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Is this Mac color classic dead, been in attic for 14 years.

4447 Views 7 Replies Latest reply: Nov 15, 2010 6:23 PM by Martin Stevens RSS
Ron Apra Calculating status...
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Oct 6, 2010 4:51 PM
I discovered a mac color classic that has been in an attic for at least 14 years. The case is in pristine condition, no keyboard but has a trac ball mouse. I turned it on an it made a sound like a power supply charging up. There is nothing on the screen. Do you need the keyboard to turn it on? Googling says it takes a apple keyboard II (MO487). Is there a battery on the motherboard? Thanks for any info you can provide me.

Ron
macpro, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,110 points)
    The rocker switch on most of those old unibody Macs is a service switch. It must be on for the unit to operate, but does not start it up. The other term used is "soft power". You need the power key on the keyboard to fire it up. Any adb keyboard will work. The key in question has a left-pointed triangle Icon.

    I turned it on an it made a sound like a power supply charging up.


    That's Good. That's the sound of a working unibody Mac power supply.

    Is there a battery on the motherboard?


    There is a PRAM backup battery. It is likely to be 1/2 AA sized, and must be 3.6 Volts new, 3.2 Volts or better to work. A 3.0 Volt camera battery will not suffice.
    Beige G3, G4/867, G4/dual 1.25 MDD, MacPro'09, Mac OS 8.6 or Earlier, and 9.2, 10.5 and Server - LW IIg, LW 4/600, ATalk ImageWriter LQ
  • Ralph Landry1 Level 7 Level 7 (28,815 points)
    I resurrected my old PM 7600 a few weeks ago after five years in the basement, boxed. Replacing the PRAM battery is essential. I found the battery at Radio Shack for something like $10...pricey but the voltage has to very close to 3.6v as Grant says. Good luck getting the machine working...surprising how well and how long they will function.
    iMac G5 17, Mac OS X (10.4.11), iPad (3.2.2); PM 7600/132+G4/450 (Mac OS 9.1)
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,110 points)
    If it is like most of the other unibody Macs, you need to remove the two Torx screws deep inside the top handle. I think there must be at least two more. They can also be removed with the proper Torx driver, or fudged with a near-fitting American-sized Allen (hexagon) driver, as they are only into plastic.

    The two case halves are press-fit together (not a hydraulic-press tight -- the screws draw them together). The challenge is to coax them apart without gouging the plastic. Don't even think about using a screwdriver -- it will definitely gouge the plastic. Aftermarket vendors used to supply a 3 inch wide Bulldog clamp to insert in the crack between the halves and squeeze open. A wide putty knife may be useful, but go easy.

    The extremely delicate neck of the CRT must be treated with special care. There is a slender capillary tube there, used to remove the last traces of gas from the tube. Break that off while pulling at connectors and your CRT is instantly landfill.

    Also, it is possible for the CRT to store over 10,000 Volts for decades. The CRT bottle itself, the Big Red Wire, and the Flyback transformer may store this Voltage. Connect that through your Heart, (e.g., Hand-to-Hand) and it can literally stop your heart.
    Beige G3, G4/867, G4/dual 1.25 MDD, MacPro'09, Mac OS 8.6 or Earlier, and 9.2, 10.5 and Server - LW IIg, LW 4/600, ATalk ImageWriter LQ
  • Martin Stevens Calculating status...
    MacBook Pro 2.4GHz, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Colour Classic, Cube, Mac Mini G4, MacBook Pro

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