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  • cokeicee Level 1 Level 1 (90 points)
    kennmsr wrote:
    cokeicee wrote:
    not to get into this but 9.99 x 3 is 29.97 not 27.97
    just saying

    Sorry I was using Numbers on my iPad ;-D, because the iPad doesn't come with a Calculator App like the iPhone or iPod Touch (Senior Moment)

    Message was edited by: kennmsr



    okay that was funny.
  • kreme Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
    For the record, I never said people had no 'right' to be disappointed. I said I'm 'surprised' they're disappointed. I'm 'surprised' that people thought a program would do something it never said it would do. What is 'not' said about a product by its vendor, regardless of who it's from, is often just as important, if not moreso, than what 'is' said – even if it’s from Apple.

    Also, I didn't have the price wrong for iWork, but thanks anyway. In Canada, the price for iWork (not the family pack) 'is' $99.xx. As for iWork for iPad, I didn't realise the price was compartmentalized, in which case, I will apologise for that typo and agree that the cost is more than I feel iWork for iPad is worth. But still, I just wouldn't expect much from an App, even if Apple made it.

    They make great machines, yes. But their software (minus the few gems) leaves a lot to be desired.

    Maybe it's just me, but I view the iPad as nothing more than a giant iTouch where the functionality would be identical, and given the demonstration that Steve Jobs put on, where he focussed mainly on online functionality (email and the web - not much more), music, and movies, I wouldn't expect iPad to focus on office functionality as much as it does on media at this present point in time, regardless of whether they made an iWork ‘Lite’ for it or not. Though, I agree that maybe the name should have reflected the limitations, and the direction of the iPad could change drastically in the near future.

    All of that aside, I look forward to getting an iPad when it’s available here because I’d like more screen real estate for my reading, and I was considering getting iWork out of curiosity and for simple word processing until I read this. For that, I'm thankful that I came across this topic and think I may just stick with QuickOffice for now; until I find something that may be more suitable.

    As for a limited email program, or any program - you’re right - I wouldn’t be happy with limitations I wasn’t expecting, but I wouldn’t be surprised either. It’s also why I read between the lines of what’s not being said before I put my hard-earned cash on the table. This is a commercial-driven market with the mindset that money is disposable in our part of the world. Advertising and sales is designed to do only one thing: sell the product, and that’s done by ‘not’ telling you anything they think you might not want to hear. If the list of what it does is short, be wary.

    Lesson learned, I suppose.

    Message was edited by: kreme
  • cokeicee Level 1 Level 1 (90 points)
    I think that I would pay 100 Bucks for a full version for my ipad but i dont pout because I know in the next year there will updates and programs that will satisfy. Just like when the iphone first came out there were problems. Takes time to perfect perfection
  • Bruce Robbie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    With this lack of functionality, Apple have just lost all chance of an equipment upgrade recommend for our 140 College staff. This will please our Windows brethren no end. Looks like we're going to get Slated instead !!!!
    Bit of an own goal.
  • xenolalia Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Could you be more specific as I am looking also.
  • Bruce Robbie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    We were looking into adopting the iPad as a registration/presentation tool, so we could get eventually rid of our PC towers in every classroom. They are largely only network clients anyway. Most staff produce their presentations at home on laptops and and most of the admin is run in Exchange or web based format. If Smartboard could be transfered to iPad OS then we'd be laughing.
    As the iPad can't handle the simple transfer and presentation of iWorks (an Apple in-house Software Productivity Suite), then it undermines creditability in making it a serious operational tool. Mind you, it's not been sold as such to be fair, just thought the presentation and collection of information via a tablet would be so logical. It is just a Big Media Player at this stage...it clearly needs time to grow up.
  • cokeicee Level 1 Level 1 (90 points)
    Bruce Robbie wrote:
    We were looking into adopting the iPad as a registration/presentation tool, so we could get eventually rid of our PC towers in every classroom. They are largely only network clients anyway. Most staff produce their presentations at home on laptops and and most of the admin is run in Exchange or web based format. If Smartboard could be transfered to iPad OS then we'd be laughing.
    As the iPad can't handle the simple transfer and presentation of iWorks (an Apple in-house Software Productivity Suite), then it undermines creditability in making it a serious operational tool. Mind you, it's not been sold as such to be fair, just thought the presentation and collection of information via a tablet would be so logical. It is just a Big Media Player at this stage...it clearly needs time to grow up.



    I think Its funny because it's been out for less than a week and you expected to throw out your pcs. Maybe you were aiming to high or maybe you need some patience.
  • Bruce Robbie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Check out http://www.lomation.com/

    An iPad version of this would be very very helpful.
  • kreme Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
    Are you familiar with FileMaker?

    It would take some work, but you could probably create something quite similar to that, if not better, with FileMaker.

    Keep in mind that the iTouch/Phone/Pad version of it has some scripting limitations in comparison to the Mac/PC version, and you'll need the Mac/PC version in order to create the original design of the database. But it syncs quite well, and if designed right, works exceptionally well too.

    Of course, this is a more costly solution than iWork, but it's also far more powerful.

    Message was edited by: kreme
  • slpslee Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)
    {quote:title=Floyd Bloom wrote:}Maybe some one has a bright idea on how to retain the Quicktime movie properties and control on the iPad.{quote}


    Take this with a whole shaker of salt because I don't have an iPad yet, but when you export the presentation to a QuickTime movie, can you export it with "Fixed Timing" and then set a manual duration for each slide the way you can in the full version Keynote?

    I truly appreciate everyone's concern and disappointment over the iWork issue, and yet, it doesn't seem all that long ago to me that we loaded up WordPerfect every day on two 5-1/4" floppies and thought THAT was magic. Was that limited? You bet, but the one thing you can count on is that everything evolves, and rather rapidly in the field of technology, so I still plan to get an iPad just for what it does best--it's a great looking multimedia device, and anything else at this point is just icing on the cake to me.
  • Bruce Robbie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    You're probably right on both counts. It just looked like the right tool for the job and it has arrived just when we are having a review of our operational ICT.

    The tablet is seriously considered to be the way ahead for most classroom functions, but the OS format is still up for debate.

    Message was edited by: Bruce Robbie
  • Alexandre Linhares Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I have one quick question (which is a dealbreaker for me). In Keynote, can I import video that's already in the iPad? Is it possible to include a running video that's on the iPod app? Has someone been able to make a presentation with a video?

    Message was edited by: Alexandre Linhares
  • xenolalia Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    What I would say to Apple is that they may have overlooked the value of the iPad to this potential market and should consider refinements to expand their base. In any case, I will try to lecture form the iPad in Korea next week and go from there.
  • Floyd Bloom Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
    The first time I exported my Keynote presentation to a QuickTime movie, even though it was 44 slides long with lots of builds, smart builds and transitions, it was only 1 minute and 20 seconds long, and there's no way I could figure how to stop the movie running on the iPad since there is no space bar.

    Yesterday I set the manual timing for how long for each slide, for each build and that gives me a lot more time per slide, but it will take trial and error timing estimations to end up with a manageable presentation and even then every slide will have exactly the same visualization time, which is not the preferred way to give a talk.

    Nevertheless, you get to retain your preferred fonts and layout, although you obviously lose all the presenter notes. It migh work this way-- I got my VGA cable output plug this morning so I may give it a try. However, I now have a hiatus from speaking for a couple of months so maybe there will be the longed for upgrades to these iWork-on-iPad apps.
  • Bob deWitt Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    As an art history professor, I, too, will add my voice to this discussion. I was excited about the possibilities of using Keynote presentations in class; however, my enthusiasm for the iPad has been considerably dampened by what I have seen written here. While I don't need lecture notes, I do use fonts that are not in standard font collections, plus I include a number of movie clips of architectural-recreation animations and of Google Earth sites that I create. If these cannot be run in a presentation, then the device becomes less useful for me.

    On the other hand, it seems that Keynote presentations on the iPad would make a great on-site teaching tool for Study Abroad applications, even with the limitations that have been noted in this thread.