5 Replies Latest reply: Apr 4, 2008 9:51 PM by Allan Sampson
VintageSlots Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
I recently purchased a MacBook Pro and am in the process of trying to dump my Windows PC.

All of my important contacts are on my iPhone. How can I get those contacts into my Mac Address Book?

The same question goes for the music (ripped from CD) and my video files that are on my iPhone? The media is not that big of a deal because I can easily transfer it from my PC to my Mac but I assume I am not the only one in the world trying to do this and that Apple would make it very easy for MSFT Windows users to easily migrate to Macs.

I must be an idiot but I don't see any option in iTunes to transfer the data from my iPhone into iTunes and/or the Address Book.

Thanks

MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.2)
  • Allan Sampson Level 10 Level 10 (123,370 points)
    The sync process for contact information, calendar events, and bookmarks with an iPhone is bidirectional with the supported application on your computer.

    Enter at least one contact in the Address Book application and one calendar event in iCal on your Mac before syncing. Pay attention to any message provided when syncing such as merging data. If you are unsure about any such message provided, cancel the sync until you are sure.

    iTunes includes an option to transfer content from an iPod or iPhone that was purchased from the iTunes Store only. Music and video that was acquired elsewhere must be transferred to your iTunes library on your Mac another way.

    An iPod supports what is called disk mode to enable the iPod as an external drive for transferring data. The iPhone does not support disk mode.
  • VintageSlots Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Thanks for the information on how to merge in the contact information. I was able to do it.

    It is pretty lame on Apple's part to only allow purchased music to be recovered. Why in the he** should I purchase a CD on itunes when I already own it? Making me rip it again to move it to another computer does not make sense. Fortunately, the files are on my Windows PC so I should be able to just mount that folder and bring it to my Mac.
  • Allan Sampson Level 10 Level 10 (123,370 points)
    You don't have to purchase a CD on iTunes when you already purchased a license to use the content - we don't own any of the music that we purchase - we purchase a use license only. The reason for this is not because Apple is only interested in people purchasing the content from the iTunes Store. There are several other options available to you for transferring your iTunes library from your Windows PC to your Mac. You can't use your iPhone to transfer Word and Excel files from your Windows PC to your Mac. An iPhone is not designed to be used an an external drive for transferring data between computers, or as a backup drive.

    The vast majority of music sold thru the iTunes Store includes DRM protection required by those who own the distribution rights or are the copyright holders for the content. This provides some control or makes it harder for people to steal music, along with some other reasons why Apple doesn't support disk mode with an iPhone.

    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=304721
  • VintageSlots Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Your argument makes no sense. You are comparing Apples to Oranges.

    The iPhone's primary function is NOT a word processor or a spread sheet analyzer.

    It IS an iPod, a device designed to store and play music (in addition to being a browser and a phone).

    Making it difficult to transfer my legal music from my iPhone to my Mac does not make me want to go out and buy more Apple products or Apple software.

    All of Apple's commercials imply how easy the user experience is over Windows. Well, in this case, they missed the boat BIG TIME!

    I understand that the iPhone was not designed to be used as a backup. However, you allow the contacts to be merged in but not the music that I legally installed (but didn't purchase from the iTunes store).

    Thanks for the link to the article. While not difficult to transfer my music via a network share it is a lot more work then it should be considering my music is on my iPhone and it should be a piece of cake to just transfer it from the iPhone to the Mac. However, Apple wants to make it difficult unless I purchased the music from iTunes.

    In addition, if my hard disk suffered a crash and I lost all my music it just seems stupid not to be able to pull it off my iPhone (yes, I know data should be backed up on a different drive, and mine is, but I am sure a lot of people do not back up their data).
  • Allan Sampson Level 10 Level 10 (123,370 points)
    The iPhone's primary function is NOT a word processor or a spread sheet analyzer.


    I didn't say, nor was I trying to imply ANYTHING of the sort. You should read what I provided again a little slower and in it's entirety, not taking this out of context, which you made into Apples and Oranges.

    It IS an iPod, a device designed to store and play music (in addition to being a browser and a phone).


    It is a phone, an iPod, and an internet device, which supports transferring iTunes content from iTunes on a single computer ONLY.

    Making it difficult to transfer my legal music from my iPhone to my Mac does not make me want to go out and buy more Apple products or Apple software.


    Good, then don't - no skin off my back. I couldn't care less if you want to remain a Windows sufferer. All this doesn't come from Apple. Much of it comes from those who OWN the distribution rights for content sold thru the iTunes Store.

    All of Apple's commercials imply how easy the user experience is over Windows. Well, in this case, they missed the boat BIG TIME!


    Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but let me get this straight. You will likely need to transfer much more than just music from your Windows PC to your Mac and if so, how do you plan on accomplishing this? If you are transferring Word and Excel files, photos, and any other data, you won't be using an iPhone for this, so I don't see the big deal with transferring your iTunes library along with all other data being transferred.

    I understand that the iPhone was not designed to be used as a backup. However, you allow the contacts to be merged in but not the music that I legally installed (but didn't purchase from the iTunes store).


    I don't allow anything - this is a user to user help forum only.

    As I provided in my first post in this thread - the sync process for contact information, calendar events, and bookmarks with an iPhone is bidirectional with the supported application on your computer. This is a sync process by definition of syncing - which is not the same for other data such as iTunes content and photos transferred from your computer to your iPhone.

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1296

    Apple wants to make it difficult unless I purchased the music from iTunes.


    No, Apple or really those who own the distribution rights or the copyright holders for content sold thru the iTunes Store wants to make this difficult. Content sold thru the iTunes Store is set up by Apple to be a break even - which is included with the Apple stockholder's report. Apple makes their profit via sales of the iPod and iPhone. The bulk of the iTunes Store revenue goes to those who own the distribution rights or the copyright holders for the content.

    In addition, if my hard disk suffered a crash and I lost all my music it just seems stupid not to be able to pull it off my iPhone (yes, I know data should be backed up on a different drive, and mine is, but I am sure a lot of people do not back up their data).


    Maintaining a backup of your data is important for this very reason, and for other reasons which is not Apple's responsibility. I believe iTunes includes an occasional warning message to backup your iTunes library (which can be turned off), and iTunes includes an option to transfer content purchased from the iTunes Store from an iPod or iPhone - since the overwhelming majority of this content includes DRM protection required by those who own the distribution rights or the copyright holders.

    The iPhone was not designed as an external storage device or as a backup device - end of story. If someone chooses not to maintain a backup, they are playing Russian roulette with their data. Maintaining a backup is important regardless the platform, but even more so when running Windows with constant virus, adware, and spyware concerns.