Previous 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next 149 Replies Latest reply: Apr 9, 2010 4:44 PM by jice0 Go to original post
  • Graham Perrin Level 2 Level 2 (255 points)
    a bug or a design decision done to perform the equivalent of the BIND "rotate" functionality


    I wonder whether clues re: design may be gained from differences between
    <http://www.opensource.apple.com/source/configd/configd-212.2/get-mobility-info? f=text>
    and (in the tree for 10.6.1)
    <http://www.opensource.apple.com/source/configd/configd-289/get-mobility-info?f= text>
  • William Kucharski Level 6 Level 6 (14,890 points)
    Update:

    Apple closed my bug:

    <pre>Mac OS X internal name resolution often uses DNS servers in reverse order</pre>

    as a duplicate of Bug ID #6928835, so they know about it and are investigating it.
  • jafau Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Snow leopard had some strange DNS settings in the network preferences (airport, advanced) greyed out - they were screwing up my connection. I took the DNS settings from my router (the ones supplied by the ISP) and entered them in the network preferences, this fixed the problem for me.
  • sduensin Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    William Kucharski wrote:
    The external record is coming from somewhere - Mac OS X isn't just making it up.

    So either a manual DNS server is specified somewhere that is being queried, or the SmoothWall is occasionally returning the external entry.

    Either way, it sounds like a problem that can be solved in configuration.


    I sure wish I knew where. It's just completely bizarre. I've never had issues like this prior to Snow Leopard. No other system does anything like this (some Leopard, some OS 9, some ugh Vista, and a lot of Linux). It's just my one Snow Leopard box. Makes me think it's not SmoothWall.

    Scott
  • William Kucharski Level 6 Level 6 (14,890 points)
    jafau wrote:
    Snow leopard had some strange DNS settings in the network preferences (airport, advanced) greyed out


    Settings that are greyed out are those being provided to you by your DHCP server.

    Typically this is your router, and routers often advertise themselves as the DNS server so that all queries go through the router and it can cache the results from all lookups done on the network to provide faster service.

    What you've done is bypass the router and are directly querying your ISP's name servers each time.

    However if you were having problems before that means there is a bug or some other issue with the way your router handles DNS requests.
  • xpmatrix Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
  • William Kucharski Level 6 Level 6 (14,890 points)
    Unfortunately that has nothing to do with the precise bug being discussed here, where mDNSResponder is deciding to alter the order in which DNS servers are queried from that provided manually or by a DHCP server.

    That issue remains extant in Mac OS X 10.6.1.
  • tgil Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I was having DNS problems with Snow Leopard and tried a ton of stuff to fix it. I finally got it fixed.

    My problem had nothing to do with DNS. To find the problem, I ran a "verify disk" in Disk Utility and found a Invalid Sibling Link. I followed the instructions at http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20070204093925888. Basically, it says run fsck_hfs -r /dev/disk0s2 while booting from the install CD and unmounting the drive. I had to run fsck_hfs -f /dev/disk0s2 before the problem was fixed. The disk was successfully repaired, and I am back on the internets.

    Even if you don't have a "Invalid Sibling Link" error but you do have some other error on the disk, try just doing a "repair disk" in Disk Utility.

    I really hope this helps someone out.
  • RobertLHoward Level 2 Level 2 (165 points)
    William Kucharski wrote:
    That issue remains extant in Mac OS X 10.6.1.


    I still see it in 10.6.2
  • William Kucharski Level 6 Level 6 (14,890 points)
    Yep - still there in 10.6.2, but it wasn't on the list of issues 10.6.2 addressed, either.

    I've no idea of whether it's something Apple considers proper behavior or if it just hasn't escalated far enough to be addressed.

    Either way it would merely be speculation for me to comment further on its status (and speculation is against the AD Terms of Use), so your guess is as good as mine.
  • RobertLHoward Level 2 Level 2 (165 points)
    At some point in this thread a bug was reported and then closed as duplicate. Can anyone here report on the status of the surviving bug report (without breaking rules)?
  • Johanjpk Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    We have the same problems. If this isn't fixed we are going back to 10.5. Then we would have to go back to 10.5 with the server also.
  • gpy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Would be useful now to understand if this is happening to all the new installations or just from migration (from Leopard to Snow Leopard), and also which kind of carrier... because in my case, this happens only connected to DSLs... not in the Office LAN/WAN (where there is a proxy...).

    I say this because it seems the percentage of the mDNSres failures is higher on machine coming from migration and discretely lower with clean installations...
  • William Kucharski Level 6 Level 6 (14,890 points)
    RobertLHoward wrote:
    At some point in this thread a bug was reported and then closed as duplicate. Can anyone here report on the status of the surviving bug report (without breaking rules)?


    Probably not.

    Apple's bug reporter only allows you to check the status of bugs you opened yourself.

    Therefore if a bug is closed as a duplicate, you are given the bug ID of the original bug, but cannot check its status.

    So unless the creator of that bug is reading this thread, we'll never know unless it's fixed in a future update.
  • MuddyBulldog Level 2 Level 2 (215 points)
    gpy wrote:
    because in my case, this happens only connected to DSLs... not in the Office LAN/WAN (where there is a proxy...).

    That's because in an environment where you have a web proxy your DNS settings are not relevant for external queries, the proxy does it's own DNS lookup (since it's the "client" connecting to the "web server")
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