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rbsiv Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
The past couple days I was doing some testing on a computer running Windows 7 64-bit. I noticed that while using Internet Explorer, any embedded Quicktime media would prompt the surfer to download Quicktime when in fact it's already installed on the system.

When I'd approve the download/installation anyhow I'd get a brief pause, then nothing. No error message, but IE still did not have QT capabilities. Tried multiple times, still no luck.

Is QT even compatible with IE 64-bit? It's a concern for me not because I actually use IE (and certainly don't want to get into an argument over the merits of various OSs and browsers), but because I'm presenting a large archive of Quicktime videos and I want them to be compatible with a variety surfers' systems.
  • b noir Level 9 Level 9 (72,015 points)
    I noticed that while using Internet Explorer, any embedded Quicktime media would prompt the surfer to download Quicktime when in fact it's already installed on the system.


    Can you doublecheck your existing QuickTime version for me please, rb?

    Open the QuickTime Player. Go "Help > About QuickTime Player". What version shows up for you in there?
  • rbsiv Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Thanks for the reply.
    QT is version 7.6.6 (1671)
  • b noir Level 9 Level 9 (72,015 points)
    Good, that's thoroughly up to date. That rules out one possibility (QuickTime hasn't been installing properly during attempts at updates).

    Checking now on the other main (actually, most common) possibility. One thing that can cause relentless "out of date" messages when your QuickTime *actually is* up to date is old QuickTime componentry stashed in unorthodox ocations on the PC. (If it's in a non-standard location, it's not removed by the installer for the latest version of QuickTime ... so it stays behind, your system sees it when you try to use your QuickTime, and that triggers the "out of date" messages.)

    We'll go searching for that sort of thing in the most common location for misplaced QuickTime componentry on a 64-bit system.

    First we'll need to adjust some View settings on the PC.

    1. From the Start menu, click Open.
    2. In the Organize menu, click Folder and Search Options.
    3. Click the View tab.
    4. In the "Advanced settings" pane under "Hidden files and folders" make sure that the "Show hidden files and folders" option is selected, and the "Hide extensions for known file types" option is unchecked.
    5. Click OK.

    Now we'll go hunting.

    Go "Start > Computer"
    In "Computer" open "Local Disk C:" or whichever drive your operating system is installed on.
    Open the "Windows" folder.
    Open the "SysWOW64" folder.

    What files and/or folders can you see in there with QuickTime in the file and/or folder name? On a PC with a standard QuickTime install, you should see precisely two QuickTime files ... QuickTime.qts and QuickTimeVR.qtx ... and no QuickTime folders whatsoever.
  • rbsiv Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Yup, it's a relatively clean install. Just those two files, no folders.

    I should specify that IE is the only browser getting the prompt to install QT, the others do fine.
  • b noir Level 9 Level 9 (72,015 points)
    Hmmmm. Trouble with the QuickTime ActiveX control perhaps? That would cause an IE specific browser issue. (The other browsers would be using QuickTime plugins.)

    In IE 8, go "Tools > manage Add-ons". Select "All Add-ons" and check the two QuickTime objects. Are they both showing a version of 7.6.6 (1671)?
  • rbsiv Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I'm only seeing one QuickTime object in there, but yes, that is the version.
  • rbsiv Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I should add that IE 32-bit works as normal, it's only the 64-bit version that appears unable to load Quicktime.
  • b noir Level 9 Level 9 (72,015 points)
    Interesting. I think you ought to have two QuickTime objects in there. (I just checked on the wife's 64-bit Vista lappie, and she's got two.)

    In your Apple sections of the add-ons are you also seeing a "QuickTimeCheck Class"? If so, what version is that one showing?
  • rbsiv Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Actually I need to correct myself. The 32-bit version of IE has the one QT object listed in add-ons (and this works fine). The 64-bit version has no QT objects, despite my attempts to install.
  • b noir Level 9 Level 9 (72,015 points)
    The 64-bit version has no QT objects, despite my attempts to install.


    Well, that's the problem identified ... now we just have to work out how to fix it.

    Before proceeding ... how is it that you come to have both the 64-bit and 32-bit versions of IE on the PC? (I don't spend a lot of time using 64-bit systems.) Is that a standard sort of thing on a 64-bit Windows 7? Or have you installed the 32-bit version on there in addition to the 64-bit version?

    (Just checking to see if there's something a bit unorthodox in play or not on the box.)
  • rbsiv Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I believe at this point it's standard to have both. I just installed the OS last week and both versions of IE were included.
  • b noir Level 9 Level 9 (72,015 points)
    Good-O.

    Working on the principle that this might be caused by some subtle damage to the QuickTime program files relating to ActiveX controls, I think we should try a clean uninstall/reinstall of QuickTime, taking a few other explicit precautions along the way (just in case).

    First, download and save a fresh copy of the QuickTime installer from the Apple Website. (Don't run the install on line, and don't start the install just yet. Get the installer that doesn't mention iTunes.)

    http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/

    Now head into your Uninstall a program control panel. Uninstall QuickTime.

    Next we'll clear away any leftover program files and folders.

    In "Computer" open "Local Disk C:" or whichever drive you have your *program files* installed on.

    Open the "Program Files (x86)" folder.
    Right-click on the "QuickTime" folder (if it still exists) and select "Delete").

    Go back into "Local Disk C:" or whichever drive you have your *operating system* installed on.

    Open the "Windows" folder.
    Open the "SysWOW64" folder.

    Right-click on the QuickTime.qts and QuickTimeVR.qtx files (if they still exist) and select "Delete".

    Restart the PC.

    After the PC restarts, do not open any applications (especially not either of the IE 8 browsers). Disconnect from your network and/or the internet. Now switch off all your security software. (Firewall, antivirus, antispyware.)

    Now start the QuickTime reinstall by doubleclicking the QuickTimeInstaller.exe file you downloaded earlier.

    (This may also update your Apple Application Support to version 1.3.0 ... I'm not sure whether or not the QT 7.6.6 installer bundle has been modified to include the new version yet.)

    Reenable all security software prior to reconnecting to your network and/or the internet.

    Did the QuickTime install seem to go through okay?

    If so, fire up the 64-bit version of IE 8 and browse to a website containg QuickTime content ... like Apple.com, for example. Do you get asked by IE to install the ActiveX component this time around? If so, does it install properly this time?
  • apple_ixodid Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I have the same issue as the original poster and I have gone through all the steps above.

    When I opened IE and went to a page requiring QT, the Information Bar read "This website wants to install the following add-on: 'QuickTime' from 'Apple Inc.'. If you trust the website and the add-on and want to install it, click here...

    I clicked on the Information Bar and at the prompt, I clicked "Install." Then nothing happened.

    What should I try next?
  • Anthony Faye Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Don't expect too much, 32bit only QuickTime player will never have a companion of 64bit ActiveX interface. Apple does not implement any 64bit code on MS OS platform. Ask Apple to develop QuickTime player 64bit first, and then ask to develop 64bit ActiveX control for IE. (Adobe Flash now has preview version of FlashPlayer for 64 bit)
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