Previous 1 2 Next 21 Replies Latest reply: Sep 19, 2010 10:23 PM by Allan Sampson Go to original post
  • Allan Sampson Level 10 Level 10 (123,375 points)
    Baloney.

    Photos transferred from your computer are optimized for viewing on your iPhone - the original resolution/size is reduced, which is why transferring these photos in the opposite direction is not supported. Photos on your computer should be included with your computer's backup along with all other important data. The iPhone is not designed or intended to be used as a backup storage device.

    The iPhone not supporting disk mode has everything to do with providing increased security, which the likes of Microslop doesn't have a clue about.
  • Geoff Wales Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    There are many ways to get files on and off the iPhone, using third party software. File sizes may or may not be changed by these apps. There is no reason in principle why the folders should not be available through a Finder or Explorer window.

    It comes down to control, mostly to limit file sharing.
  • Allan Sampson Level 10 Level 10 (123,375 points)
    There is no reason in principle why the folders should not be available through a Finder or Explorer window.


    You were wrong about having access to the iPhone's Photo Library, and you are wrong about this. There is a very important reason, which has EVERYTHING to do with security.

    3rd party apps have their own sandbox on the iPhone.

    http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/Security/Conceptual/Securi tyOverview/Security_Services/Security_Services.html%23//appleref/doc/uid/TP30000976-CH204-CHDDJIDG

    +In iOS, every application is sandboxed during installation. The application, its preferences, and its data are restricted to a unique location in the file system and no application can access another application’s preferences or data. In addition, an application running in iOS can see only its own keychain items.+

    +Because every iOS application is sandboxed, your application’s data and preferences cannot be read or modified by other applications, even if they have been compromised by an attacker. If your application is compromised, the attacker cannot use it to take control of the device or to attack other applications.+
  • Geoff Wales Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Apple has been working on allowing drag and drop file sharing to the iPhone for some time. Whether or not it will actually become available, it is clearly possible to do it.

    http://www.fastcompany.com/1638496/iphone-4-firmware-2010-apple-40-software-file -sharing-widgets-smartphones

    I have large amounts of unused space on my iPhone. The original iPods used to enable users control over how much storage they wanted. It would be very useful to me to use a partition for storage, and to access my music files as well. I also have many GarageBand compositions I would like to share as well as listen to. I would like to plug my iPhone into more than one computer, then open and play them in iTunes - as well as have the option to drag and drop the tunes to that Library.

    Again, there is no reason in principle why it can't be done. It is more to do with limiting file sharing, especially music files.
  • Allan Sampson Level 10 Level 10 (123,375 points)
    Copied from the link you provided.

    It's a question of syncing the two devices, then clicking through to the Apps tab in the iPhone and scrolling down to the "Files" section, from where you can drag and drop stuff to and from your main computer. As the name suggests, Apple's keeping a certain degree of control over this, *and you can't just dump files of any type willy-nilly--it's app driven.* For now it looks like only Mail is enabled, but it's certain that other apps, like Pages and whatnot, will get this power by the time the OS officially rolls out.


    I can do this now with PDF files. Dragging a PDF on my computer to Books under Library in the iTunes source list and after syncing my iPhone, the PDF will be available with the iBooks app.

    This is different from enabling disk mode with the iPhone. Disk mode is supported with the iPod since security is not a concern with the iPod.

    I would like to plug my iPhone into more than one computer, then open and play them in iTunes - as well as have the option to drag and drop the tunes to that Library.


    Not going to happen because the iPhone does not support disk mode. The only reason you can do this with an iPod is because disk mode is supported with an iPod.

    Again, there is no reason in principle why it can't be done. It is more to do with limiting file sharing, especially music files.


    Again, BALONEY. Since disk mode is supported with the iPod, why would file sharing become a concern with the iPhone all of a sudden? Once again, this has EVERYTHING to do with security concerns, which is not a concern with an iPod.
  • Geoff Wales Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Disk mode has always been possible, whether Apple supports it or not.

    "Wide Angle Software has released TouchCopy which enables Disk mode on your iPhone or iPod Touch so that you can use the unused storage on your iPhone or iPod Touch for file storage like a thumb to backup data or transfer between PCs or simply as an external hard drive.

    Wide Angle Software claim that to achieve this they do not modify the iPhone firmware nor does it need to jailbreak the iPhone as it simply communicates with your iPod or iPod Touch in the same way that iTunes does."
    http://www.iphonehacks.com/2007/11/iphonetouchcopy.html

    "iPhone Explorer is a free utility for Mac and Windows. It display an Explorer like window to show the iPhone’s inner with file folder structure similar to an USB drive.

    PhoneView offers a simple and intuitive interface to the core functions and includes the ability to free your audio and video content form iTunes by copying from the iPhone to another location on your local hard drive."

    This comment from the reviewer is pertinent:

    "In closing I can't help but wonder why it is Apple have not yet added native disk mode access to the iPhone."
    http://www.iphoniacs.com/news/iphone-software/iphone-disk-mode-_-2-easy-ways-200 805162004.htm

    Message was edited by: Geoff Wales
  • Allan Sampson Level 10 Level 10 (123,375 points)
    "In closing I can't help but wonder why it is Apple have not yet added native disk mode access to the iPhone."


    Once again - FOR SECURITY REASONS.

    Hacking an iPhone enables disk mode, which allows for downloading and installing unofficial software from unknown and untrusted sources. The only reports about malware with the iPhone have been with hacked/jailbroken iPhones with unofficial software downloaded from unknown and untrusted sources.

    Except for a photo and a PDF file, nothing can be installed from a received email with on a non-hacked iPhone that doesn't support disk mode. A photo can be saved to the Camera Roll only, and a PDF file can be saved to the iBooks app only. Nothing can be installed from a website with a non-hacked iPhone except for a photo, which can be saved to the Camera Roll only.

    You weren't right about having access to the iPhone's Photo Library, so keep going.
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