncing and charging.

How do i keep the two devices in the same room without the interference?

thanks

Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.1), 16gb i-phone
  • Goshia Level 4 Level 4 (1,400 points)
    Ferrite, Go to Radio shack and buy some ferrite beads. The ferrite is an RF absorber material.
  • tlister Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    sweet!

    short term fix before i get to the store tomorrow?
  • Jason L Community Specialists Community Specialists (10,810 points)
    Hey tlister,

    This article provides tips on Avoiding radio frequency interference.
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=305662

    Jason
  • Peter Stevenson Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Tlister:

    i know this sounds crazy, but i did it and it works:

    cut a piece of aluminum foil, 2x3inches, fold it in half (= 2x1.5 inches).
    tape the fold to the back of the iPhone on the right starting at the bottom
    so that i covers the lower black plastic part and most of the words on the
    metal skin.

    i had bad interference with the car radio.
    so i taped this on the back, went to the car and had complete elimination
    of the repetitive interference.

    doc
  • buzz_kill Level 3 Level 3 (825 points)
    I'm a little confused on the point of that article: is it the iPhone's fault that it creates the static, or is Apple blaming the other devices (i.e., my computer speakers)?

    My roommate had a Nextel push-to-talk phone a few years ago that would make my computer's speakers rattle briefly when it received a call -- if the phone was within 2-3'. The iPhone pretty consistently generates interference even when it's 4-5' away from the same speakers. I've never had another cell phone that did this at all, much less with the regularity or range of the iPhone.

    Does that have something to do with the EDGE connection? The iPhone is the first one I've had that used EDGE or AT&T/Cingular's network; all my other phones have been Verizon.

    Just curious where the fault lies. According to that article, it's my speakers and not the iPhone. If that's the case, is it just certain speakers?

    Thanks.