5 Replies Latest reply: Jan 25, 2009 4:04 PM by christopher rigby1
legolas-woodelf Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
OK, I know I'm a dinosaur, but my iTunes 7.0.2 no longer appears to be allowing me to download songs. I've looked at downloading 7.7, but the read-me says I'll need Quicktime 7.4.5. Unfortunately I need to keep my old version Quicktime 6.5.2 in order to keep my old version of iMovie working.

My question is this: will the iTunes upgrade allow me to download songs if I keep my old Quicktime version?

I don't download masses of music and certainly not enough to justify forking out for a new OS or a load of associated iLife upgrades. If I am now barred from purchasing music I'll just have to live with it, but it seems a shame if Apple are preventing me from spending what little cash I do have on music with them.

17" iMac, Mac OS X (10.3.x), 10.3.9, Quicktime 6.5.2
  • Andrew T. Level 4 Level 4 (3,210 points)
    Hello, Welcome to Discussions.




    It may be possible just to download iTunes and install it on the Mac. But typically this contains a Quicktime update in the bundle. And even if it did not contain this Quicktime Update, You may find when you go to launch iTunes that it may require a later version of Quicktime to work.


    I wish I had more of a solid answer for you. But this might be something you have to put your foot into the water and try out. Below is the link on how to fully uninstall iTunes if needed but also a list of archived versions of our software for you to go back and try.



    How to Uninstall QuickTime on a Macintosh
    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2469

    Removing iTunes for Mac OS X
    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1224

    Search for Quicktime
    http://support.apple.com/downloads/
  • ed2345 Level 7 Level 7 (21,675 points)
    +"I am now barred from purchasing music..."+

    Your description sounds like the only problem is accessing the iTunes Store. There are plenty of other places to buy high-quality, non-DRM music downloads, such as amazon.com. Check 'em out. You are hardly "barred from purchasing."
  • legolas-woodelf Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Many thanks for the responses chaps and for the weblinks.

    I'm always a bit anxious about upgrades like this as my experience shows that every time you do it you fix one bug and introduce six more which then starts you on a costly spiral of software purchases in order to get you back where you started. I realise this is a policy thing from the software industry, but for folk like me for whom cash is tight it's frustrating. I'm happy to live without new features - I just don't want to lose old ones.

    And Ed, I take your point about there being other music suppliers on the web - though I'm not sure what the quality differences are between MP3 and Apple's AAC formats. When I've used the iTunes store in the past I've always been very impressed by the elegance of the whole process and it just seems a shame that Apple are driving occasional customers like myself away by building redundancy into their software versions so rapidly.

    It looks like Apple's loss will be Amazon's gain.
  • ed2345 Level 7 Level 7 (21,675 points)
    +"I'm not sure what the quality differences are between MP3 and Apple's AAC formats"+

    The notion that AAC has superior audio quality is a holdover from the days when 128 kb/s encoding common. At 256 (which is the rate used nowadays by iTunes Plus, Amazon MP3 Download Store, and most others) the two formats are quite equivalent in audio quality. And given that MP3 is supported by a far greater range of players and programs, it is probably a better choice for most people.

    +"When I've used the iTunes store in the past I've always been very impressed by the elegance of the whole process"+

    Well that is not what I gleaned from your first post in this thread! At most online stores, you shop within your browser, so all those application-dependent problems do not occur. Anyway, I am sure you will be a wise shopper. Enjoy the music!
  • christopher rigby1 Level 4 Level 4 (2,100 points)
    And Ed, I take your point about there being other music suppliers on the web - though I'm not sure what the quality differences are between MP3 and Apple's AAC formats


    AAC stands for Advanced Audio Codec which as its name implies, is a better format than MP3. Having said that, MP3 has improved immeasurably in recent years, so I would operate on this simple rule of thumb : to compare the two, simply go one step higher for MP3. In other words AAC 128 is roughly the same as MP3 160 (and so on, up the scale).

    As Amazon sells MP3 in 256kps quality, you can be confident it should sound better than the DRM AAC 128 that iTunes sells, but not quite as good as iTunes Plus.