4 Replies Latest reply: Oct 28, 2009 8:46 AM by Tesserax
iPeg Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Ok, fellow Apple boardies - someone please explain this to me like I'm 4.... I have a recently purchased MacBook, my first, and I'm hooked up at home with a DLink so that the rest of the family can use the PC while I have the Mac. I have wi-fi in the home with no weak signals or anything thanks to the DLink. I purchased an AEX thinking that when I travel, I will be able to have service. But wouldn't I have service anyway when I travel without the AEX? I mean, that's the whole deal with having a laptop, right? So, bottom line, now that I have this AEX, when would I use it? Is it strictly based on wi-fi? I would really appreciate a bottom line, down-to-earth answer, because since I went "Mac", I'm feeling like a real idiot. Thanks all!

Mac Book 4GB / iPhone, Other OS
  • Tesserax Level 8 Level 8 (48,985 points)
    I purchased an AEX thinking that when I travel, I will be able to have service. But wouldn't I have service anyway when I travel without the AEX? I mean, that's the whole deal with having a laptop, right? So, bottom line, now that I have this AEX, when would I use it? Is it strictly based on wi-fi?


    Here are a few good reasons to hang onto your AX:

    o One good reason to have the AX when traveling is not all hotels, that have Internet access, do not provide a wireless connection. You could then use the AX to provide that wireless connection for your laptop.

    o Another would be similar in that you are visiting a friend or relative that only has wired access.

    o You can also use the AX as an Ethernet bridge to allow a wired client, in a room distant from the D-Link, to get Internet access.

    o You can connect a USB printer to the AX, and then, "join" the AX to the D-Link's wireless network to share that printer.

    o Finally, you can use the AX for streaming iTunes (or other audio sources) from your Mac or PC to a set of powered speakers or a stereo system.
  • iPeg Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    So, even though I'm hooked up with the modem, I may not be able to get internet service when I travel? I thought that once your laptop is linked to the modem, you can pretty much go anywhere and be able to log onto the internet. Or is it the fact that this is all based on Wi-Fi? I hope that makes sense and I didn't ramble.
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (86,970 points)
    When you are traveling, hotels usually offer either a wireless connection or there is an ethernet port that you hook up to with your computer using an ethernet cable.

    If the hotel has an ethernet jack, you can plug the Express in and create your own private wireless network in your room.

    Not sure what you mean by modem when you are traveling. Are you referring to a wireless USB adapter that plugs into your computer and allows you to connect anywhere you go? If so, you won't need the Express when traveling.
  • Tesserax Level 8 Level 8 (48,985 points)
    Makes total sense. Your MacBook is equipped with both Ethernet (for wired) and an AirPort (for wireless) access to a network ... or the Internet. The other side of that equation would be the network that you would be connecting your MacBook to. Most hotels, coffee shops, public places, etc. provide wireless (or Wi-Fi) access. In almost all cases, your MacBook's AirPort should be able to connect to these.

    In turn, most of these established Wi-Fis get their Internet access through a series of networking equipment that can include wireless routers, switches and modems.

    As I mentioned, not all of these establishments provide Wi-Fi and may only provide wired access to the Internet. This is one case, where the AX would come handy as it can be connected to this wired access, and in turn, create a Wi-Fi for your use.