Previous 1 2 Next 25 Replies Latest reply: Nov 24, 2008 6:37 AM by benmilway
Richard Lane Level 2 Level 2 (425 points)
Did Apple remove the system font "New YorK"? I opened up an older document in Pages and received a warning that I had a missing font - New York. Sure enough...I looked around and it was no longer on my computer. I changed the font to Times but was just curious about where New York went.

Mac Pro quad, 15" Powerbook 1.67GHz, PPCG4 Dual ghz, Mac OS X (10.5.5), 4 gb RAM desktop, 1gb RAM laptop
  • Magnus Lewan Level 4 Level 4 (3,655 points)
    It disappeared with MacOS 9 and Classic - a long time ago for some of us.
  • PeterBreis0807 Level 7 Level 7 (33,655 points)
    New York disappeared long ago with Mac OS Classic.

    All the original fonts that had city names such as Monaco, Cairo and New York etc were bitmap fonts, that is they were just dots on the screen, they didn't have outlines. Although I can't quite remember whether Apple belatedly made TrueType versions of these.

    You shouldn't miss them just use something similar.
  • Richard Lane Level 2 Level 2 (425 points)
    Thanks so much. LOL....apparently I have not missed New York since I'm a long time Mac user too. I appreciate the info.
  • Henrik Holmegaard Level 3 Level 3 (575 points)
    Although I can't quite remember whether Apple belatedly made TrueType versions of these.


    These were turned into TrueType 1 by Prof Charles Bigelow and Kris Holmes. The CMAPs, if memory serves, were Apple Standard Roman.

    All the original fonts that had city names such as Monaco, Cairo and New York etc were bitmap fonts


    Not to cause confusion, hopefully, but bitmaps and bitmaps only are permissible in TrueType. A basic TrueType font file for Mac OS 9 and lower has both bitmaps and outlines. A TrueType font file can have bitmaps and bitmaps only, however, such as for the Newton operating system including its TrueType fonts for non-Latin. The point is not whether the type technology is simple bitmap or smart outline, but whether the shaping for character-glyph mapping is simple or smart. The OpenType extension to TrueType also address bitmaps, as far as I know.

    /hh
  • Magnus Lewan Level 4 Level 4 (3,655 points)
    PeterBreis0807 wrote:
    All the original fonts that had city names such as Monaco, Cairo and New York etc were bitmap fonts, that is they were just dots on the screen, they didn't have outlines. Although I can't quite remember whether Apple belatedly made TrueType versions of these.


    Monaco first appeared as a bitmap font - that fits my memory. However, I'm pretty sure New York was an outline font from day one of its history. It was not delivered with the first Macs but came later.
  • PeterBreis0807 Level 7 Level 7 (33,655 points)
    No it was a bitmap font, that was later recreated as a TrueType font by the Bigelow and Holmes studio.

    Ah memories!

    I don't think New York has ever been something I missed from the Classic OS.
  • Henrik Holmegaard Level 3 Level 3 (575 points)
    it was a bitmap font, that was later recreated as a TrueType font by the Bigelow and Holmes studio.


    Correct, below Susan Karr. By the bye, Susan Karr also developed the information graphics for the tagged transformation tables of the TrueType and ColorSync file formats.

    "Landing in the Macintosh group as a bitmap graphic designer was a lucky break for me, and one interesting part of the job was designing screen fonts. It was especially enjoyable because the Macintosh was able to display proportional typefaces, leaving behind the tyranny of monospace alphabets with their narrow m's and wide i's.

    "The first Macintosh font was designed to be a bold system font with no jagged diagonals, and was originally called "Elefont". There were going to be lots of fonts, so we were looking for a set of attractive, related names. Andy Hertzfeld and I had met in high school in suburban Philadelphia, so we started naming the other fonts after stops on the Paoli Local commuter train: Overbrook, Merion, Ardmore, and Rosemont. (Ransom was the only one that broke that convention; it was a font of mismatched letters intended to evoke messages from kidnapers made from cut-out letters ).

    "One day Steve Jobs stopped by the software group, as he often did at the end of the day. He frowned as he looked at the font names on a menu. "What are those names?", he asked, and we explained about the Paoli Local.

    " 'Well,' he said, 'cities are OK, but not little cities that nobody's ever heard of. They ought to be WORLD CLASS cities!'

    "So that is how Chicago (Elefont), New York, Geneva, London, San Francisco (Ransom), Toronto, and Venice (Bill Atkinson's script font) got their names."

    /hh

    Reference:

    http://www.folklore.org/StoryView.py?project=Macintosh&story=WorldClassCities.txt&sortOrder=Sort%20by%20Date&detail=medium&search=susan
  • Magnus Lewan Level 4 Level 4 (3,655 points)
    I found some more internet links that confirms that I was wrong. There was a bitmap version before the outline version was developed.

    Well... I'm perhaps getting old and losing my memory. Funny, I have not felt old for several decades.
  • PeterBreis0807 Level 7 Level 7 (33,655 points)
    Magnus Lewan wrote:
    Funny, I have not felt old for several decades.


    Tee Hee. Know the feeling.
  • Level 8 Level 8 (41,790 points)
    PeterBreis0807 wrote:
    New York disappeared long ago with Mac OS Classic.

    All the original fonts that had city names such as Monaco, Cairo and New York etc were bitmap fonts, that is they were just dots on the screen, they didn't have outlines.


    Do you know Lester Young's versions of "These foolish things" ?

    Monaco.dfont is available in Mac OS X delivered fonts.

    It's really happy because Apple states:
    Terminal relies on the Monaco font to function correctly.


    NewYork.ttf as well as Chicago.ttf is available in openOffice's fonts.

    You may duplicate it in a "standard" fonts folder and it will be available for every program.

    This is how I added about 15 fonts to my system's set.

    Yvan KOENIG (from FRANCE samedi 8 novembre 2008 18:46:27)
  • GEN79 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Where in OpenOffice can I find those fonts? I looked into the package of version 3, and didn't find them.
  • Level 8 Level 8 (41,790 points)
    GEN79 wrote:
    Where in OpenOffice can I find those fonts? I looked into the package of version 3, and didn't find them.


    Normal, version 3 uses the standard fonts folders.

    The fonts are available in version 2 or 2.2.

    Yvan KOENIG (from FRANCE samedi 8 novembre 2008 20:50:17)
  • Henrik Holmegaard Level 3 Level 3 (575 points)
    It's really happy because Apple states:


    It's not the TrueType outlines in Monaco that matter, but the layout logic in the font file itself.
  • Level 8 Level 8 (41,790 points)
    It's not the TrueType outlines in Monaco that matter, but the layout logic in the font file itself.


    Sure, but it's a monaco.dfont which is delivered by Apple with Mac OS X.
    So even if peter wrote that it's only a bitmap font, Apple which knows what it does , deliver a monaco font matching the system requirements.
    As far as I know, and given the results which I get when I uses it in size 500, the monaco.dfont is not a bitmap one.

    Yvan KOENIG (from FRANCE samedi 8 novembre 2008 23:25:02)
Previous 1 2 Next