3 Replies Latest reply: Jul 15, 2010 12:41 PM by Kevin Brock
SCOTTMEAD Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Hello,
My facility pumps out a ton of mpg4 files. I am tired of changing the settings all the time. I know I can use most recent settings for back to back files, but sometimes we do other things in between. So, anyway to create a new default??

MAC, Mac OS X (10.5.5), 2X3.2 GHZ QUAD
  • Kevin Brock Level 4 Level 4 (2,380 points)
    There are a few way to do this.

    1.) Use Compressor, make a droplet. Look into compressor batch processing: Droplets. You'd set up all the parameters you'd want then save these out as a droplet: a self-contained "application" that holds all your specific settings. I'd export from FCP with current settings, include Audio/Video, whether or not it's self-contained or not, is up to you. (I've always had best results with self-contained movies.) Either way, drop this exported movie onto the droplet. Wait. Done.

    2.) This is sort of old-school. Pre-Compressor days. But you can do it all with QT if you wanted to. Involves using Applescript. Not too involved...but certainly more complex than using Compressor and saving a Droplet. Here's how to do it. ← LINK

    First script, to generate the QT preset would look sort of like this: (Again, this assumes you JUST exported a movie with all the settings you're hoping to "capture.")


    tell application "QuickTime Player"
    tell first document
    save export settings for QuickTime movie to file "Macintosh HD:Users:yourusername:Desktop:Quicktime Preset Name"
    end tell
    end tell


    Second script to handle conversion, using the preset you just saved would look like this:


    tell application "QuickTime Player"
    export document 1 to file "Macintosh HD:Users:yourusername:Desktop:TEST flick" as QuickTime movie ¬
    replacing yes using settings "Macintosh HD:Users:yourusername:Desktop:Quicktime Preset Name.set"
    end tell

    tell application "QuickTime Player"
    close document 1
    end tell
  • SCOTTMEAD Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Thanks. For some reason I don't want to use compressor. Seems like an extra step, but maybe that's bad thinking on my part. I'll look into the other method you provided too. Thanks so much. Have a great day.
  • Kevin Brock Level 4 Level 4 (2,380 points)
    SCOTTMEAD wrote:
    Thanks. For some reason I don't want to use compressor. Seems like an extra step, but maybe that's bad thinking on my part. I'll look into the other method you provided too. Thanks so much. Have a great day.


    You're welcome.

    But, in my mind, the QT route seems slightly more complex. It's the path that has the "extra step". (You'd have to open the exported movies in QT, before pushing "Run" on the Applescript.)

    But to each his own...

    With Droplet:
    1.) Build Droplet in Compressor. (You'd do this ONCE, not every time.)
    2.) Export movie from FCP.
    3.) Drop exported movie onto Droplet.
    4.) Wait. Done.

    With QuickTime/Applescript:
    1.) Generate QT export settings file. (You'd do this ONCE, not every time.)
    2.) Export movie from FCP.
    3.) Open this movie in QuickTime.
    4.) Run the applescript. (This script also holds the 'destination' for the .mp4, so may need modification for some encodes.)
    5.) Wait. Done.

    Too, it's worth noting that another significant boost comes in the form of a Quick Cluster. Compressor can be configured to use ALL the cores on your machine. The more cores = the quicker the encode. QT Pro cannot be configured as such. Article: A “virtual Cluster” Makes an Impressive Speed Boost.

    Anyway, good luck with it. Whichever path you choose.

    (Compressor's going to be faster!)