Previous 1 17 18 19 20 21 Next 477 Replies Latest reply: Jan 21, 2014 1:58 PM by darcy11072 Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • NYCSpencer Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi Canamuk and other posters,

    My name is Spencer Ante.I am an editor at the Wall Street Journal.

     

    If you would like to discuss your situation with me I would welcome it.

     

    I think you make some good suggestions for how to deal with this problem.

     

    best regards,

    Spencer

     

    <Email Edited by Host>

  • traefromon Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    well, evidently itunes/apple are not only aware of this issue, but do believe there's something wack about the whole process.

     

    why do i believe this? because they have graciously agreed to refund all $1,187 of it. no huge hoop jumping, just two emails, and boom.

     

    so, i hope anyone else who has run into this and hasn't tried for a refund, will now contact itunes.

     

    good luck!

  • pfsedita Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I read this entire thread tonight, in an effort to educate myself on the inapp purchase phenomenon. I didn't even know they existed until recently. I guess the apps I buy on my iphone/ipad/mac are not the ones that profit from selling $100 buckets of fake coins.

     

    That said, I got that ominous, large,  ITunes emailed invoice yesterday, 5 of them in a row. I discovered my son (12) was playing Brothers in Arms on his phone. This is a game we know about and allow him to play. As I read through all the pages of this thread I pulled up the app purchase page for Brothers In Arms. Unless I am blinded by the time of the morning, there is no statement anywhere warning about the possibility of inapp purchases. I have played the game the last hour or so to try to figure out how one gets to that point. The order page does have a list, in much smaller letters, down toward the bottom, of the top in app purchases.  But no warning like mentioned in posts above.

     

    With all that said, we probably won't try too hard to get a refund even though I think value for money is sadly lacking in such a situation. But...I didn't have the restrictions enabled so that is my bad. I did know they existed.

     

    I have a fairly bright kid who didn't want to spend his hard earned $150 on fake coins. After some thought, he figured out that is what he was doing. But in that moment, with that app blinking at you (or whatever it does) it is a bit much to expect a 12 year old to stop in his tracks.

     

    The app charged to my credit card but his hard earned cash came out of my very sad kid's little wallet. Lesson learned for him but still very sad for apple and a developer who sells a clearly overpriced product.

     

    yes...people buy overpriced cars and expensive clothes and overpriced is in the eye of the beholder but you could get a lot of folks to see the value in a Ferrari. I expect no one sees the value in a $100 bucket of virtual medals that vanish in mere minutes.

     

    Other parents, don't beat yourselves up. It is pretty silly to have someone say that giving a child an electronic device to play means you will watch what they do the entire time...please. At the risk of outing myself here, that's why I give the kid the device, so I can do something else for a bit. If I'm the only one to admit that I'll be shocked.

     

    But I do agree on the restrictions, mea culpa there and they are set firmly now. Just sad that we need them, that's all.

  • Djomy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    My son also made an in app purchase when i had my android tablet, one of the reasons i changed it for an ipad, in the android i couldnt even set a password, my only solution was to remove my google account from the devise. Anyway he spent 100 dollars on the smurfs app. now with the ipad we havent had any issues, i havent dissabled in app purchases because i sometimes use it, i do wish apple would change it so we had to input our password if any purchases are to b made even if concecutive purchases are being made.  Not long ago i was downloading free big fish games to try out and inadvertedly purchased a 6.99 game, before i realized it wasnt free it was already being installed. I was in a rush, leaving for the long weekend so i was clicking away and my finger pressed before my brain could process that it said 6.99 lol

     

    I personaly cant blame apple for the developers setting such ridiculous prices, a full, complete, no-restriction game shoulnt cost more than 20 dollars. I cant imagine spending a 100 to buy little virtual houses and decor, even the sims expantion packs are not that expensive.

     

    Anyway im a little sad to see some people here talking like they are the perfect parent or looking down at parents for letting their kids play unsupervised, my son is 2.5, he learned to unlock and play on my iphone before he could talk or walk, he has been using tablets since he was 1.5, this devices have awesome learning applications and if a game is made specificaly for kids why should we have to monitor every click, there are no small parts he can put in his mouth and the only button is the home button, so in my opinion its safer than most toys. In an ideal world everytime you buy something you would read the instructions including the fine print but, guess what, in this thread alone there are more people complaining about the issue because it has happened to them, and maybe 2-3 pointing fingers at the careless parents, so right there it shows that most apple users dont read the user guide. And this is just one of countless threads on this subject

     

    My point is that apple should listen to the masses and disable in app purchases from the get go, then let the ones that do purchases inable it on their own, im sorry but we are the minority it seems. And set the password for ANY purchase, a little extra security never hurt anybody.

  • alanfromwickford Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    i've not been caught out personally, partly due to luck and also info from this nd other forums.

     

    not everyone subscribes to forums, just a i don't take part in facebookor or twitter, deep down we like to trust others, especially regarding behaviour towards vulnerable youngsters.

     

    while adults might well play these games, and i feel it is their right to have adhoc in App purchasses, when it goes wrong we expect good behaviour from quality firms.. While Apple don't write these aps, they are the only conduit for apps on non jailbroken iphones and ipad's.

     

    Apple are rightly associated with very high quality product, and by default expected to have high standards and with it morals. i fail to see having attained that position they risk damaging this what is a fairly volotile regard.

     

    Apple might claim the cost of these devices place them firmly in the adult market, and having he need of a credit card  to make purchsses also indicates the age is 18 plus. This problem has been long running, once Pple were aware there is no further defence of ignorance, they could perhaps even stand accussed of knowingly aiding and abetting fraud/theft being so fully aware.

     

    it would take such a little step to stop all if not most of it by allowing owners to set a weekly limit or no further transaction without a password in their accounts settings.

     

    i don't subscribe to 'it's the perarants fault' brigade, we have the right to trust in Apple, had we bought a device from a dodgy market stall that would be different. A modern LED Tv is an expensive item yet kids are allowed to operate it by most perants, to order a pay per view it needs my password every time - simple's and effective is it not?.

  • bumpybutfun Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I had over $2800 in inadvertent in-app purchases back in November/December of 2011. The resolution should be easy enough through the Apple Support site (by going into your own account on the itunes store and clicking on the purchase to "report a problem"). I've read of many people getting refunds if they go through sending a request for refund for each and every purchase.

     

    I took a different route since I wasn't getting the desired response from Apple -- they definitely pushed back on it and told me how to disable in-app purchases to avoid future mishaps, but weren't indicating that they would be willing to refund the money.

     

    When I didn't get the immediate refund I had hoped for, I contacted my credit card company and disputed the charges -- I did tell the credit card co. that they were from my son gaining access to my account without my permission and making the purchases without my knowledge.

     

    They did what is called a "charge back"; and credited my account while taking the money back from Apple. Once I initiated this, Apple would only work with my credit card company, and after some time, Apple agreed that I did not have to pay for these charges.

     

    I did get a full refund. It was resolved within a 45-day time period....and the money was credited back immediately from the time of my phone call to my credit card co. The credit card company investigator told me that I can always request a refund and should be issued a refund from Apple for the simple reason of being "dissatisfied with my purchase"... either that the value of it wasn't worth it or I didn't like the app or the in-app purchases and found it lacking in entertainment value. That alone is reason enough to want and get a refund!

     

    I would suggest that you take the time to enter each charge and tell Apple that they were "unwanted purchases" and you would like a refund -- do this via the support website.

     

    I've heard more and more cases are now being resolved in this manner.

     

    If you can't get anywhere -- then call your credit card company and complain -- the major credit card companies have some awareness of the issue and have been working with iTunes and the various apps that  offer the option of in-app purchases targeted at young children.

     

    I've heard things like, Class Action Lawsuit bantered around -- in other words, you absolutely positively should get your money back, and if you're persistent enough about it, you will be successful.

     

    I went so far as to contact Pocket Gems, Inc., the makers of Tap Zoo and other apps where the charges were racked up by my son. Pocket Gems support agreed to work with Apple to issue a refund -- but since I'd already begun to work with my credit card company, Apple didn't even want to talk with me any more!

     

    Don't give up -- you'll get the refund eventually!

  • Daniel Stone2 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Wow...I feel much better now!  : )

     

    My nephew was playing "My Town 2" on my iPhone this morning and managed to purchase $175 worth of "coins" and "bucks"!!

     

    I didn't even know until my credit card company called me to ask about possible fraudulent purchases on my VISA card.


    I logged on to my VISA account and noticed all the charges.  I freaked out and instantly knew it was my nephew (since I did log him into my account to make a one-time $1.99 purchase...yes..I know..MY fault!!).

     

    Apple, though, was very quick to reply to my email and I'm being refunded the entire amount.  I spoke with someone from Apple about the issue (on the phone...I called the Apple Store in a panic) and he admitted that in-app purchases are a big problem right now.

     

    A person really shouldn't be allowed to make so many purchases in a row without being prompted for the password at some point?

     

    Still, I'm impressed that Apple was so easy to deal with.

  • markas214 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I just got hit with over $400 in charges for my two week old IPad. My 6 year old said "it's not real money Dad".

     

    Now Let me say I do not need to hear opinionated people with way too much time in their hands scold me. The parents posting here know that they made a mistake. While it may make you feel somehow superior posting how dumb you believe we all are in reality you are very insecure and need to find a better way to increase your sense of self worth. We get it that you are miserable and have few friends so can spend your day online posting useless drivel.

     

    I have had PCs and  laptops for nearly twenty years. I recently entered the Apple world and this is not a great way to start. My boy is very bright and I allow him to play children's games unsupervised (Oh my!) as he knows right from wrong and always asks if he can make a purchase in his games like Wizard 101. In those games there are more steps involved in a purchase and the fact you are paying is always evident as your credit card, billing info must be entered each time. Anyone who doesn't believe having $149.99 purchase options for virtual berries in kids game is meant to scam an unsuspecting parent user is very shy of common sense and ignorant of how the greedy of the world work.

     

    Now I did get to talk to a rep today and he instructed me on how to get refunded. I will never be in this position again but it obviously is a dirty way to do business and I hope Apple sees how bad it makes the company look to be associated with these types of App developers.

     

    I just thought I'd share my experience and will try to update this post but as I actually have a life and am a busy man with no time to post multiple times in a day, check back to see who I offended and then feel all high and mighty I doubt I will get back on here soon.

     

    Cheers

  • iinami Level 4 Level 4 (1,405 points)

    markas214 wrote:

     

    I just got hit with over $400 in charges for my two week old IPad. My 6 year old said "it's not real money Dad".

     

    Now Let me say I do not need to hear opinionated people with way too much time in their hands scold me. The parents posting here know that they made a mistake. While it may make you feel somehow superior posting how dumb you believe we all are in reality you are very insecure and need to find a better way to increase your sense of self worth. We get it that you are miserable and have few friends so can spend your day online posting useless drivel.

     

    I have had PCs and  laptops for nearly twenty years. I recently entered the Apple world and this is not a great way to start. My boy is very bright and I allow him to play children's games unsupervised (Oh my!) as he knows right from wrong

     

     

    I just thought I'd share my experience and will try to update this post but as I actually have a life and am a busy man with no time to post multiple times in a day, check back to see who I offended and then feel all high and mighty I doubt I will get back on here soon.

     

    Cheers

    let me see if i understand you correctly: you come on here telling people not to post stuff in response that offends you, but yet it's okay for you to offend everyone else? and your son is very bright yet but says it's not real money?

  • Djomy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I'm totally against insulting but telling a parent his kid is not bright just because he doesnt know a wagon of berries cost real money, specially in a game were there is "game cash"/"berries"/"tokens", the kid is playing along and earning this said cash by completing tasks in the game, he presses a button that tells him he can get 150 with just a click. Thinking its just part of the game, a way to earn more game cash doesnt make him any less bright. Please dont insult the kids, even the smatest kid's knowledge is limited and every parent sees their kid as bright, thats love for our children and no one has the right to make us belive any less.

  • alanfromwickford Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    a childs awareness as a measure of intellegence or upbringing is very flawed, so that pointless argument apart, the wrong of this type of selling as i see it follows -:

     

    example 1

    you have an amount of cash kept out of normal site say in a bedroom drawer, you child requires some money and you trust your child to go and get lets say £5, not take more than allowed or help thememselves later without asking.

     

    the principle is trust for THIS IS A ONCE ONLY TRANSACTION WITH YOUR PERMISSION.

     

    i.e. You would not expect that child as a person you fully trust to hence forth help themselves as they please, without asking you 1st.

     

    Examle 2.

    you have some money held your vehicle, you freind sells you a small item which you fund from your 'pot'. You would not expect them to supply more items on the assumption you have bought before.

     

    Credit Card companies hold very sensative information, completing a transaction can be for very large amounts, the initial transaction may be for £0.99 but the trader can then draw many hundreds of pounds before you are aware.

     

    But just ring up and ask any simple question and your subgected to a barrage of mindless data protection act privacy questions. Yet making a single credit card transaction to any trader, allows that trader to later draw more money unhindered from your card and as they see fit. Had someone taken money without prior permission, be prosecuted and offerred the excuse 'it was for the victim to buy a bowl of green cornflakes' as a defence, well i ask you?

     

    it is this afrontary to your trust you have should expected from or any trusted relation or freind is what causes the angst, and also in complete innocence you don't expect anyone would dare help them selelves having been so trusted, face on and doscovered uyou'd likely punch their lights out.

     

    In the UK law has was changed to some degree to reduce this problem, in that if you tell your credit card company to make no more payments to that vendor then the card company has to stop those payments - but you must tell them and only from that time are you protected.

     

    Trouble is, partly due to Apples slow advising of transactions, you are often well down before you realise. While i do see the point that many do not want 'nannying', given the target market is the young, used blatently as a ruse to gaining payment from the 'responsible so financing adult', i think it should be illigal to draw additional payments from any card without further password.

     

    i personally dislike it when insurrance companies put me as a default on auto-renew, they claim it prevents me going accidentally un-insurred, but it is well known it's best to shop arround. I saved £180 on a motor bike policy offering far better cover as example,

     

    I make it very clear i do not want auto renue every time i buy any service on any card.

     

    For those who do not care for that restriction thats fine, a direct debit access should be allowed, for this would be i think as close at it could be, to appease all.

     

    Alan

  • swallowsrest Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    TONEFOX - Stupid!!! You need to take a reality check!! Of course its a scam.

  • tonefox Level 6 Level 6 (8,780 points)

    You registered today to make this valuable contribution to a thread that's been dead for three months?  Find yourself a hobby.

  • stevejobsfan0123 Level 8 Level 8 (37,205 points)

    Find yourself a hobby.

    He did: trolling.

  • mdcallag Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Wife installed Tap Zoo for my 6 year old daughter. Thanks to password caching on the iphone my daughter made 6 purchases for $99.99 each. Great way to do business.

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