6 Replies Latest reply: Jul 22, 2010 6:56 PM by theboilermaker
Randallcw Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
I am looking to purchase a new Imac 27" computer. I am also a quicken user on a PC. How much of a problem would it be to install windows on the mac for the sole purpose of running quicken 2010? Any suggestions as what I could expect for this type of installation?

iMac, Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (11,080 points)
    Randallcw wrote:
    I am looking to purchase a new Imac 27" computer. I am also a quicken user on a PC. How much of a problem would it be to install windows on the mac for the sole purpose of running quicken 2010? Any suggestions as what I could expect for this type of installation?


    You can install Windows two ways, using Parallels or Fusion (Virtual Box may work as well) or using Bootcamp. Using a virtual machine such as Parallels or Fusion causes Windows and OSX to share your computer's resources such as RAM. Using Bootcamp allows Windows to use all your computer's resources as though Windows was installed natively.

    Using a virtual machine may cause Windows to run a little slower than using Bootcamp. Either way, Quicken will run as though installed on a PC.
  • Dave Dahle Level 1 Level 1 (60 points)
    If you're just using ONE Windows app, then the best option would be one of the virtualization apps (Parallels / VMWare).

    Keep in mind that for the Boot Camp or virtualization applications, you will need a Windows CD and key. Also, you will need to take the same protection measures on the new installation - Windows will still be Windows even when running on Apple hardware.
  • BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (11,080 points)
    Dave Dahle wrote:
    *If you're just using ONE Windows app, then the best option would be one of the virtualization apps (Parallels / VMWare).*


    Why do you say that? If the one application is a heavy user of system resources then Bootcamp would be the better choice since Bootcamp allows Windows to use all the system resources.


    Keep in mind that for the Boot Camp or virtualization applications, you will need a Windows CD and key. Also, you will need to take the same protection measures on the new installation - Windows will still be Windows even when running on Apple hardware.
  • hart40 Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
    For Quicken? Quicken doesn't seem like it would be using much of the system resources at all. Rebooting every time you wanted to look at your budget would be a pain in the neck. Using a virtualizer would be much smoother for one low-impact app.

    That said, since you have to buy Windows anyway it seems like trying the free version of virtualBox first would be a good idea to start out with just to save money.

    And next question would be isn't there a mac-compatible finance application that could import the quicken data you already have? Might be worth looking into.
  • BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (11,080 points)
    hart40 wrote:
    *For Quicken? Quicken doesn't seem like it would be using much of the system resources at all.* Rebooting every time you wanted to look at your budget would be a pain in the neck. Using a virtualizer would be much smoother for one low-impact app.

    That said, since you have to buy Windows anyway it seems like trying the free version of virtualBox first would be a good idea to start out with just to save money.

    And next question would be isn't there a mac-compatible finance application that could import the quicken data you already have? Might be worth looking into.


    I think I said above to the OP that Quicken would run fine in either a virtual environment or in Bootcamp. I was responding to the poster who said if you only have one program then the better solution would be the virtual machine. The poster did not specify Quicken. He only said for one program use a virtual machine, which is not always the correct answer. Regardless, I think the OP got the answer to his question.
  • theboilermaker Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Two years ago, I bought a new IMac and the Apple based Quicken 2007 CD-R. I have used Quicken for over 10-years on Windows machines. Two really BIG problems with the Intuit Quicken for Apple program. My original files were very large with years of historical data, stock trades, etc, and the conversion process was cumbersome and faulty. I had 4 master files to convert (each family member), and once I got one to work with limited data, the Quicken format, data sort, etc was horrendously bad. Nothing looked at all like the Windows based operations and it was extremely slow on the new iMac. So I removed the Quicken/Apple program, and limped along with a very old underpowered Window XP Gateway and Quicken 2007 Professional software. However, this year 2010, Intuit "pulled" their support, killing my ability to tell Quicken to go and get the bank files, credit card charges, stock prices, etc. So now I need to resurrect the Apple Quicken. Our local Apple Store tonight advised using Boot Camp, buying new Windows Quicken 2010, and installing on my iMac. Which I will do.

    Now how do I get the iPad App to communicate with my iMac to query the Financial records? If it can be done, then I most certainly buy the most powerful iPad. And if not able to check the records via the iPad, then 'no sale'.