12 Replies Latest reply: Jul 6, 2010 10:35 AM by Kappy
iColor Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
why are keyboard shortcuts different on different apple hardware?
for example, the cmd + > will on some machines 'scroll' through open windows within an application. on other machines, i can't find a shortcut for that.
and the cmd + spacebar will on some machines open spotlight, on other machines, this is default ctrl + spacebar, and you would have to go into the system settings to change that.
why these differences, and how can i get my user accounts on all the macs i'm using to respond in the same way?

MBP 2.6GHz C2D 10.6.3, MP 2x2GHz DC 10.5.8, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (244,795 points)
    See the following for standard shortcuts: Mac OS X keyboard shortcuts. Once in an application it's always possible the application defines it's own shortcuts or overrides a standard OS X shortcut with one of its own. And, let's not overlook the fact that you are comparing over two different versions of OS X.

    To answer your last question: You will need to start by installing the same OS on both machines. Next, you will need to put the same Home folder on both machines.
  • iColor Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    hello
    sorry, my 'model' info wasn't updated.
    the different machines i use, - altogether 12 mbp's, mp's and imacs, are all updated to the last version. this is part of what i do at work. well, a couple are leo and tiger for compatibility reasons.
    so system version is not the point.
    and i was talking about system kind of shortcuts, not individual software's.
    so sorry, that's not the point either.

    my impression is that mac pro's have different default system shortcuts than other macs.
    anyone else who could confirm this?
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (244,795 points)
    I've not noticed that, and I have a Mac Pro and several laptops. There are differences in how the function keys work depending upon the particular model. Newer models have different function key programming than older models.
  • iColor Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    could you confirm if the cmd + < key combo (or cmd + > for backwards) will flip through open windows within the foremost app?
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (244,795 points)
    The shortcut for what you've asked is COMMAND-SHIFT-~. The last character is the tilde.
  • iColor Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    ok, then i see.
    i've installed the system in different languages on the different machines.
    i did this because running some software is easier to troubleshoot on an english system.
    then, it seems, the shortcuts are different on systems running different languages.
    to make this even more confusing, of course keyboard layout differs as well.
    so, on a english system running a norwegian keyboard, your suggested shortcut would actually be cmd + shift + ´
    on a norwegian system with a norwegian keyboard, it is actually cmd + >

    but thank you anyway, you sort of helped me find out.
    but it actually touches on two sore toes; 1.: keyboard shortcuts are not universal, 2.: most information concerning the matter is very america-centric (but,hey..)
    in general this keeps many 'foreigners' from participating in discussions, also because they don't know the english terms for every (or any) system function.
  • jimblu Level 1 Level 1 (50 points)
    command-tab cycles through applications and command-tilde (`) cycles through the windows of the frontmost application. it's really perfect once your muscle memory gets used to it. just keep your thumb on command and then tab to the open application you want, lift your thumb for a second then bring it right back down on tab and tilde through the open windows. tilde is right above tab.

    not sure what os your using bur apple's keyboard commands and very standard and mostly unchanged in years. you might want to go to /system preferences/keyboard/keyboard shortcuts/ and set them all to their defaults.

    also, command-] moves forwards in windows and command-[ moves backwards in windows. -- like finder windows, etc.

    command-shift-left arrow through safari tabs to go backwards, command-shift-right arrow to go forward through safari tabs.


    but one you get command-tab and command-tilde, and command-[ and command-] figured out with your muscle memory, you got the most important part of keyboard navigation down.
  • jimblu Level 1 Level 1 (50 points)
    gonna make me spell them cause they are html tags


    but once you get command-tab and command-tilde, and command-left bracket and command- right bracket figured out with your muscle memory, you got the most important part of keyboard navigation down.


    yeah that lol
  • jimblu Level 1 Level 1 (50 points)
    and just to make sure your modifier keys are at their defaults -- /system preferences/keyboard/modifier keys.../restore defaults
  • iColor Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    jimblu wrote:
    command-tab cycles through applications and command-tilde (`) cycles through the windows of the frontmost application.

    that's the point, don't you see? when installing the system in another language than english, the commands are different. what's for you cmd + tilde, is for me cmd + >
    jimblu wrote:
    it's really perfect once your muscle memory gets used to it.

    yes, that's my point too. that if my muscle memory is used to one language of the system, muscle memory gets confused when moving to another.
    jimblu wrote:
    just keep your thumb on command and then tab to the open application you want, lift your thumb for a second then bring it right back down on tab and tilde through the open windows. tilde is right above tab.
    not sure what os your using bur apple's keyboard commands and very standard and mostly unchanged in years.

    except now we're being anglo-centric again. but perhaps you wouldn't know. so i'll tell you again: BOTH shortcuts AND keyboard layouts are different in different languages.
    jimblu wrote:
    you might want to go to /system preferences/keyboard/keyboard shortcuts/ and set them all to their defaults.

    only thing being that the command for cycling windows of foremost application is not on the list. most of my shortcuts are at default, except spotlight is sometimes default ctrl + space. i like better cmd + space.
    jimblu wrote:
    command-shift-left arrow through safari tabs to go backwards, command-shift-right arrow to go forward through safari tabs.

    on my systems, to move between tabs in safari is ctrl + tab. that's actually default on my english systems too!
    jimblu wrote:
    but one you get command-tab and command-tilde, and command-[ and command-] figured out with your muscle memory, you got the most important part of keyboard navigation down.


    to sum up; i won't sum up. it's a mess. that's a pity. cause we all want to be able to move between different systems with 16GB worth of muscle memory. we paid for that with our time.
    also, you anglos; humble down ☻
  • jimblu Level 1 Level 1 (50 points)
    i see -- my bad. i didn't know you were installing different languages.

    let me just leave this parting -- mmm advice, for lack of a better word. and this will depend on if your preferences have what my preferences have. in system preferences/language and text/input sources/ there a little box you can check at the bottom that says "show input menu in menu bar." once you do that, pull down to "show keyboard viewer" and a floating keyboard will show up. so as you press various keys on your keyboard, you can see, visually, the effect of the key you press.

    but much more importantly, in all the pull down menus, in every application that exist, the keyboard command shortcuts are listed in the pull-down menus. for example, in the Finder, under the Go menu, one can see shift-apple-C next to the word "computer" in the pull-down menu. likewise, under File in the Finder one can see command-n next to the words "New Finder Window." so as you go through different languages, you can see what keyboard commands are unified, and any differences.


    i know the answer to your problem with this lies in the /system preferences/language and text/input sources/ i think you need to enable all the languages you want to use on every machine -- so every machine has the same six or seven languages enabled on them, under Input Sources. when i enabled three languages on my machine, some more preferences magically appeared (honestly) in the Input Sources tab in the Language and Text prefpane. once you have all the same languages enabled on all your machines, then you need to click the "Keyboard Shortcuts" button and unify everything manually and fix the ones that have an exclamation point next to them.


    lol it is a mess. i'll tell ya what. i go to this site called macupdate.com that list about 80 shareware application daily. i read through them in my spare time; it's my hobby. and one day i'm sure i'll come across a shareware application designed just to fix this problem you are dealing with. when i do i'll email you link to the application. i am bookmarking this page so i'll be able to email you if i ever come across what u need. whew --

    here's some i looked for real quick: http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/34172/keyboard-pilot

    http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/6134/quickeys-x

    http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/14495/ukelele

    http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/14861/keycue

    http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/25141/keyremap4macbook

    yeah i'm a WASP but i was bored and you gave me a puzzle to try and solve -- now i'm a wore out wasp -- you couldn't have an easy little problem could you. eeeee goodnight
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (244,795 points)
    No, they aren't, unfortunately, because of differences in keyboard layouts and used characters between different languages. Things would be much simpler if everyone spoke, read, wrote, etc. in the same language, but that's not going to happen.