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iopossum Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
I recently purchased a larger hard drive for my PowerMac G5. I'd like to clone my smaller hard drive to it and then dump it (since I also have another hard drive I will be placing in the machine, so basically replacing 1 small hard drive with 2 large hard drives). What I've done is place one of the hard drives in the machine, booted from the DVD, ran disk utility and "restored" my smaller hard drive into my larger hard drive. I'm having to issues with this:

1. This seems to partition the larger hard drive with a partition equal to the size of the smaller hard drive.
2. Disk Utility/Leopard becomes very confused once the process is over and can't figure out which hard drive is which

Any way to just basically copy the contents of one hard drive to another? I'd simply boot into Leopard normally and copy the files manually myself, but for some reason copying the files takes ages > 20 hours, while restoring takes about an hour.

Thanks!

Powermac G5 Dual 2.7, Mac OS X (10.5.1)
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    iopossum,

    The new hard drive to which you "cloned" may be using the incorrect "partition map" format. I recommend you start over, but this time use Disk Utility to first re-partition the drive so that the proper partition map is written to the drive.

    Select the new drive in Disk Utility, then switch to the "Partition" tab. Make sure it is the drive, not a named volume, that is selected (volumes appear indented beneath their respective "devices;" in this case, a drive). Use the "Partition Scheme" pull-down to select just a single volume, then click the "Options..." button. For your G5 machine, you'll need to use the "Apple Partition Scheme" format. Dismiss the dialogue sheet, then click "Apply." I recommend you allow Disk Utility to use the default "untitled" name for the resultant single volume.

    Now you are ready to "clone." Switch to the "Restore" pane. From the list on the left, drag your G5's current startup volume into the "Source" field (for all of this, you'll use the volumes, not a device or drive). Next, drag the "untitled" volume on the new drive into the "Destination" field. Make sure you have all of the proper options selected in order to first erase the destination, then to restore the source volume to it (it has been a good while since I have done this, so please bear with the vagueness of this). Click "Restore."

    It is to be expected that your machine will be confused about which drive to use, once you have successfully "cloned" one volume to another. Since Disk Utility performs a direct, byte-for-byte copy of one volume to another, it is impossible to distinguish between the two. Your best option will be to either remove the old drive or to erase it (or both), since a successful clone will render it superfluous.

    Scott
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (247,435 points)
    Let's start doing things in the proper order. You must first prep the new drive as follows:

    Extended Hard Drive Preparation

    1. Open Disk Utility in your Utilities folder. If you need to reformat your startup volume, then you must boot from your OS X Installer Disc. After the installer loads select your language and click on the Continue button. When the menu bar appears select Disk Utility from the Installer menu (Utilities menu for Tiger or Leopard.)

    2. After DU loads select your hard drive (this is the entry with the mfgr.'s ID and size) from the left side list. Note the SMART status of the drive in DU's status area. If it does not say "Verified" then the drive is failing or has failed and will need replacing. SMART info will not be reported on external drives. Otherwise, click on the Partition tab in the DU main window.

    3. Set the number of partitions from the dropdown menu (use 1 partition unless you wish to make more.) Set the format type to Mac OS Extended (Journaled.) Click on the Options button, set the partition scheme to GUID (only required for Intel Macs) then click on the OK button. Click on the Partition button and wait until the volume(s) mount on the Desktop.

    4. Select the volume you just created (this is the sub-entry under the drive entry) from the left side list. Click on the Erase tab in the DU main window.

    5. Set the format type to Mac OS Extended (Journaled.) Click on the Options button, check the button for Zero Data and click on OK to return to the Erase window.

    6. Click on the Erase button. The format process can take up to several hours depending upon the drive size.

    Upon completion quit DU and return to the installer.

    Now, as far as I know booting from the OS X Installer disc and trying to use Restore to clone one device to another may not work. It's a bug, and I don't think it's yet been fixed. You can give it a try:

    How to Clone Using Restore Option of Disk Utility

    1. Open Disk Utility from the installer's Utilities menu.
    2. Select the destination volume from the left side list.
    3. Click on the Erase tab in the DU main window. Set the format type to Mac OS Extended (journaled, if available) and click on the Erase button. This step can be skipped if the destination has already been freshly erased.
    4. Click on the Restore tab in the DU main window.
    5. Select the destination volume from the left side list and drag it to the Destination entry field.
    6. Select the source volume from the left side list and drag it to the Source entry field.
    7. Double-check you got it right, then click on the Restore button.

    Destination means the drive to which you will restore or backup.
    Source means the drive you are restoring from or backing up.


    No I'm not sure what you are cloning from the old drive to the new one. But if you can boot from the old drive, then I would do that rather than trying to boot from the OS X Installer Disc in order to clone one to the other (if it even works.) You can still use Disk Utility to clone volumes. Or you can use Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper! either of which is much faster than Disk Utility.

    You still need to do the prep on your new drive using Disk Utility, but if you can boot from the old drive then you can do that using DU from the old drive.
  • KJK555 Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)
    Holy smoke Kappy,
    Remind me not ride with you on a long trip.

    All the OP has to do is put in his new drive, Partition it to suit his taste, install
    Carbon Copy Cloner on his old drive, Clone his old drive to the new one on the fly,
    remove the old drive and boot from the up the brand new one and never look back.

    Kj
    No offense Kapppy, I got a kick out of that one, you almost had me rolling on the floor.
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (247,435 points)
    And exactly what did I fail to cover? Did I not mention Carbon Copy Cloner? I'm not even sure the old drive is bootable, but obviously you seem to know it is. I don't yet have such mental abilities.

    You needn't ride with me on any trip.

    I've learned from my time on these forums that posting your personal opinions about what someone else has posted is not the best way to make friends. Best to post your help for the OP or don't post at all. I have my way of helping, and you have yours. If I make a grievous error let me know about it.
  • KJK555 Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)
    Sorry Kappy:

    The only thing wrong was the OP was making a block level clone and confusing Leo with it as
    both disks were sporting the same signature.

    The cure was of course to partition the new drive, name the leo volume something different than the
    old one, use CCC to create a "incremental backup of selected items" clone to the new drive and
    get on with computing.

    I guess the part that tickled me was zeroing out a the new drive. That would take all the fun out of
    installing a new drive (unless I could somehow get away with charging by the hour).

    I know you are meticulous and very exacting and you surely must have more patience than the bulk
    of us and I am sure in many situations that is a good thing.

    Kj
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (247,435 points)
    Well, maybe short trips.

    On new drives I prefer to suggest zeroing the drive because it has probably not been formatted or if it has the format is usually FAT32 or NTFS. When prepping a drive for the first time zeroing the data assures you have a "clean" format. It may be extreme, I agree, but it's better to be safe than sorry. It's also a good idea to do it if you get a used drive or a drive from eBay where you don't know what might be on the device.

    As you can see I'm a firm believer in the seven P's.
  • baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (61,900 points)
    Concur with that. We, the CCC forum moderators, also recommend zeroing out the data on new drives. Just our 2¢ or pence.
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (247,435 points)
    Well, at least there are two of us!!
  • baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (61,900 points)
    Nah, there's at least three, since Andreas also recommends that!
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (247,435 points)
    Our numbers are growing by leaps and bounds. Soon everyone will be zeroing their drives whether it's needed or not. It will become a worldwide phenomenon. We'll appear on the Leno Show (I get to sit nearest to Jay.)
  • baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (61,900 points)
    ROTFLMAO!!
  • AK_Mike Level 4 Level 4 (1,225 points)
    Kappy wrote:
    Well, maybe short trips.

    On new drives I prefer to suggest zeroing the drive because it has probably not been formatted or if it has the format is usually FAT32 or NTFS. When prepping a drive for the first time zeroing the data *assures you have a "clean" format*. It may be extreme, I agree, but it's better to be safe than sorry. It's also a good idea to do it if you get a used drive or a drive from eBay where you don't know what might be on the device.

    As you can see I'm a firm believer in the seven P's.


    Is that a "clean" format or is it "erase and install" format?
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (247,435 points)
    It used to be but since discussing this at great length with two others I've concluded that I shall rename this the Zerase and Whatever or simply Zerase. We need a catchy name for it so it will be more widely picked up worldwide. Hopefully, I'll be invited on the Leno Show because of the popularity of this new concept that's sweeping through cyberspace. I'd talk with you more about it but I'm expecting a phone call from Capt. Kirk.
  • KJK555 Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)
    Hi Kappy:

    Of course you know, the days of true low level formattng are long gone. I've done my share of
    low level formatting prior to the S.M.A.R.T. controller introduction. If I zero out a drive though,
    I like to use the manufacturer's software to do it. This will of course require windows or Dos.
    I keep an old PC lying around just for that sort of thing.

    Kj
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