6 Replies Latest reply: Apr 17, 2010 5:01 AM by The hatter
neilkna Level 1 (0 points)
I have tried installing Safari 3 times on my new Windows 7 64-bit desktop. My wife loves Safari from using it on our XP system. However, in Win 7-64, it comes up as an "Incompatible" program. It runs just fine, works OK, except when I go to shut down the system, I get the blue screen of death. Shutdown, or even Restart, results in a hung system with the eventual BSOD. Am I missing something, or is Safari for Windows just not going to work with Windows 7 64-bit version? System info is Asus P7P55D Pro motherboard, 8 Gb RAM, i7-860 cpu, 1 Tb HDD, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit, ATI Radeon 5750 GPU, Avast antivirus, Windows Firewall.

CyberPower, Windows 7, 64-bit, i7-860
  • b noir Level 9 (72,060 points)
    However, in Win 7-64, it comes up as an "Incompatible" program. It runs just fine, works OK, except when I go to shut down the system, I get the blue screen of death. Shutdown, or even Restart, results in a hung system with the eventual BSOD.


    Unusual ... are the BSODs referencing a specific file name at all? If so, what is it called? (Precise spelling and filename extensions like .sys or .dll, please.)
  • Doc M Level 3 (785 points)
    b--

    'Scuse me for barging in...

    I'm wondering if a total removal of Safari has occurred prior to the reinstall? Seems to me I remember another thread with this issue, and the solution was to make sure all traces of Safari was removed. (I could mistaken, however.)

    Doc
  • b noir Level 9 (72,060 points)
    Hi Doc!

    Feel free to barge in. That's a good point.

    I'd also completely remove Apple Application Support as well, and take a few other explicit precautions just in case something has been getting damaged during the installs.

    On a 64-bit system, I'd go about it this way:

    *Preliminary phase*

    Download and save a copy of the Safari installer to your hard drive. (Don't run the install on line, and don't start the install just yet.)

    http://www.apple.com/safari/download/

    Quit iTunes and/or QuickTime if you have them open. (They both use Apple Application Support, and if they're open, they'll interfere with the Apple Application Support uninstall.)

    *Uninstall phase*

    Open your "Uninstall a program" control panel.
    Uninstall Safari.
    Uninstall Apple Application Support.

    Next we'll remove any leftover program files and folders.
    Open "My Computer".
    Open your "C" drive (or whichever drive you store your program files on).
    Open the "Program files (x86)" folder.
    Right-click on the "Safari" folder (if it still exists) and select "Delete".
    *Staying in Program Files (x86),* open the "Common Files" folder.
    Open the "Apple" folder.
    Right-click on the "Apple Application Support" folder (if it still exists) and select "Delete".
    Empty your Recycle Bin.

    *Reinstall phase*

    Restart the PC. (If iTunes is installed on the PC, you'll probably receive a message at this stage saying that iTunes will not run because Apple Application Support is missing. Click through the message.)
    Do not open any applications.
    Disconnect from your network and/or the Internet.
    Disable all security software (firewall, antivirus and antispyware).
    Now start the Safari install by doubleclicking the SafariSetup.exe file you downloaded earlier. (This install will also reinstall Apple Application Support.)

    Reenable all security software prior to reconnecting to your network and/or the internet.

    Does the blue screen still hit with a fresh Safari and AAS in place?
  • neilkna Level 1 (0 points)
    Thank you b noir, you helped me resolve it. My wife will now be happier with my new computer as she will have Safari to browse with. Your clean install instructions helped significantly. I knew where to find Safari and even to look for Apple ... but did not know about them being in the Common Files as well. That gave me the clean advantage.

    Now, even during the new clean install, Safari still installed the auto updater even though I specifically selected NOT to auto-update. In my few days using Windows 7 64-bit, I have found that 32 bit programs mostly appear to work just fine ... until they load an auto update component. That results in BSOD's on both shutdowns and restarts. I uninstalled the Apple Auto-Updater in Control Panel and am now good to go.
  • b noir Level 9 (72,060 points)
    Excellent news, neil.

    Now, even during the new clean install, Safari still installed the auto updater even though I specifically selected NOT to auto-update.


    Yeah, as far as I can tell unchecking the checkbox for "Automatically check for updates" doesn't stop ASU from installing, but rather stops it from setting up its automatic check for updates. (On XP and Vista it sets up a weekly Windows "scheduled task" with a default for automatically running and checking every week ... I'm not entirely sure exactly how it is handled in Windows 7.)
  • The hatter Level 9 (60,930 points)
    Apple SU will always get installed, and can be used to manually check for updates. Just not auto download and install (hopefully).

    Never had trouble lately, though I think back with Vista x64 Apple software was really a problem.

    I used Windows 7 beta, RC and release and never had a problem, and nothing I have does an auto update. For AV I stuck with Microsoft Security Essentials - and there does seem to have been issues with almost any other. Same probably with Acronis, Paragon and other system backup programs.

    One of the biggest issues are with pre-installed systems; demo and trialware (out of date, not current, not even supported) where a clean retail install eliminates poor behavior and issues with iTunes and other programs not installing.

    If you aren't now, I'd check msconfig and disable services and items; and CCleaner.

    The trouble with auto updates is you don't know if they really are safe or tested, especially when it has come to Apple's software. Wait a week at least before you do anything and make sure to have backups and that you can rollback or restore point.

    I'd suspect something in your system though is faulty, whether software, RAM or something else. I've assembled three X58-based systems and none have BSODs.