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Time Capsule and OpenDNS / DynDNS

5941 Views 7 Replies Latest reply: May 23, 2009 9:37 AM by Tesserax RSS
Knage Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
May 22, 2009 10:47 AM
Yes.. yet another question on the subject.

Of course it would be best if Apple just made the AEBS (Time Capsule) support DDNS, but as that isn't the case yet (and may never be), I am trying to come up with a workaround.

Is it possible to use a Time Capsule as a Bridge/Range Extender for my Linksys WRT54G?

or set it up so that my Linksys WRT54G is the router connected to the internet (doing DDNS) and the Time Capsule is the Wireless transmitter?

it's like (well it is) connecting a router to a router.. it this possible? can the internet connection pass through two routers?


Now please don't suggest I use a DNS update client on my computer, as that is what I'm trying to avoid.
  • Tesserax Level 8 Level 8 (47,620 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 22, 2009 1:55 PM (in response to Knage)
    Hello Knage. Welcome to the Apple Discussions!

    Is it possible to use a Time Capsule as a Bridge/Range Extender for my Linksys WRT54G?


    You can definitely connect the Time Capsule (TC) directly to the Linksys via Ethernet. It may also be possible to connect the TC wirelessly to the Linksys in a WDS ... although this has only been confirmed with the 802.11b/g AirPort Extreme Base Station (AEBS) and has been reported on the Internet. (Just do a search for AirPort, Linksys, & WDS.)

    or set it up so that my Linksys WRT54G is the router connected to the internet (doing DDNS) and the Time Capsule is the Wireless transmitter?


    Basically the same answer as the first configuration - no problem by Ethernet, possibly wirelessly in a WDS.
     Mac Mini 2.0 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 320 GB HD, Mac OS X (10.5.7),  MacBook 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 160 GB HD  PowerMac 1.2 GHz G4 1.5 GB RAM
  • Tesserax Level 8 Level 8 (47,620 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 22, 2009 2:23 PM (in response to Knage)
    When connecting by Ethernet, you will basically be setting up a "dual-band" network; one band for the Linksys and the other for the TC. This will allow you to set up two separate wireless networks, one for 802.11b/g clients and the other for 802.11n clients to take advantage of bandwidth performance. The key is to reconfigure the TC as a bridge to allow the Linksys to continue to provide both NAT & DHCP services for both networks. This then would allow clients on either wireless network to "see" each other.

    To set up the Time Capsule (TC) as a bridge, either connect to the TC's wireless network or temporarily connect your computer directly (using an Ethernet cable) to one of the LAN port of the TC, and then, using the AirPort Utility, change this setting:

    Internet - Internet Connection tab
    o Connection Sharing: Off (Bridge Mode)
    o Click Update to apply the new settings.
     Mac Mini 2.0 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 320 GB HD, Mac OS X (10.5.7),  MacBook 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 160 GB HD  PowerMac 1.2 GHz G4 1.5 GB RAM
  • Tesserax Level 8 Level 8 (47,620 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 22, 2009 4:54 PM (in response to Knage)
    Well actually I only want the TC to take care of the wireless stuff (disabling Wireless in the Linksys) all I want the linksys to do is DDNS the TC should preferably take care of everything else.


    Ok, then your setup should even be easier, and besides disabling wireless on the Linksys, you will just need to reconfigure the TC as a bridge with the steps I provided earlier.
     Mac Mini 2.0 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 320 GB HD, Mac OS X (10.5.7),  MacBook 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 160 GB HD  PowerMac 1.2 GHz G4 1.5 GB RAM
  • Tesserax Level 8 Level 8 (47,620 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 23, 2009 9:37 AM (in response to Knage)
    I only wish that Apple would make their routers support DynDNS, or even better OpenDNS directly.


    Yes, supporting DynDNS, as an option, would be a nice feature. However, It can, indirectly support OpenDNS. You would just need to add the OpenDNS DNS servers IP addresses to the DNS Server(s) textboxes on the AirPort Utility > Manual Setup > Internet > Internet Connection tab.
     Mac Mini 2.0 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 320 GB HD, Mac OS X (10.5.7),  MacBook 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo 4 GB RAM 160 GB HD  PowerMac 1.2 GHz G4 1.5 GB RAM

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