7 Replies Latest reply: Oct 8, 2010 9:11 PM by jonnat1126
Delta313 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
(1) ONE MAJOR ANNOYANCE is that when trying to convert a very large collection of MP3 into AAC using Itunes 9.2, every few hundreds files, it will come upon a bad MP3 and will stop the conversion process altogether for the entire collection.

Having some bad MP3 in your collection is a normal situation, and is part of life, but when Itunes encounter such a file, it will display a popup saying there was an error during conversion, and STOP RIGHT THERE, leaving the conversion process half completed.

Why can't Itunes skip the bad file and continues to the next file? Instead of that, I have to click ok, reselect my entire collection excluding the bad file and the files that have been already been converted, and restart the conversion process all over again. Instead of taking a day for the AFK conversion, it took over a week, of starting and stopping, and I had to watch the process to restart it EVERY SINGLE TIME there was an error. THAT WAS PRETTY ANNOYING.

(2) One other MAJOR BUG is that once a MP3 is converted, the original remain in the library alongside with the converted AAC file, thus creating a duplicate THAT YOU HAVE TO REMOVE MANUALLY. Logically when you want to convert a file to AAC, you expect to end up with only a converted AAC file, not the ORIGINAL plus THE CONVERTED in the library. Please add an option to remove the original from the library once the conversion is done successfully, so you don't end up synchronising a bunch of duplicates files into your Ipod, these can takes a lot of space.

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(3) One last BUG is that if you select by mistake a file that was already converted, instead of skipping that file, it will convert it again, thus creating another duplicate file again.

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All these are ANNOYANCES, please correct them for the benefit of all Itunes users, thanks!

iPhone OS 3.1.3, Windows XP
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,485 points)
    What is the reason you are converting MP3 to AAC? Is there some application you have that requires only an AAC file?
    Anything that plays AAC will also play MP3 so there is no need to convert to AAC.
    The only thing you are doing is making a file with less quality (converting from one lossy format to another).

    If you have bad MP3 files, use this -> MP3Val
    (3) One last BUG is that if you select by mistake a file that was already converted, instead of skipping that file, it will convert it again, thus creating another duplicate file again.

    How would iTunes know it is a mistake? Perhaps you wanted to convert it again for some reason...

    Send ideas and suggestions here -> iTunes application feedback
  • Katrina S. Level 7 Level 7 (24,090 points)
    I completely agree with you on point #1. iTunes should write an error message to a file saying WHICH file it's having a problem with, and continue on, and display an error with all the problem tracks at the end, or tell you where to find the error message file so you can read it. Later. After the conversion is done.
    Error messages would be nice not just on file conversions, but also with importing, syncing ipods, and consolidating libraries.



    I don't agree with #2, because some people want the original files. It shouldn't take long to get rid of the originals manually, by sorting on dates. The originals will all have an older date.


    I also don't agree with #3 because the import/conversion settings could have changed, and that might be what the user wants.



    I see what you're saying, though. My advice is the same as Chris' -- submit feedback to Apple. This is just a user-to-user forum. You won't get any reply, but at least by submitting feedback, somebody at Apple will read it.

    Message was edited by: Katrina S.
  • Delta313 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    The main reason is that I want to fit a 80GB mp3 collection into a 64MB Ipod touch, so the easiest way is to convert to aac, using a variable bitrate of 80kbits on average. I know its is not the best sound quality, but its is good enough for my average listening.

    I tried many tools to convert mp3 to AAC but none of them will keep the id tag information, so I end up with a converted file but without any genre, artist, or album information. Itunes is the only tool I've found that keeps the Id tags.
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,485 points)
    I tried many tools to convert mp3 to AAC

    If you use VBR in iTunes, the setting is the LOWEST bit rate iTunes will use.
    Personally, I would not use 80 kbps for music. I would put less music on the iPod and go no lower than 128 kbps.
    What bit rate are these files now? If they are more than 128 kbps, you can convert them when adding to the iPod. Select the iPond in iTunes. click the Summary tab and tick *Convert higher bit rate songs to 128 kbps AAC*.
    so the easiest way is to convert to aac,

    You could leave them as MP3. You don't have to convert to AAC to change the bit rate.
  • Moeandoli Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    In itunes when I go to advanced/ the "create AAC version" is not highlighted. How do I enable that button
  • ed2345 Level 7 Level 7 (20,955 points)
    Moeandoli wrote:
    In itunes when I go to advanced/ the "create AAC version" is not highlighted. How do I enable that button


    That selection will be grayed out unless you have highlighted at least one song.
  • jonnat1126 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I have a song highlighted and it is still grayed out. I used to be able to right click on a song to convert it, but no i have to go to advanced. i haven't found any song that i can convert...