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Share Ethernet Connection via Splitter?

3003 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Aug 23, 2010 10:24 AM by Raymond Fox RSS
Raymond Fox Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
Aug 19, 2010 3:20 PM
I have an Ethernet cable run from my Mac in my office to my Apple TV in my living room. I also have a PS3 in the living room. Can I use a simple splitter (as shown in the link below) to get both the AppleTV and the PS3 online?

http://www.cellularfactory.com/deals/item-40044_1013.html?eng=dn
3GHz Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.7), 12GB RAM
  • Niel Level 10 Level 10 (234,645 points)
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    Aug 19, 2010 3:22 PM (in response to Raymond Fox)
    Yes. Ethernet is the same.

    (53391)
    iMac Late 2007 Core 2 Duo, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • capaho Level 4 Level 4 (3,650 points)
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    Aug 19, 2010 6:00 PM (in response to Raymond Fox)
    You should use an Ethernet switch rather than a splitter or hub in order to reduce data collision, which could degrade performance on a busy network.
    iMacs Galore, MBP, Mac mini Server, Mac mini HDMI, Antique ATV, iPadPodtouches, Mac OS X (10.6.4), The more I think, the more I think I shouldn't think more.
  • Alley_Cat Level 6 Level 6 (16,625 points)
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    Aug 20, 2010 1:04 AM (in response to Raymond Fox)
    Raymond Fox wrote:
    Thanks Niel. Somehow I got it in my head that I needed some kind of $100 router to split the line or it wouldn't work properly. Nice to know a 69¢ piece of plastic will fill the bill.


    A small 4 port Netgear switch cost me about £20 some time ago, I'd imagine you'd get one for $20-$30 at most, probably far less, and for AppleTV you don't need Gbps ports as AppleTv is only 10/100 Ethernet, though you might consider more modern spec if price differential was small.
    Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • Ge0ph Level 2 Level 2 (385 points)
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    Aug 20, 2010 6:27 AM (in response to Raymond Fox)
    All that will do is combine two connections into one and then split it out to two connections at the other end. It does this by using the two unused pairs to send the second cables signal. It will not create another port out of one port. You need a switch to do that.
    Mac Mini, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • capaho Level 4 Level 4 (3,650 points)
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    Aug 20, 2010 6:08 PM (in response to Raymond Fox)
    Connect the cable from your Mac to the first port on the switch, then connect everything else to the other ports. The switch will manage its own traffic and will effectively turn your Mac into a router. There won't be a bottleneck.
    iMacs Galore, MBP, Mac mini Server, Mac mini HDMI, Antique ATV, iPadPodtouches, Mac OS X (10.6.4), The more I think, the more I think I shouldn't think more.
  • capaho Level 4 Level 4 (3,650 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 20, 2010 6:28 PM (in response to Raymond Fox)
    One more thing to consider, it's true that the ATV maxes out at 100 Mbps on its Ethernet port, but the PS3's Ethernet port is a gigabit port, so you might want to consider a faster switch if the PS3 will be connected to it.
    iMacs Galore, MBP, Mac mini Server, Mac mini HDMI, Antique ATV, iPadPodtouches, Mac OS X (10.6.4), The more I think, the more I think I shouldn't think more.

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