8 Replies Latest reply: Aug 16, 2010 12:23 PM by Geoff Tucker
pmerchant Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
So if the new Mac Mini offers an HDMI port, does this mean I can hook it up to any HD monitor or HD television and watch HD content from iTunes without having to worry about HDCP restrictions?

Ergo, has the Mac Mini just replaced Apple TV?

MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.3)
  • Jolly Giant Level 7 Level 7 (25,440 points)
    pmerchant wrote:
    So if the new Mac Mini offers an HDMI port, does this mean I can hook it up to any HD monitor or HD television and watch HD content from iTunes without having to worry about HDCP restrictions?


    it would seem so - as long as monitor and HDTV support HDCP.

    Ergo, has the Mac Mini just replaced Apple TV?


    you might find this discussion interesting, especially the 3rd post in the thread: http://discussions.apple.com/thread.jspa?threadID=2461714&tstart=0.

    JGG



    edited by the Jolly Green Giant (where Green stands for environmentally friendly)
  • pmerchant Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I guess I am asking if the HDMI connection negates the HDCP restrictions. I know that my Samsung HDTV does not support HDCP because I connected my MacBook Pro to it with a VGA cable. But will get the same message if I connect a Mac Mini with an HDMI cable?
  • Jolly Giant Level 7 Level 7 (25,440 points)
    pmerchant wrote:
    I guess I am asking if the HDMI connection negates the HDCP restrictions.


    i cannot imagine that Apple would sell a product that circumvents HDCP restrictions.

    JGG

  • Fortuny Level 7 Level 7 (21,430 points)
    Hi and welcome to Discussions,

    pmerchant wrote:
    I know that my Samsung HDTV does not support HDCP because I connected my MacBook Pro to it with a VGA cable.


    That might be the problem.

    Quoting from here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-bandwidthDigital_ContentProtection

    "HDCP protects content using authentication and encryption. Before sending HDCP-protected data, the transmitting device initiates an authentication process to confirm that the receiver is authorized to receive the data. Once the receiver has been authenticated, the transmitter encrypts the data stream to prevent eavesdropping and sends it to the receiver."

    Using a VGA-cable which transmitts data analog not digital prevents the authentication process and thus prevents the sending of the data.

    Regards

    Stefan
  • pmerchant Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Yes, I understand this.

    My question is will I be able to watch HD content on the HD TV if the connection to the computer is an HDMI cable?
  • Jolly Giant Level 7 Level 7 (25,440 points)
    pmerchant wrote:
    will I be able to watch HD content on the HD TV if the connection to the computer is an HDMI cable?


    in order to view protected HD content (i.e. movies/tv shows you purchase from the iTS), the HDTV must supports HDCP.

    JGG

  • BSteely Level 5 Level 5 (7,635 points)
    I know that my Samsung HDTV does not support HDCP because I connected my MacBook Pro to it with a VGA cable.

    ???
    If your TV has HDMI inputs on it, then it supports HDCP by definition.
  • Geoff Tucker Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I ran into this problem for the first time today. I use screen sharing to control my Mac Mini hooked up to my HDTV a lot of the time - it's easier than plugging a mouse into the mini or using HippoRemote via my iPhone.

    I tried to fire up a show I downloaded from iTunes and got this message.

    Instead, if I use the Apple Remote to start Front Row, then everything plays just fine - in HD or SD.

    My recommendation is to run things that way and you should have no problems. For people running Plex, etc., I can't speak to that since it will run many more formats and I import all my media into iTunes to make it controllable via Apple remote on the TV.