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Disk Utility - HD corrupt...

2875 Views 12 Replies Latest reply: Nov 19, 2010 9:49 AM by Crinkletree RSS
gw82 Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
Sep 17, 2010 12:13 PM
im sorry if this thread is in the wrong section.

I ran a verify disk from my macbook pro and got the following warning:


The volume Macintosh HD was found corrupt and needs to be repaired.

Error: This disk needs to be repaired. Start up your computer with another disk (such as your Mac OS X installation disc), and then use Disk Utility to repair this disk.

So.....iv inserted the start up disk and clicked on verify disk and then repair disk to which is said disk was repaired.

I went straight back into disk utility from my macbook and iv got the same warning. Its as though the disk utility repair disk hasn't repaired anything :-/

any ideas?
macbook pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,535 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2010 12:22 PM (in response to gw82)
    Install OS X and update it on an external drive. All you need is to set aside 20-30GB at most.

    Doing a Safe Boot can help but isn't as good.
    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1564

    Disk Warrior 4.2 is what you need to repair your drive, or there is Drive Genius 3; TechTool Pro 5.07+.
    Hard drives: Recovery:
    http://www.macintouch.com/readerreports/harddrives/index.html
    http://www.macintouch.com/readerreports/harddrives/topic4557.html#d12aug2010
    Mac Pro 9800GTX 10.6.4 /, Windows 7, IE9 Core-i7 3.2GHz / GTX 260 / 10K VelociRaptors
  • Wade Peeler Level 6 Level 6 (10,905 points)
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    Sep 17, 2010 12:44 PM (in response to gw82)
    gw82 wrote:
    ok so id need access to another (external) drive to do that?

    and what benefit would installing OS X onto an external drive be for my existing HD on my macbook pro?

    sorry im abit of a beginner at this type of thing :-/


    I think what The hatter is telling you to do is to set up and boot from OS X on another drive, install DiskWarrior, DriveGenius or TechTool Pro on that other drive, and use one of those applications to repair your drive. They might do a better job than Disk Utility.
    20" Intel iMac 2.0GHz Core Duo, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • Wade Peeler Level 6 Level 6 (10,905 points)
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    Sep 17, 2010 12:58 PM (in response to gw82)
    gw82 wrote:
    i dont really have access to another drive.

    if i took my laptop into the genius bar at my local apple centre would they do the same thing?


    They probably would. I'm sure the genius bar could take care of you.

    However, even if you do go ahead and take your computer to the Genius Bar, you should consider buying an external drive. A vital accessory to every computer is a backup solution, to guard against data loss in case your computer's drive fails. Having an external drive as a backup location has the added benefit of giving you a second drive you can use from which to boot your computer and perform repairs on its internal drive. I also highly recommend the disk utilities that The hatter mentioned; they are often more capable than the Disk Utility included with OS X.
    20" Intel iMac 2.0GHz Core Duo, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,535 points)
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    Sep 17, 2010 1:12 PM (in response to Wade Peeler)
    A good selection of Mac compatible equipment that takes the guess work out of buying that you would have if you shop online @ Newegg or Amazon, and may come with add'l software utilities for reduced discount prices:

    http://www.macsales.com/firewire

    Personally a computer w/o backups doesn't meet minimum requirements, ie, backups (2 or more) are not "optional." TimeMachine was a step into helping insure more people would do and have backups as a first step only. Cloud backups are another.
    Mac Pro 9800GTX 10.6.4 /, Windows 7, IE9 Core-i7 3.2GHz / GTX 260 / 10K VelociRaptors
  • Wade Peeler Level 6 Level 6 (10,905 points)
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    Sep 17, 2010 1:19 PM (in response to gw82)
    gw82 wrote:
    uumm i have a time capsule.....

    so i could use my time capsule as a external drive to boot from?


    I've never used a Time Capsule, but I'm highly skeptical that you could boot from one, as that would require booting from a drive available over a wireless network.

    Still, you don't need a very big drive just to have one to boot from to perform the occasional repair. Have a look at The hatter's link for external drives, or have a look at the external drives they have at the Apple Store if you decide to visit the Genius Bar (though they'll probably be somewhat pricier at the Apple Store).
    20" Intel iMac 2.0GHz Core Duo, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • etresoft Level 7 Level 7 (23,870 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2010 1:38 PM (in response to gw82)
    It is possible that your internal drive is failing. What does Disk Utility say for the SMART status?

    How old is your drive? If it is 3 years old or more, I would just replace it with a new one. With the modern MacOS X operating system, it is unusual for a volume to become corrupt. Plus, new hard drives aren't much more expensive than the 3rd party disk repair tools.

    Locate your most important files and make sure they are getting backed up in Time Machine and/or do a manual backup.
    MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4), + iPad + MacBook 2007
  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,535 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2010 3:11 PM (in response to gw82)
    The first 6 months or less can often be when that new drive fails. Laptop drives have tended to fail more often due to their 'cramped quarters' lack of air and cooling - great place for an SSD.

    Head crashes are rare in this day and age. Most of the time it is the directory, a bad sector but the hardware is otherwise fine as long as there are and the drive can remap bad sector. A bad sector in some (hidden) areas though cannot be remapped without a reinitializing and creating new volumes and partition tables, and of course had to find and diagnose.

    Backup, have spare boot drives, reinitialize 'as needed' and even if the worst happens, you should be up and running, and even swap out hard drive.
    Mac Pro 9800GTX 10.6.4 /, Windows 7, IE9 Core-i7 3.2GHz / GTX 260 / 10K VelociRaptors
  • Crinkletree Calculating status...
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    Nov 19, 2010 9:49 AM (in response to gw82)
    Hi All,

    I hope I am posting to the right place! I ran disk utility and received this as a message. Can anyone help?

    Verifying volume “Mac HD”
    Checking HFS Plus volume.
    Checking Extents Overflow file.
    Checking Catalog file.
    Incorrect block count for file CACHE_003
    CACHE_003
    ,2)
    1077
    1085
    Checking multi-linked files.
    Checking Catalog hierarchy.
    Checking Extended Attributes file.
    Checking volume bitmap.
    Checking volume bitmap.
    information.",0)
    The volume Mac HD needs to be repaired.

    Error: The underlying task reported failure on exit


    1 HFS volume checked
    Volume needs repair
    Mac BookPro, Mac OS X (10.4.11)

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