9 Replies Latest reply: Feb 12, 2010 2:17 PM by Brian Postow
Brian Postow Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
This isn't exactly programming related, but I figured developers need to know this sort of thing. Does anyone have a good site that discusses the relative market share of various versions of OSX?

For example, If I write a product that requires 10.6, what percentage of the mac market am I alienating? 10.5? etc...

So, far the only site I've seen, I can't seem to find anymore... thanks.

Mac Mini, Mac OS X (10.6.2)
  • K T Level 7 Level 7 (23,700 points)
    Brian, this is just my opinion, but targeting a specific OS is always a risk. People pay big money for research showing what the most current numbers are. Some people also elect to target hardware instead, such as Intel versus PPC.

    While one dev works to avoid a niche market, another may find gold in the same. I think most will decide to work the numbers tho.

    And even this has issues...if you were to strictly work numbers, you might decide to support another platform all together. I never worry about alienating one segment, I look at it as encouraging those outliers to move up.

    In the end, it is always a moving target and down to the individual to decide. I think the best you can do is to make sure that when you begin a project you don't work on a platform that is near EOL. Try to do something that has legs.

    wikipedia has good info, but I don't see hard numbers on current OS favorites, etc.
  • etresoft Level 7 Level 7 (26,275 points)
    What would require 10.6? You can write a program that runs in 10.5 and can take advantage of 10.6 capabilities, if present.
  • Brian Postow Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    The real question is 10.4 vs 10.5... (On one level, heck, I'm just glad I've talked my boss into dropping 10.3...)

    I'd like to be able to use like IKImageView which came out in 10.5...
  • Brian Postow Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    The question is what libraries I can use. Do I not use IKImageView because it doesn't exist in 10.4?

    Legs in this company are ... different in other companies... We've still got products running on 10.3 systems...
  • K T Level 7 Level 7 (23,700 points)
    We've still got products running on 10.3 systems...


    And the keyword there is 'products'. Targeted products.

    So what's the real issue...how to reduce the number of targets? Or how to choose which to continue to support and which to abandon? Or where to put resources for best ROI?

    Not unlike other companies at all. This sort of internal debate happens continuously in meetings around the world every day
  • Brian Postow Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    true. The real question is a ROI question I guess. Is it worth losing some customers in 10.4 in order to make it easier to write the product that will only work in 10.5+?
  • etresoft Level 7 Level 7 (26,275 points)
    Brian Postow wrote:
    true. The real question is a ROI question I guess. Is it worth losing some customers in 10.4 in order to make it easier to write the product that will only work in 10.5+?


    I wouldn't put it like that. That implies that you are "losing" "current" customers. You aren't. Anyone who has your software and runs it on 10.4 will still be your customer. You already have your money.

    People who don't have your software and still run 10.4 can still buy the old version, so you aren't losing them either.

    The only risk you have is people who have 10.4, will not upgrade the OS, but want to upgrade your software. Even here, you aren't "losing" anything. How big is this market? How big is the potential market for current customers running 10.5 who would like new features that take advantage of their OS upgrade? How big is the potential market for future customers who want "up-to-date" software that leverages all the new features of the current OS?
  • Brian Postow Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    Ok. You've convinced me, and I think I Might just be able to convince my boss!

    wish me luck.

    The step after that is to convince Apple that the fact that their IKImageViewDemo uses methods of IKImageView that aren't documented is a bug in the documentation, an NOT a bug in the demo, and that the line that says that IKImageView can accept an NSImage, but there is no documentation of how is a bug in the lack of documentation, and not claiming things that don't exist. (The method DOES exist, it's just not documented)
  • Brian Postow Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    Oh, but that's a totally different issue, for a different time.