Previous 1 2 Next 17 Replies Latest reply: Nov 2, 2008 4:44 AM by JustCallMe Dude
JustCallMe Dude Level 2 Level 2 (240 points)
Hello all

First of all , I'll not make the claim to be a " Know it all " when it comes down to computer temperatures, Thus the reason for my posting. I have noticed that my IMac always seems to run a bit on the hot side, so I tried googling normal temps and, what one should do. Seems no matter where and or what I read, I get mixed, incorrect and or conflicting information.

Last night I noticed my temp running a bit high so , I installed and used smcFanControl 2.1 , Now it did what it said and dropped my temp. But, when I did more homework I'm reading this app will cause unneeded wear on my fans,

So know to me it all seems very debatable and, I'm hoping to find the truth of the matter.

Here is my temps from what I first jumped on my Imac
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And here are my temps after about an hour
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Now if I'm running a demanding app such as Final Cut Express it will get warmer yet.

So I suppose my question is ,

Is there a set of ideal temperatures ?
If so, what are they ?
Would it be best to only run samFanControl, when running demanding apps ?

Thank you all in advance as I make my way through this lack of understanding and , Now confusing issue. If I even have an issue...

24" Imac 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 3GB RAM, Mac OS X (10.5.4)
  • Kenichi Watanabe Level 7 Level 7 (30,460 points)
    Just installing smcFanControl won't make any changes to the fan settings. The default setting just uses Apple's settings.

    I have it installed because I like seeing the temp in the menu bar. I have never altered the settings. I think it is best to stick with Apple's settings. They did the hardware design and determined when the fan speed should change.
  • JustCallMe Dude Level 2 Level 2 (240 points)
    I have always used IStat , IStat Menu will display fan speed, Ram. Temp ....
    I'm really thinking of uninstalling the smcFanControl, The more I read about the subject the more I feel I'm better off with out it
  • George Peters Level 4 Level 4 (3,165 points)
    When you ask this kind of question all you will get are opinions because Apple has not officially posted any kind of "normal" internal temperature ranges. All we have to go by are what people post. From my experience your temps are not that bad as I have seen a lot worse. However I am still an advocate of using SMCFC to keep temperatures lower. The goal when using the fan controller is to only increase the fans as much as you need to keep the temps where you want them to be. This can usually be done by increasing the fans only a couple hundred rmp. The way I see it the fans are there to keep your iMac cool and if they wear out faster because of it then so be it. I would much rather have to replace my fans when they burn out then to have a power supply or hard drive failure.

    If you want my opinion on temperatures I would say keep the hard drive under 50C, Power Supply under 60C, and GPU components under 55C. For your iMac, judging by the temps you posted, a fan setting of ODD: 1000, HDD: 1500, and CPU: 1500 should be more than enough. Have a look at this topic for reference: http://discussions.apple.com/message.jspa?messageID=8346538#8346538

    George
  • JustCallMe Dude Level 2 Level 2 (240 points)
    Thank you for the reply ...
    I took a look at the link and, it sent my thinking into another direction, in short the light is turning on.
    One would think, that Apple would provide such information. It's known that maintaining acceptable temperatures is vital for the life of the machine. However without providing such information, it could leave one with a false sense of security thinking " All is good " , when indeed when these numbers are over looked. There could be a problem on the rise and, one would be clueless.

    I suppose in many ways those temperature parameters I'm looking for , well is look seeking the holly grail. There are so many variables that one must factor into the mix. That being said the fan speed settings and, machine temperatures would indeed be user specific. It would still be very helpful if Apple provided some numbers, However that is not the case so, this leaves me with only one option and, I'll have to dive into my IMac and research the individual components.

    The first on my list is my CPU.

    Processor Name: Intel Core 2 Duo
    Processor Speed: 2.4 GHz

    I went into the Intel website and fond this
    http://download.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/318732.pdf

    It gives the numbers I need but, How can I tell just what series my processor is ?

    Thanks again
  • pogster Level 4 Level 4 (2,225 points)
    If you don't trust Apple's fan control then install the smc override and crank up the fans.
  • musashi88 Level 2 Level 2 (455 points)
    Hi Dude
    I use SMC. When your Power Supply Position 1 reaches 85ºC when playing a game and your mac fans do not ramp up, I kind of like to take control. The factory settings are not keeping my mac cool. I like to keep my temps close to George's. I like Temperature Monitor. It warns you when it gets hot.
    Kenichi, if your imac stays cool, (under 60ºC-70ºC) using the factory settings fans normally, great! Mine doesn't.
  • den.thed Level 7 Level 7 (24,725 points)
    Hey Dude

    I also think your safe using smc in moderation, common sense say's that running the fans real fast is bad plus it causes them to suck up more dust.

    The GPU Diode in my Jan 2006 17" Early Core Duo normally runs way up into the 165-175F range. For over 2 years I've used the smcFanControl to run the CPU and HD fans a few hundred rpms faster than Apples default speeds and my GPU Diode temp. now holds around the 145- 155F range.

    Dennis
  • George Peters Level 4 Level 4 (3,165 points)
    Open up a Terminal window and type this: /usr/sbin/ioreg -lw0 | grep CPUBrand

    George
  • elmac Level 5 Level 5 (4,230 points)
    Hi, wear is relative:- heat = wear/faster speeds to cool = wear
    My intel has run without problems "out of the Box' from day one.
    2 days ago my fans boosted to High" - No Reason as far as I'm concerned.
    After doing the SMC reset & all was good. I then d/loaded iStat & SMC FanControl,
    I will watch things for awhile..I'm NOT changing any speeds etc..just monitoring etc..L
  • JustCallMe Dude Level 2 Level 2 (240 points)
    Thank you all for the replies

    pogster wrote:
    If you don't trust Apple's fan control then install the smc override and crank up the fans.


    It's not a matter of trust, It's more to the tune of " When should one be concerned " One needs to know when and if the machine is indeed over-heating, rather then just trusting with blind faith.


    den.thed wrote:
    Hey Dude

    I also think your safe using smc in moderation, common sense say's that running the fans real fast is bad plus it causes them to suck up more dust.
    Dennis


    Moderation being the key word, This is the part where one clearly must do his or her homework on their machine. Know what it is and it's components and, just what temps it will handle.
    WHen you know this then you'll know if and, when you'll need to crank up the fans.

    George Peters wrote:
    Open up a Terminal window and type this: /usr/sbin/ioreg -lw0 | grep CPUBrand

    George


    Awesome , thank you very much
    elmac wrote:
    Hi, wear is relative:- heat = wear/faster speeds to cool = wear
    My intel has run without problems "out of the Box' from day one.
    2 days ago my fans boosted to High" - No Reason as far as I'm concerned.
    After doing the SMC reset & all was good. I then d/loaded iStat & SMC FanControl,
    I will watch things for awhile..I'm NOT changing any speeds etc..just monitoring etc..L



    Very good point , I suppose the truth of the matter is , just what side of the spectrum you wish to be on. Your plan of action is the same as mine. I see no need to crank up the fans unless I see an actual issue with my temperatures. Doing so would only cause unjustifiable and unneeded wear on the fans.
    Cranking the fans up just for the general purpose of running it cooler would be pointless if, your machine and it's inner components can handle those temps.

    In many ways this thread is reminding me of when I was in the coral reef tank hobby ( salt water aquarium ). Many newbies would drive themselves crazy trying to strive for those perfect parameters. Always adding this and doing that in an endless attempt for perfection in their water chemistry. Not knowing all they are doing is creating more issues. The point is and, my goal is, is to get within acceptable ranges and simply maintain.

    Thanks again
  • George Peters Level 4 Level 4 (3,165 points)
    JustCallMe Dude wrote:
    Cranking the fans up just for the general purpose of running it cooler would be > pointless if, your machine and it's inner components can handle those
    temps.


    Not necessarily. I think one thing missing here is that all the internal components are perfectly capable and rated to handle the temperatures we are seeing. However the thing is for instance can we expect the hard drive to last it's full MBTU by running just under it's maximum rated temperature? The answer is no. Also the fans are not necessarily rated to outlast the life span of the hardware anyway. Average hard drives are usually rated to run about 500,000 hours or more and a regular CPU fan is only rated to run about 50,000 hours. IMHO 300RPMs for 10C lower temps overall is quite worth it.

    The way Apple approaches this subject is if it's not broke then don't fix it. But if your machine fails while under warranty then they will fix it. They choose to not have their customers worrying about technical things like internal temperatures and I can see why.

    George
  • JustCallMe Dude Level 2 Level 2 (240 points)
    George Peters wrote:
    Not necessarily. I think one thing missing here is that all the internal components are perfectly capable and rated to handle the temperatures we are seeing. However the thing is for instance can we expect the hard drive to last it's full MBTU by running just under it's maximum rated temperature? The answer is no. Also the fans are not necessarily rated to outlast the life span of the hardware anyway. Average hard drives are usually rated to run about 500,000 hours or more and a regular CPU fan is only rated to run about 50,000 hours. IMHO 300RPMs for 10C lower temps overall is quite worth it.


    In short a small sacrifice ...



    The way Apple approaches this subject is if it's not broke then don't fix it. But if your machine fails while under warranty then they will fix it. They choose to not have their customers worrying about technical things like internal temperatures and I can see why.



    I can understand Apples stand point on this, If Apple installed something like samFanControl on their
    computers, Then I'm rather sure the average user would, without knowing better due to ignorance, would be burning out fans left and right. I'm sure Apple has set their fan speed based off of averages.
    Average user and average apps. However as for myself I run Final Cut Express a lot , along with other video apps. As I'm sure you may know this are not your average apps and are more demanding. The end result is running higher temps that would require a higher fan RPM.
  • elmac Level 5 Level 5 (4,230 points)
    Hi, well, luckily you now have the ability to speed up your fans..Apple, You, David & a host of other users will always use Mac's, good bad or indifferent, as we all feel at times about them.
    They are a great computing experience..shortcomings notwithstanding...L.
  • JustCallMe Dude Level 2 Level 2 (240 points)
    Very well said, one thing I have learned from the start of this thread and, that would be it's very debatable....

    For now I'll stick to my plan, research, monitor and , only make changes I deem necessary.
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