7 Replies Latest reply: Sep 21, 2009 4:12 PM by Pondini
maclover01 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Just got new SL today.i dont have any external hard drive to make back up,cos it gonna cost me extra money buying.Can i just upgrade to Snow leopard without backing up?

Message was edited by: maclover01

Macbook, Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • V.K. Level 9 Level 9 (56,130 points)
    if you are asking if this is technically possible then the answer is yes. is it advisable? absolutely NOT. I would NEVER consider upgrading without having a full backup. it may work fine but if it doesn't you'll be in very serious trouble.
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,735 points)
    Hi maclover01;

    How important is your data to you?

    If you data is worth nothing then of course you can do the upgrade. If on the other hand you place any kind of value on your data that I would say don't do the upgrade until you have a backup.

    Now that we opened the box of how valuable is your data, you really should have a back up now. It is never a question of if data is going to be lost it is only a question of when it will be lost. So I strongly suggest you develop a good backup plan ASAP.

    Allan
    tiger
  • JasonFear Level 5 Level 5 (4,935 points)
    I'm with V.K. on this one. There isn't any scenario where I'd (personally) recommend doing an update without having a backup. Even a basic little update to iTunes, Safari, iLife, etc. An update is never designed to purposely break something but it happens. A backup is always a good idea, because unfortunately you just never know when something might go wrong or cause a problem.
  • maclover01 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Thank you guys.but am i suppose to buy an external drive same size as my hard drive? or can i use less?and do i need to do back up always? i have been using my macbook for some time now and i never use the time machine once.do u suggest it important to have a data back up?
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,735 points)
    Hi maclover01;

    It is only important to have a backup if your data is important. If you can stand to lose all of your data that you can continue the way you are going. Lose of data will happen sooner or later.

    If like most user you consider your data valuable then you really should start doing some kind of backup to protect your data.

    As far as disk size goes if you are going to use Time Machine then it is suggested that the external drive should be 2 to 3 time larger then what you are backing up at least.


    Allan
    tiger
  • donv (The Ghost) Level 5 Level 5 (4,600 points)
    You can use a smaller one, but external drives are very inexpensive now and storage demands keep increasing. So, I buy the largest one you think you are able to afford.

    Personally, I would move to Sno unlesss I had an external drive with a bootable clone of my internal on it. I think that there is enough risk in going to Sno that such conservatism is warranted.

    Message was edited by: donv (The Ghost)
  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,720 points)
    maclover01 wrote:
    Thank you guys.but am i suppose to buy an external drive same size as my hard drive? or can i use less?and do i need to do back up always? i have been using my macbook for some time now and i never use the time machine once.do u suggest it important to have a data back up?


    You should do regular backups of your entire system, or at the very least, your important data (and that includes things like your configuration and email setup, as they're often not easily re-entered).

    ALL hard drives fail: some sooner, some later. Other awful things happen on occasion, too. Your Mac is made of mechanical and electrical parts, and they do fail now and then. When something does, if you have no backups, you may lose everything.

    You can use Time Machine to an external disk; or wirelessly to a Time Capsule or USB drive attached to one of the newer Airport Extremes, or a shared drive on another Mac running Leopard or Snow Leopard on the same local network. Some other apps may also back up to network drives, or a service like Mozy, for a monthly fee, will back up to one of it's servers.

    For Time Machine, since it keeps copies of things you've changed or deleted for a time, you'll need 2-3 times the space of what it's backing-up. For a "clone" (such as made by CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper), which only has a copy of the current contents of your system, you should have a disk the same size as your internal HD, but in a pinch you'd be ok with one that's at least 15% larger than the amount used on your internal HD.

    If you're interested in Time Machine, you might want to review these:

    Time Machine Tutorial
    Time Machine 101
    How to back up and restore your files
    Time Machine Features
    Apple - Support - Mac OSX v10.5 Leopard Time Machine

    and perhaps browse the Time Machine - Frequently Asked Questions *User Tip.*