Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next 391 Replies Latest reply: Oct 24, 2014 10:19 AM by 1201studio Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • GaBeech Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Just a little note on why I started this thread.

    I started it because there seemed to be a lot my iMac's symptoms being talked about in different places and in different ways.
    Where people had experienced 2 of my symptoms, it seemed to be happening in the same order;
    Horizontal lines across screen.
    System freezes under load.
    System freezes whist idle.
    Vertical lines on screen.
    Graphical glitches in Finder windows.
    Graphical glitches in Application windows.
    System freeze/lock up after using Time Machine.
    Random reboots.
    Recapping boards - I imagine this means replacing capacitors.
    Theory's that problems stemmed from the 'Logic Board'.
    Theory's that problems stemmed from x1600 graphics.
    Issues with OS X 10.6.3
    (One of the first possibilities I discounted by trying 10.5, Linux, Windows. All with same *hardware problems*.)

    There are most likely a few more things that made me raise my eyebrows and try to look deeper.
    I have experienced all of the list, apart from 'Recapping Boards', theory's are theory's and I have no issue with OS X.

    There seemed to be so many problems that I had been victim to in such a short period of time, on the same machine, I could not ignore it.
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (14,875 points)
    Helen Berman wrote:
    Why don't you do a simple search of horizontal lines, glitches etc. rather than serial number.


    Because there is no correlation with serial numbers that results from such a search. Because it guaranties extreme sampling bias. More fundamentally, because correlation does not imply causation.

    There are any number of extremely long threads on the subject some of which also have links to other internet sources including some form of class action.


    Sure. And there are long threads & attempts to gain support for class action suits for almost anything imaginable. Anybody can suspect anything they want & find supporters for their ideas. That doesn't excuse them from tests of their plausibility based on common sense, science, or any other reasonable standard.

    I am not sure what the point of this discussion is. There seem to be a significant number of people having identical problems with machines made at approximately the same time. You seem intent on disputing any sort of anecdotal evidence.


    I'm not disputing it, only reminding people that it is anecdotal & should not be mistaken for anything else.

    I posted merely to provide the initial poster with confirmation that he wasn't alone in his having this problem with a machine made in this time period as have a number of other people.


    What time period? The W86 prefix only narrows it down to iMacs made in the same factory any time in 2006. The next two characters in the serial number specify the week it was made. As long as they are not also specified, not only are the reports anecdotal they are also woefully incomplete.
  • GaBeech Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Hello,

    I asked early on in this thread for people to be so kind as to leave the first 5 characters of there serial.
    Not that I am trying to run a strict survey as such, mainly to clear things up in my own mind.

    As R C-R mentioned the first 5 characters will definitely convey;
    Build Factory - 1 or 2 Characters
    Build Year - 1 charector
    Week of Build Year - 2 charector
    If everyone who feels like posting, even to state that thier Mac is good, posts the first 5 characters or thier serial. That helps me decide on how interpet the things I read and decide if I was just an unlucky chap.

    I have also briefly mentioned that the reason I started this thread was to bring a little focus to alot of things I read from various places.
    I am trying to focus on my iMac not working and the reasons why not, there were alot of symptoms/events that gathered importance and effect in a short period of time. Granted these are all over the net, in forums and what have you. Yet, usually enclosed in seperate subjects and not even considered to be linked in any way. Some of the info is on boards where people are not shy about replacing the capacitors themselves... I'm a home user. I may have a soldering iron, but I think that should stay in the cupboard.
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (14,875 points)
    GaBeech wrote:
    Yet, usually enclosed in seperate subjects and not even considered to be linked in any way. Some of the info is on boards where people are not shy about replacing the capacitors themselves…


    FWIW, I think you are referring to what is colorfully known as the "capacitor plague" that most famously caused Apple, Dell, & several other major electronics makers to issue recalls of certain products that had bogus electrolytic capacitors installed in them, most often in power supplies. However, the cause of problem was identified & quickly corrected in subsequent production runs of these products & never affected any iMacs besides certain G5 models in a specific serial number range.

    But that hasn't stopped poorly researched speculation that it somehow applies to other iMacs, & like many other Internet-spead fables based on half-truths probably never will die.
  • GaBeech Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Just a quick 'lol'...

    I noticed a fair few days ago, an act of 'noobism' I am guilty of...

    I asked people where they were based, when it is clearly stated at the side of peoples posts.

    I'm such a NOOB...

    I wish I had working system to work my noob magic with.
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (14,875 points)
    I asked people where they were based, when it is clearly stated at the side of peoples posts.


    Don't feel alone. We used to be able to see the location info in the bottom section of a reply window (in the "Replying To:" box) just like in the topic view. Due to some new quirk in the software that runs Discussions, that is no longer true.

    Until I noticed that change, I assumed usually incorrectly that anyone I was posting a reply to had neglected to supply location info in their profile, & sometimes complained about that in my reply. Very embarrassing!

    So it isn't just a NOOB thing.
  • Trebor-Mesos Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    If it helps imac with the video problems - W86xxxx
  • adolfsson Level 2 Level 2 (335 points)
    Get most of the symptoms and it crashes when temp hits around 64-67°C. I use iCyclone to keep it down. Planning on adding a small fan on the outside to get some more air through.

    SN# W8651...

    And about the post on how long you'd expect a computer to last... Well, I would still use my Performa 475, but the RAM and mhz makes internet browsing a pain. My G4 tower (Sawtooth) still runs fine, so does the two G3 B&W. So I'd expected this iMac would keep on going until lightning strikes and melts it down to a puck mouse...
  • azureRad Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    My iMac is having similar issues lately: horizontal lines followed by slowness, followed by beachball of death. The issue is getting worse and increasing in frequency. It's vintage 2006, I'm in the US. And I also think my iMac should be lasting longer than this...

    iMac5,1
    2 GHz
    serial: W8648...
    running OS 10.4.11

    ...massively annoying and frustrating...
  • GaBeech Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Trebor-Mesos wrote:
    If it helps imac with the video problems - W86xxxx

    Could you provide the next two characters of your serial, which indicate the week your iMac was built.
    Keep me posted, if your iMac develops any more issues.

    Thanks
  • GaBeech Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    adolfsson wrote:
    ...And about the post on how long you'd expect a computer to last... Well, I would still use my Performa 475, but the RAM and mhz makes internet browsing a pain. My G4 tower (Sawtooth) still runs fine, so does the two G3 B&W. So I'd expected this iMac would keep on going until lightning strikes and melts it down to a puck mouse...

    I agree completely.

    I was just being conservative with what I wrote on a forum about hardware life expectancy.
    If a piece of electronic equipment lasts the first 12 months, then it is probably set to outlast the amount of time someone would want to keep using it.

    I think a 5 year life should be demanded by a user and forced by the manufacturer.
    A 10 year life and beyond, should be expected by all.
    Granted, mechanical parts need service and maybe replacement over time...
    ...My circuit boards should be doing just fine, 3 years down the line.
  • GaBeech Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Trebor-Mesos wrote:
    If it helps imac with the video problems - W86xxxx

    Which country are you based in Trebor-Mesos?
    I'm in the UK, just consumer law will differ in various places.
  • Trebor-Mesos Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I'm in the US
  • pbcubed Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)
    adolfsson wrote:
    Get most of the symptoms and it crashes when temp hits around 64-67°C. I use iCyclone to keep it down. Planning on adding a small fan on the outside to get some more air through.


    Bet those in this thread have seen the other recent similar one:
    http://discussions.apple.com/thread.jspa?threadID=2389074
    Some differing thoughts have been hashed out in it. Not looking for agreement on the situation as humans tend to disagree but I think some good points have been made.

    My own experience has been w/2 iMacs circa 2006 with two differing problems; the common(?) horizontal line/artifact/GPU one & a bad AC/DC PS (in upper-left when facing front of unit - the warmest area). My own opinion is that the elevated temps typical of the design, over 3 or 4 yrs, may have contributed to these failures.
    Both these iMacs are still in use as I caught the artifact issue early on (installed 3rd party fan/temp control software & configed it to try to keep temps <= 60C) & replaced AC/DC PS in the other one. Raised both CPU & HDD fan speed mins to 1600rpm (HDD fan feeds same side as AC/DC PS. Makes me feel better, YMMV & good luck.
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (14,875 points)
    I think a 5 year life should be demanded by a user and forced by the manufacturer.


    OK, but how much more are you willing to pay to get that? Nobody sells electronics for the sheer joy of it; they all have to maintain a profit margin that lets them stay in business, develop new products, keep their stockholders happy, etc.

    On the average, Macs are still among the most reliable & long lived computers on the market, at least according to everything I've ever seen. To increase the average life much more will not be cheap & ultimately customers have to pay for that one way or another.
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