Previous 1 2 Next 29 Replies Latest reply: Mar 17, 2008 1:35 AM by R C-R Go to original post
  • Rachel R Level 6 Level 6 (18,700 points)
    ali brown wrote:
    Perhaps if you choose to Hide your Email address, in your Public Profile, the amount od spam will eventually subside.


    I think it's unlikely that Dane's problem resulted from having his email address in his profile, since he signed up on the day he posted this topic.

    It's entirely possible he's receiving spam from a non-Apple source, but not due to his Discussions profile originally showing his email address.

    Message was edited by: Rachel R
  • fjfjfjfjfjfjdksllair Level 2 Level 2 (320 points)
    Is it possible that you are seeing the Apple Hot News RSS feed that is enabled by default in Leopard Mail?
  • Hardy Geer Level 4 Level 4 (3,165 points)
    How does one turn it (the RSS feed that is) off?
  • Hardy Geer Level 4 Level 4 (3,165 points)
    Thank you.
    Hardy
  • dane1234 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Please excuse the delay in responding; I had not seen these posts to my thread until now.

    Copies of the spam emails from Apple that have been showing up in my email in box ever since I registered my purchase of OS 10.5 are attached.

    I am not sure what a "troll" is but it doesn't sound like a compliment. But I am a legitimate email user and up to now a satisfied Apple customer.

    These spam emails sure look like legitimate Apple emails to me, but, if not, please educate me.

    Okay, here a few of the spam emails clogging up my in box:

    While it was already a great tool for reading PDFs, Preview in Leopard became even better with new features that include a new user interface, relevancy ranked searches (thanks to Spotlight), and many more. In fact, Preview now lets you annotate PDFs, offering a fast and efficient way to share comments with those you’re collaborating with. Find out how by reading our Pro Tip of the Week.
    Read more…

    “I’ve never had to wait less for any application to launch or process to complete,” says Michael DeAgonia (computerworld.com) in his review of the new Mac Pro. Calling it “an amazing machine that is as fast as it is stable, offering pure brute force and processing power at a competitive price,” DeAgonia concludes that the latest version of the Mac Pro “is beyond the sum of its parts. It’s the technological equivalent of a well-played symphony: Each individual piece is solid in its own right, but everything is amplified once they’re put together in concert.”
    Read more…

    Says David Pogue (nytimes.com). Waxing enthusiastic about the forthcoming iPhone 2.0 software, Pogue explains that following its release, “there will be thousands of iPhone programs, covering every possible interest.” And they’ll be available 24/7 since “Apple will preinstall the iPhone Apps Store right on every phone.” The move will turn iPhone into “an engineering tool, a game console, a free-calls Skype phone, a business tool, a dating service, an e-book reader, a chat room, a database, an Etch-a-Sketch,” and, Pogue predicts “a gigantic success.”
    Read more…

    “It’s clear that the platform is gaining momentum,” states Jim Goldman (cnbc.com). Goldman’s comments stem from the revelation this morning that more than “100,000 iPhone developers downloaded the beta version of the SDK in the first four days that it was available.” And to the fact that Intuit, Namco Networks, NetSuite, PopCap, Rocket Mobile, Six Apart, and THQ Wireless have joined Sega, salesforce.com, Electronic Arts, and ePocrates in expressing enthusiasm for the SDK and their interest in creating software for iPhone.
    Read more…

    After describing how he shot the recent Lunar eclipse, photographer Marty German also explains how he processed his RAW images: “I used my Aperture 2 trial software to process the three shots. Thanks to Derrick Story’s, Aperture 2: New Features tutorial on lynda.com, it took only a couple of minutes for me to adjust each shot, fine tuning exposures, boosting contrast and reducing color noise.” German adds that, in his estimation, “the raw converter in Aperture 2 is as good as NX’s and both NX and Aperture produce noticeably better Nikon raw conversions than ACR does.”
    Read more…

    Get the point? I am not hallucinating these emails.

    Although I was finally contacted yesterday by an Apple representative indicating that he would try to stop these undesired messages, today when I got home from work, guess what? More spam emails from Apple.
  • MGW Level 7 Level 7 (27,020 points)
    Could it be that you checked "send me information on Apple products"or something like that. when you registered your copy of Leopard? There is a checkbox on the registration form, that I believe, is checked by default.





    Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
  • Rachel R Level 6 Level 6 (18,700 points)
    dane1234 wrote:
    Copies of the spam emails from Apple that have been showing up in my email in box ever since I registered my purchase of OS 10.5 are attached.

    These spam emails sure look like legitimate Apple emails to me, but, if not, please educate me.

    Okay, here a few of the spam emails clogging up my in box:


    You haven't posted headers, like "to" and "from." Are there any?

    I ask because I think what you're seeing might be RSS feeds, as a couple of others have mentioned. I know you said you don't have any RSS subscriptions, but... Apple's Mail program in OS X 10.5 is able to read RSS feeds and I believe is set up initially with a subscription to Apple's "Hot News" RSS feed. (Click on that link and you'll see that all of the headlines you quoted are on that page.) Do these show up in this area of Mail.app:

    RSS in Mail.app- screenshot

    And do they look anything like this:

    RSS in Mail.app- screenshot

    (Click to see the above image in its full size.)

    Another possibility is that you or someone inadvertently clicked a setting in Mail.app for the RSS feed to "Show in Inbox." They would still look similar in your inbox to my screenshot above, but they would be in the Inbox at the top of Mail.app. If you click the disclosure triangle next to "Inbox" they would be in an RSS "inbox" within it called "Apple Hot News," like this:

    RSS in Mail.app- screenshot

    Is any of the above what you're seeing? If so, these aren't emails. They're RSS feed subscriptions that come by default with Mail.app, and they're very easy to turn off. Just let us know if that's what you're seeing and I or someone else here will explain how.

    Message was edited by: Rachel R
  • joeuu Level 5 Level 5 (5,075 points)
    Might there be a subtle difference in their email and eNews, which most of those look like?

    Try going to:

    _http://apple.com/sitemap_

    and click eNews in the upper left column. At the very bottom of the page is an Unsubscribe link.

    Joe
  • dane1234 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Rachel: Yes, what you call "RSS" feeds is exactly what I am getting, although they show up in my email in box, exactly as emails do. Armed with this information, I deleted (I hope) anything to do with RSS mail boxes in my Apple email program (V3.2).

    If this works, you have my thanks. And shame on Apple for making "RSS feeds" a default set up, and not having an "unsubscribe" or "cancel" link on each such feed; what arrogance.
  • Rachel R Level 6 Level 6 (18,700 points)
    dane1234 wrote:
    Rachel: Yes, what you call "RSS" feeds is exactly what I am getting, although they show up in my email in box, exactly as emails do.


    *The fact that your RSS feeds were showing up in your inbox means someone with access to your computer Control-clicked on the RSS feed at the bottom of Mail's left column and chose "Show in inbox" from the contextual menu.* I think that's where the real confusion lies here. And yet that's not how Apple set it up initially; someone had to have clicked that option on your computer for this to happen, otherwise it would have been much more clear to you that these were not email.

    RSS is a new feature for Mail.app, by popular demand. Apple includes their Hot News RSS feed so you can see that RSS is now available in Mail and then delete any RSS feeds you don't want and add any other sites' feeds that you do want, much like including a default set of bookmarks in Safari.

    One click removes the RSS subscription. (Control-click and choose "Delete Feed.")

    Armed with this information, I deleted (I hope) anything to do with RSS mail boxes in my Apple email program (V3.2).
    If this works, you have my thanks. And shame on Apple for making "RSS feeds" a default set up, and not having an "unsubscribe" or "cancel" link on each such feed; what arrogance.


    Yes, you can delete your RSS feeds. It's not email, it's not an email subscription, and therefore there is no need for an opt out link. You aren't opted in. No one is actively "sending" you the feeds, since it's just a link to look at what is available via RSS, much like a bookmark. Delete the link and it's gone. That "delete" option, completely under your own control, is your unsubscribe/cancel link.

    The thing that makes it different from a bookmark is that the RSS link actively pulls new information when the RSS feed is updated by its publisher. In fact, you can adjust that behavior in Mail's preferences:

    Mail > Preferences > RSS > Check for updates \[Manually / Every 30 minutes/ Every hour / Every day


    Message was edited by: Rachel R

    Message was edited by: Rachel R
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (15,905 points)
    dane1234 wrote:
    And shame on Apple for making "RSS feeds" a default set up, and not having an "unsubscribe" or "cancel" link on each such feed; what arrogance.


    1. It isn't the default.
    2. It isn't email.
    3. Every RSS feed is clearly identified in Mail.app by the letters "RSS" on a blue background in the left pane of the main window.
    4. You must check the "show in inbox" option when adding one for it to appear in the "Inbox" section of that pane; otherwise it will be shown in a separate "RSS" section.
    5. You can easily remove any RSS feed from Mail, or chose another app as your default RSS reader -- just go to (surprise!) the RSS tab of Mail's preferences.
    6. In that tab (or the similarly named one in Safari or very likely in any other RSS-capable app's preferences) you can set RSS feed items to automatically be deleted after some interval like 1 day or 1 week, whether you have looked at them or not.
    7. There are thousands & thousands of RSS feeds available on the Internet, covering a wide variety of subjects, from hundreds of sources.
    8. This is not something invented by Apple, nor is how Mail.app presents it unusual, arrogant, or shameful. See for example the similarities in Mozilla's open source Thunderbird application.
    9. It is a shame is that you have mistaken RSS feeds for email, but once you understand the difference, you may find them a very handy way to access some interesting internet content, if not from Apple then from other RSS feed publishers, & if not with Mail.app then with another one more to your liking.
  • Hardy Geer Level 4 Level 4 (3,165 points)
    There is no shame to mistake RSS for email.
  • Rachel R Level 6 Level 6 (18,700 points)
    Hardy Geer wrote:
    There is no shame to mistake RSS for email.


    Of course not.

    In the context of R C-R's sentence, +"It is a shame is that you have mistaken RSS feeds for email,"+ the meaning of "shame" isn't "disgrace or disrepute." In that context it means "a pity" or "something to be regretted." (As in the example Merriam Webster gives: "it's a shame you can't go.")

    In other words, it's unfortunate that this misunderstanding occurred.
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (15,905 points)
    Hardy Geer wrote:
    There is no shame to mistake RSS for email.


    The only real shame would be in not learning from the mistake.
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