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  • Pinger Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Ok my computer sees the Macbook but I cannot access anything on it, I put a Mac Office Work file in the Public/Drop Box folder but I cannot access anything on the Macbook and I'm not sure where on the MacBook to look for shared folders or other computers on the network. Also still absolutely no luck getting the MacBook to see the Printer which is connected to the Vista Computer that sees the Mac but cannot access anything on it. When I try to access the mac by double click/explore/open it's icon in my network I get "Windows cannot access Macbook" and under details it says "Network Path was not found". We are slowly getting this to work but seems like there is still something blocking the Mac from sharing.
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Pinger,

    What networking devices are you using? How is the network set up physically? How is the PC connected to the network, how is the Macbook?

    Scott
  • Pinger Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    My Network setup:
    Dell Vista Desktop with a HP Deskjet932CPrinter connected and which all computers in the network use.
    Netgear Wireless Router
    Westall DSL Modem
    2 Dell Vostro Laptops (Vista)
    Dell Dimension XP Pro
    New MacBook (Leopard 10.5)
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Pinger,

    How is the PC connected to the network, how is the Macbook?

    If you are connecting the Macbook and the PC using different methods (one wirelessly, one wired), you might have some AP isolation in place. This is when the wireless network is isolated from the standard ethernet network, and communication between the two can be difficult, if not impossible. This is controlled by a setting in your router's configuration.

    If this isn't an issue, there may be something wrong with the installation of OS X on the Macbook. As I mentioned before, it wouldn't be that unusual. In spite of what other posters may have stated, there should be no problems with this. I'm just about ready to recommend a format and reinstall of OS X from the "Software Restore" DVD that came with your Macbook. Now, before your daughter has much of her own "stuff" on this computer, is the time to do it as painlessly as possible.

    Scott
  • Pinger Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Scott,

    My Vista PC is connected via USB, all other computers(2 Dell Vostro(Vista), Dell Desktop(XP Pro) and the Mac are all wireless connections. One interesting thing, I renamed the Mac in the Network to a shorter easier name and my Dell PC(Vista) now sees it but cannot access anything on it, I actually was able to get to the Shared/Public folder in the Mac but when I tried to access the "Drop File" it wouldn't let me, the next time I tried I couldn't even get to the Shared/Public File. We are progressing but slowly lol.. I double checked all share settings and all are set to share. Even when I was able to get as far as the "Shared/Public" folder the printer never became visable to the Mac. As you said I rather not have to reinstall Leopard..
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Pinger,

    I actually was able to get to the Shared/Public folder in the Mac but when I tried to access the "Drop File" it wouldn't let me

    Actually, that's normal. The "Drop Box" folder is there for you to transfer files in, giving the owner of the Drop Box a copy. You are not allowed to actually see the contents. Try dropping a file in there, and see is it shows up in your daughter's account.

    What this means is that the Macbook is accepting connections. I wonder if being connected via USB has anything to do with the problems. Try getting one of the other PCs to connect to the Macbook.

    Scott
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Pinger,

    Well, there is evidently some conflict going on between 10.5.3 and the latest update to Vista. Could be one or the other, but it might be both. I have done some testing, then some research, then some more testing, and I have a few answers for you. Not having PCs in my environment as a general rule, I am not the cross-platform networking "guru" that some on these forums might be, but I think I have some relief for you, nonetheless.

    First, Vista and Leopard do not need to be in the same "workgroup" in order to see and access each other. XP still needs this, however, so you'll need to have everybody on the same page, as far as this is concerned. The Macbook should take care of this by itself, as and when it needs to.

    Vista is only going to "share" what you tell it to, explicitly. I recommend you right-click on your "home" directory in Vista and choose "share.." Leave password protection in place, but you'll need to click the "Advanced..." button to set permissions such that someone actually logged in over the network, with that home directory mounted remotely, has "full control." This will allow you to drag files/folders either way across the network. Of course, if you only want specific "shared" folders to be accessed, you can do that instead.

    You have your mixed XP and Vista machines talking nicely, so I won't address that.

    Accessing the Mac from the PC:

    Now, Vista connects to the Mac much differently than the other way around. You'll need to use full names for accounts (theoretically, you can use short names, but I found that less reliable than the full name for the account on the Mac). If you have a same-named account on both machines (Vista and Mac), and both accounts use the same password, Vista can and will connect and authenticate automatically. You see, it will first attempt to access the remote computer using the same credentials as the account from which the access is attempted. If either the names or passwords are different, you will get a name/password dialogue. There are pros and cons to using both setups...

    I think the advantage of having the Vista account access the Mac account automatically, by using the same credential for the two accounts on the two machines, is self-explanatory. Using different credentials, however, allows you to access the Mac "as you go," so to speak. The advantage to this is that you can log into the Mac using any account information you choose. If there are multiple accounts on the Mac that you might want to access, this allows you to choose which one. When logged in remotely, you will have the permissions and capabilities granted the local user (on the Mac).

    I did have some difficulty "seeing" the Mac from Vista, even with Bonjour installed. Sometimes it would appear right away when I opened the "network" window, sometimes I had to re-scan one or more times. In several instances, the Mac would appear, but immediately disappear. I'm not sure what's going on, here. Nevertheless, when I was able to get the Mac's icon to show up long enough to double-click it, access was smooth and immediate.

    Accessing the PC from the Mac:

    All of your PCs are supposed to just show up in the Finder's sidebar whenever the computers are on the same network, in the same subnet. I have seen this in action in Leopard in the past, but I found it to be not working during my testing. Again, I think something has broken with the updates to OS X, Windows, or both. Nevertheless, you can make the connection, even if the computers are not automatically "seeing" each other. In the Finder on the Mac, choose Go>Connect to Server.... You could try clicking "Browse...," but that will probably get you the same thing that you see in the Finder Sidebar; nothing. In the "Server Address:" filed at the top of the window, type the network name of your PC as follows:

    SMB://COMPUTER_NAME

    then click "Connect." Enter the full name of the account you want to access on the PC, and the password. You will be given a list of "shares" from the PC. Select one, and you should now see the PC show up in the Finder's Sidebar, as well as the contents of your chosen "share" in the body of the Finder window.

    Please let me know how you get on with this info. I am going to do some further testing to see how/if the Mac's firewall settings affect all this, and I'll let you know what I find.

    Scott
  • Pinger Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Scott, thanks for hangin in there with me
    I tried the methods you suggested but no luck. BUT we are at the state now where my PC sees the Macbook and gets as far as "SEEING" the Drop folder, I cannot open it even though there are documents in it, I am able to drop files into the drop folder from the PC and it arrives just fine to the MAc, granted so far I have only tried single Work Documents and sometimes it won't work, then I have to just keep trying until it does work. My PC has still never showed up on the MacBook nor has it been able to see our HP Printer(even with Bonjour installed). Any other things we can attemtpt? I feel we are slowly creeping up on the solution..
  • Pinger Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Seems to be a rare I can get the two computers to gel enough to even do something as simple as drop a single file into the drop box.. I hate to say it but I might be at the point where I want to try reinstalling Leopard on the new MacBook
    Is it as easy as installing Vista or XP?? Anything I need to know before I do it?? Being a new Mac I figure if I'm going to do a reinstall better to do it before it needs backing up..What do you think, do a reinstall or try something else???
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Pinger,

    I don't often say this, but I'm at my wit's end, too. I have been testing all this between my MBP, booted in Vista, and another Mac running Leopard here. My success has been limited and inconsistent.

    In other words, I'm not sure a reinstall is going to help you. It is true that now would be the best time to perform one, and I heartily recommend doing so for anyone with a new computer, since many computers (Macs or otherwise) ship from the factory with incipient disk errors. For new Mac users, doing so comes with the additional benefit of introducing them to the process, thereby immediately increasing their knowledge and understanding of OS X.

    If you do jump into this, know that it is way easier than doing the same in Windows. Anecdotally, when I installed Windows for the first time on my MBP this past December, I was struck by how barbaric, complicated, and slow it was, even with Vista. You will have several options when formatting (erasing) and reinstalling, but this is the route I recommend you take:

    1) Boot to the "Software Restore" DVD that came with the Macbook. Insert the disk with the computer running, then restart. When you hear the startup chime, immediately hold down the "C" key, and continue holding it down until you see the Apple logo.

    2) Once the installer loads, you must choose a language. Do so, then look in the Menu Bar (at the top of the display) for the "Utilities" menu. Open Disk Utility from this menu. This is the same Disk Utility that you (or your daughter) will eventually use in OS X. In the "source list" on the left, you will see "devices" (physical hard drives, optical drives, etc.), with "volumes" indented beneath the device that stores them. Certain tasks can only be performed on a device, others on only volumes, while some tasks are common to both. I mention this, because I want you to select the entire internal hard drive (the "device"), not the named volume that will appear indented underneath.

    3) With your hard drive selected, switch to the "Erase" pane in the body of the window. Find and click on the "Security Options..." button. This will open a drop-down "dialogue sheet." Enable the option to "Zero All Data." This tells Disk Utility to write zeroes to the entire surface of the drive, instead of performing a simple erasure. This adds a considerable amount of time to the process (an hour or more), but it brings the added benefit of scanning for and "mapping out" any bad blocks that may exist on the drive. Your chances of having a bad block are not terribly high at this time, but the risk does exist, and this is good insurance for the immediate future. Click "OK" to dismiss the dialogue sheet.

    4) You can give any name you like to the volume that will be created during the format, but it will probably be easiest to keep the same default name (Macintosh HD). This can be changed at any later time. Enter the new name in the appropriate field, then click "Erase." Wait for the process to complete.

    5) When the drive has been formatted, quit Disk Utility to return to the installer. Proceed through the installer, following the clear instructions it will provide, until you reach the final screen that includes a "Customize..." button. Here, you can jettison some of the normally unwanted "fluff" that is installed by default with OS X. The interface is self-explanatory; simply check those items you want to keep, and uncheck those that you will not need. I recommend you opt out of any "Additional language translations" that you think you will not need (most users will not need to use their computer in Korean, for example). This will save oodles of disk space. Similarly, you can choose not to install drivers for printers you know you will not use (be careful here, as one never knows...). Any "test drive" packages are usually unwanted, too. If in doubt on any item, it is best to install it.

    6) When you have made all your choices, proceed with the installation. Follow the on-screen prompt to insert the second disk when it appears. At the end of the installation, you will enter the "Setup Assistant, just as you did when you first started the Macbook.

    7) Instead of using "Software Update," download the 10.5.3 "Combo" update. This will bring you right back up to speed with a single, large download, instead of several "delta' downloads. Once you have run the "Combo" and restarted, you can use Software Update to tie up any loose ends.

    As I have already mentioned, I'm not sure that this is going to provide any relief as far as Mac-PC networking is concerned. However, it just might, and it is one thing that I usually recommend as a matter of course for any new computer anyway. If this does solve some problems, please let us know. Since I and others are having the same problems with cross-platform sharing, any success you have with starting from scratch and using the "Combo" updater (which is known to be sometimes less error-prone) could help many others.

    Scott
  • Pinger Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Scott,
    I did a reinstall exactly as you instructed, didn't make a difference BUT didn't install the Combo Update, thought I'd try it fresh from the install, downloading and installing the combo update now hoping maybe there is something in the update that will help. I'll let you know when all is complete but not feeling very optimistic.
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Pinger,

    As I've already mentioned, I have seen my network access working as expected in the recent past. I hope this question reaches you before you install the update: What version of 10.5, exactly, are you running as installed from your Software Restore disks?

    My Macbook Pro is a few months older than your new Macbook, and it probably came with an older version of Leopard. If there is a difference, this may help us pinpoint where networking went wrong.

    Scott
  • Pinger Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Ok, there was some progress this time around. After installing all updates on the fresh reinstall of Leopard I have the MacBook to the point where the Vista PC sees it and I can transfer files back and forth using the Dell Vista as the base, unfortunately the MacBook does not see any of the 4 PCs on the Network AND still cannot get the MacBook to see the Network printer. Baby steps but it's progress..
  • john Swenby Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    This is _**TOTALLY OUT OF CONTROL**_ Why isn't Apple listening to this problem?????

    Nothing has been said at WWDC about how MacBook AIRPORT Wireless NOT WORKING

    We need to get APPLES attention: WE NEED FLOOD THE CUSTOMER SUPPORT FEEDBACK SYSTEM: http://www.apple.com/feedback/macbook.html.

    Let's let then know that we are tired of being ignored and demand that they fix the problem!!!!!

    I have used Mac since 1985 and never once have I had a problem that was not resolved immediately.

    Let's fix the MAC so we can enjoy the IPHONE.

    Frustrated!!!!!!!!!
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Pinger,

    Until we can get this cleared up for good, use this method to connect access any of the PCs from the Macbook:

    Click on the Desktop to make Finder active. From the "Go" menu, choose "Connect to Server..." Type the name of the PC to which you wish to connect:

    SMB://computer_name

    then click "Connect." For me, this has been completely reliable, provided I have file sharing turned on on the PC (Vista, in my case). You should get a username/password dialogue; enter the full name of the account which you would like to access, and the password associated with that account. That account's home directory will be mounted on the Mac's Desktop, and it will show up in the Finder sidebar as a "Shared" volume.

    Understand that this is a Windows to Mac (and vice versa) problem, not a general Mac networking problem. It is not inconceivable that Microsoft has broken this functionality in one or more of their recent updates to both Vista and XP. To give an example of how it should work, I just performed a test with 2 Macs on our network here, turning "FIle Sharing" on and off. When I turn my Macbook Pro's FIle Sharing on, it immediately shows up in both the "Network" folder and the Finder sidebar of the computer sitting across the room (well, there's a delay of about 1 second). Turn it off, and it disappears form the other computer. It works the same going the other way.

    And no, I'm not just trying to foist this problem off on something other than OS X. MS has a long history of intentionally "breaking" other developers' implementations of Windows technology, and specifically Apple's. They did it repeatedly with Quicktime for Windows some years ago, and it wouldn't surprise me to learn that they are attempting it now with sharing protocols.

    I think you will find that, once connected, your PCs and your Mac will share files just fine, but that being able to "see" one from the other will be inconsistent. Use the fool-proof method that I have given, and just hang tight for now. Apple will come along with a fix, just like always.

    Scott