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Yellow Warning Triangles

4873 Views 6 Replies Latest reply: Apr 2, 2009 11:42 PM by Beverly Maneatis RSS
nogar Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
Mar 18, 2009 1:55 PM
I made a book in iphoto and for some reason there is a yellow warning triangle at the top of every picture and page (evens pages with only words that do fit in the box). And when I try to preview the book it loads halfway then comes up with a notice saying, There is a problem with the photo with the filename “n55266606723501403857.jpg.” The full resolution version of this photo either cannot be located or is corrupt. Please replace this photo or delete it from your book, then stops. And when I clicked "buy book" to see what would happen and it says, One or more photos in your book may print at too low a quality based on the design you have chosen. Do you want to continue?

How do I fix this???
macbook, Mac OS X (10.5.6), using iLife '08
  • LarryHN Level 9 Level 9 (54,915 points)
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    Mar 18, 2009 2:02 PM (in response to nogar)
    nogar

    Welcome to the Apple user to user assistance forums

    The yellow triangle indicates a problem on the page it appears on

    On a text page the most common problem is too much text that will not all print

    On a photo it is that the photo will print at under 180 dpi which may create a quality problem

    There is a problem with the photo with the filename “n55266606723501403857.jpg.” The full resolution version of this photo either cannot be located or is corrupt


    This could indicate a corrupted library

    So for a photo that has the warning what size is the frame and what are the pixel dimensions of the photo?

    Basically if you continue and purchase Apple will not stand behind the quality because you were warned - I often purchase books with warnings on photos and have never been unhappy - but I do it knowing exactly what risk I am taking

    Your best bet is to have no warnings which means you need to print smaller photos or use higher resolution photos

    LN
    2.1 GHz iMac G5 with 500 GB internal HD, Mac OS X (10.5.6), iPhoto 8.0.1, 750 GB OWC EHD, Sony DSC-W150 camera, ATP PhotoFinder Mini GPS
  • Old Toad Level 10 Level 10 (113,315 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 19, 2009 9:48 AM (in response to nogar)
    Welcome to the Apple Discussions.

    The full resolution version of this photo either cannot be located or is corrupt.


    That sound like the original file may be missing or the link to it broken. Find that photo in the Photos mode and try to edit it. Report back what you get.




    TIP: For insurance against the iPhoto database corruption that many users have experienced I recommend making a backup copy of the Library6.iPhoto (iPhoto.Library for iPhoto 5 and earlier versions) database file and keep it current. If problems crop up where iPhoto suddenly can't see any photos or thinks there are no photos in the library, replacing the working Library6.iPhoto file with the backup will often get the library back. By keeping it current I mean backup after each import and/or any serious editing or work on books, slideshows, calendars, cards, etc. That insures that if a problem pops up and you do need to replace the database file, you'll retain all those efforts. It doesn't take long to make the backup and it's good insurance.

    I've created an Automator workflow application (requires Tiger or later), iPhoto dB File Backup, that will copy the selected Library6.iPhoto file from your iPhoto Library folder to the Pictures folder, replacing any previous version of it. There are versions that are compatible with iPhoto 5, 6, 7 and 8 libraries and Tiger and Leopard. Just put the application in the Dock and click on it whenever you want to backup the dB file. iPhoto does not have to be closed to run the application, just idle. You can download it at Toad's Cellar. Be sure to read the Read Me pdf file.


    NOTE: iPhoto 8's new option in the library rebuild pane, "Rebuild the iPhoto Library Database from automatic backup" may make this tip obsolete. We'll know when users have occasion to use it and see if that's the case.
    G5 2 Core 2GHz, 4G RAM; MBP 2.16 Ghz 2G RAM; 750/250 GB HDs;, Mac OS X (10.5.6), 22" LCD, Canon: SD700IS/i850/8600F, Epson R280; 4G Nano, 30G Video iPod
  • LarryHN Level 9 Level 9 (54,915 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 19, 2009 8:00 PM (in response to nogar)
    No - it is not possible to make photos better than they are

    print smaller photos or use higher resolution photos


    Those, as previously stated, are your options

    So for a photo that has the warning what size is the frame and what are the pixel dimensions of the photo?


    If you would answer this question we might be able to give some more advice

    LN
    2.1 GHz iMac G5 with 500 GB internal HD, Mac OS X (10.5.6), iPhoto 8.0.1, 750 GB OWC EHD, Sony DSC-W150 camera, ATP PhotoFinder Mini GPS
  • Beverly Maneatis Level 5 Level 5 (7,155 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 2, 2009 11:42 PM (in response to nogar)
    It depends on your own assessment of 'really bad.' In my experience, the photos in my books look pretty much like the original photos. If the original is blurry, fuzzy or underexposed, it will appear that way in the book. If you are looking to create a professional-looking coffee table quality book, you need to begin with higher resolution, quality digital photos. If you want a memory book of photos through the years, you need to expect that the early out-of-focus shots will be that way in your book. But, if your purpose is to capture those special memories for a family member or a friend, remember that most people will treasure the book and enjoy seeing those photos of themselves and others from years past.

    I have made several books using primarily old black and white snapshots, some color snapshots and even a few old polaroids. Many of them received the yellow triangle warning icon. I wanted the particular snapshots in the book even if iPhoto thought they were not good enough. I even zoomed in on one person in a group shot. It was pretty blurry, but still usable. The recipients of my most recent book loved it, old snapshots and all. Some of the photos were from almost 50 years ago. Apparently, the photos brought back great memories of the 'old days.'

    If you like the book you have made, order it!
    iMac 24" Intel, 2GB RAM, 320GB; 3 ext drives: LaCie, WD, Mac OS X (10.4.11), iLIfe 08, iMovie 6.0.4

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