8 Replies Latest reply: Apr 15, 2009 2:53 PM by R C-R
Hi I'm A Mac Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
I used Carbon Copy to clone my laptop hard drive.
When I boot and have old hard drive mounted via external, it won't (example), show me the DOWNLOADS folder contents.

Sure enough, if I put the hard drive BACK in the laptop, the files show up fine.

There is no SPARSE image that I can see that needs authentication.

Any ideas what could be causing the problem?

Thanks

Mac Pro x 2, Mac Book Pro 2.4 2 GB Glossy, Had Matte for 6 months, Mac OS X (10.4.10), TIGER and LEOPARD
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,115 points)
    Hi

    What pray tell is Fire Vault?

    Allan
    tiger
  • Hi I'm A Mac Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
    It's in Security for Apple.

    It encrypts all the users folders, that way, if someone steals your laptop, they cannot access your hard drive by booting, or attaching via external.

    System Preferences, Security, Fire Vault.

    Thus I need someone with Fire Vault experience in retrieving the data.

    Thanks
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,115 points)
    Hi

    I think if you look at that bit closer you will notice that it says FileVault and not Fire Vault.

    Even with that additional I am still unable to figure out exactly what your question is when I go back and read your original posting. Sorry.

    Allan
    tiger
  • Hi I'm A Mac Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
    Ok, if someone wants to enlighten me, please do.

    It turns out, while it was attached externally and that FireVault was turned on, the folder (image) was hidden and only showed up in terminal like this:

    .hidden folder

    With the "." this indicated it was hidden. What a friend of mine did was use the mv (move) command to move it while also renaming it to another place on the hard drive, this unhid the folder. When I double clicked on it, I was then asked for my password and was able to have access to the files.

    What I would like to know are all the terminal commands.

    1) I had to make sure that I was in ROOT while on the external hard drive.
    What is the command to get to ROOT on the external.

    2) I had to type a command to see the hidden folder.
    What is the command? I think it was LS?

    3) I had someone use a move while renaming command that unhid the folder, what is this command, something with a -a in it I believe.

    I really want to master the TERMINAL and would appreciate it if someone could tell me the above commands and what steps are necessary if they had to do this again, basically, logging into root, looking for the hidden file name, moving it while renaming it.

    Thank you so much.
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (14,930 points)
    First, it is "Filevault" & not "Firevault."

    Second, if you want to "master" the command line interface (Terminal), you must learn that typos & lack of attention to exact names & spelling can & often will cause you no end of grief in that totally unforgiving environment.

    Third, 'mastering' the command line interface is easy if all you mean is learning how to enter commands. It is extremely hard if you mean understanding how & when to use the hundreds of commands & their options to achieve some particular purpose.

    This is because the command line exposes you to the UNIX heart of the OS that the GUI hides from you. See Mac OS X 10.5 Help: Using UNIX in Mac OS X and Mac OS X 10.5 Help: Getting help for UNIX commands for more about this.
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,115 points)
    Hi R C-R;

    Thank you for your admirable answer while I was attended a board meeting. I think you covered the question quite well.

    Allan
    tiger
  • nerowolfe Level 6 Level 6 (13,070 points)
    Hi I'm A Mac wrote:
    Ok, if someone wants to enlighten me, please do.

    It turns out, while it was attached externally and that FireVault was turned on, the folder (image) was hidden and only showed up in terminal like this:

    Since you do not know the difference between FireVault (which I have never heard of) and FileVault, I suggest that you keep away from the terminal.
    .hidden folder

    With the "." this indicated it was hidden. What a friend of mine did was use the mv (move) command to move it while also renaming it to another place on the hard drive, this unhid the folder. When I double clicked on it, I was then asked for my password and was able to have access to the files.

    Again, stay away from the terminal until you know more.
    What I would like to know are all the terminal commands.

    There are thousands and it is far too detailed to discuss in a forum like this.
    You should check into the Unix forum here:
    http://discussions.apple.com/forum.jspa?forumID=735
    And you should get some books both on Leopard, which covers &FileVault* and some books on Unix and terminal programming, shells, etc.

    1) I had to make sure that I was in ROOT while on the external hard drive.
    What is the command to get to ROOT on the external.

    Very dangerous to use root when you do not know what you are actually doing.
    2) I had to type a command to see the hidden folder.
    What is the command? I think it was LS?

    Again, before using the terminal, learn about it.
    3) I had someone use a move while renaming command that unhid the folder, what is this command, something with a -a in it I believe.

    I really want to master the TERMINAL and would appreciate it if someone could tell me the above commands and what steps are necessary if they had to do this again, basically, logging into root, looking for the hidden file name, moving it while renaming it.

    Thank you so much.


    Books - - get books and study.
    And don't use tools that you are not fully qualified to use unless you have a full working backup of your OS.
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (14,930 points)
    I think it is admirable that the O.P. wants to master the CLI, but at the same time I don't want to give him or her the idea that it is easy or in any way comparable to the highly refined & user-friendly environment of the Mac GUI, or that Terminal is just another application.

    I sometimes cringe when I see user advice that involves using the CLI to do something that can be done with the GUI. Without adequate warnings accompanying that advice, it is too close for comfort to giving someone a loaded gun & just saying, "all you have to do is point it at the problem & pull the trigger."