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How to find hardware configuration via serial number

3551 Views 7 Replies Latest reply: Jun 5, 2008 9:08 AM by Hot Dice RSS
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Jun 4, 2008 9:02 AM
I need to know the model number for the hard drive in my powerbook. The powerbook won't power on at the moment. Is there any way I can look up the serial number and find out what hardware was installed in it? It is a 100 GB drive and the computer was custom ordered.

Thanks!
pbg4 1.67 ghz, Mac OS X (10.4.11)
  • joeuu Level 5 Level 5 (5,075 points)
    Should find the serial number under the battery, then search here:

    _http://support.apple.com/specs/#powerbook_

    Joe
    15 pb 1.25ghz 2gb RAM 80gb; 20 iMac 2.0ghz 1.5gb; BlackBook 2gB; Touch, Mac OS X (10.5.3), Newton in the closet. SE 30 in the Garage.
  • eww Level 9 Level 9 (52,975 points)
    Hi, HD. If the PB won't run, the only way to get the information you want is to open the machine up and read the drive label. I believe even if you have the original sales invoice and build-to-order papers for the purchase of the machine, there will be no information in them about the drive model.

    Why is it important to you to know that?
    TiBook 1GHz/1G/120G; PTProG3 500MHz/768M/160G, Mac OS X (10.3.x), film and flatbed scanners, projector, graphics tablet, laser and photo printers
  • joeuu Level 5 Level 5 (5,075 points)
    Obviously you have to take the old drive out regardless, to be sure. Like RAM, Apple may have two or more name brands of the same component installed on any particular model.

    Good Luck,
    15 pb 1.25ghz 2gb RAM 80gb; 20 iMac 2.0ghz 1.5gb; BlackBook 2gB; Touch, Mac OS X (10.5.3), Newton in the closet. SE 30 in the Garage.
  • eww Level 9 Level 9 (52,975 points)
    HD: My guess is that unless you are truly expert and have a comprehensive set of specialized miniature tools at your disposal, there is almost no chance that you will succeed in what you propose to do. I suggest that before you tackle the mechanical parts inside your failed drive, you consider swapping the controller board on the outside of it. A failure of that board can render a drive just as inert as a mechanical failure inside it, without disturbing the data stored on the platters at all. A failure of the internal mechanicals, if that's what has occurred, is more likely to have irretrievably destroyed some or all of your data, so that you couldn't recover it even if you were successful in the extremely delicate task of removing the platters and placing them in a new case. If there has been no mechanical failure, replacing a failed controller board with a good one may restore all your data to accessibility without jeopardizing its integrity at all in the process. Changing the board would be a much less intrusive and far safer first step toward recovering your data than tearing down the drive's mechanicals, and it might prove to be all you need to do.
    TiBook 1GHz/1G/120G; PTProG3 500MHz/768M/160G, Mac OS X (10.3.x), film and flatbed scanners, projector, graphics tablet, laser and photo printers

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