Previous 1 2 Next 29 Replies Latest reply: Nov 7, 2014 9:34 AM by David Kelly1 Go to original post
  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,715 points)
    noisymime wrote:
    . . .
    Sorry it probably was Setup Assistant. Whatever the one that is part of the OSX installer process is. ie I didn't create a user and then copy things over.


    Ah, good. The other way can cause some problems.

    Interestingly, when I reinstalled I did it onto a case INsensitive filesystem and things still seem to have gone fine with the migration.


    Great!
  • Yeehat Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    I hope I can ask for a little clarification here, without opening a new discussion. I've searched through discussions and Pondini's TM FAQ and troubleshooting, but I'm still uncertain about it.

    My MBP came with a case-insensitive format and it was ok for me. I began backing up with TM to TC I purchased along with MBP. Only several weeks later I realized that TC's volume format was case-sensitive. I used only Airport Utility to setup TC and was never asked about the case-(in)sensitive option. I'm now wondering: should I need to restore my whole system from TM backup, I'd have first to reformat my internal drive to case-sensitive?

    Should this be the case, I think it would be a better choice to erase my TM backup, reformat TC volume with Disk Utility to case-insensitive and start anew. Am I wrong?

    Thanks in advance.
  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,715 points)
    Yeehat wrote:
    I hope I can ask for a little clarification here, without opening a new discussion. I've searched through discussions and Pondini's TM FAQ and troubleshooting, but I'm still uncertain about it.

    My MBP came with a case-insensitive format and it was ok for me.


    Yes, that's the default, and much preferred. OSX and many apps don't like case-sensitive file systems, and very few Macs use them.

    I began backing up with TM to TC I purchased along with MBP. Only several weeks later I realized that TC's volume format was case-sensitive.


    Yes, that's also the default, and is not a major problem.

    should I need to restore my whole system from TM backup, I'd have first to reformat my internal drive to case-sensitive?


    No. This thread is about restoring the backup of a system that was case-sensitive.

    Should this be the case, I think it would be a better choice to erase my TM backup, reformat TC volume with Disk Utility to case-insensitive and start anew. Am I wrong?


    Your setup is the default, and will not be a problem if you do a full system restore. The only problem will occur in this scenario:

    1. You create and back up a file named MYFILE.
    2. You change that name to MyFile.
    3. You try to restore MYFILE from the backup, to the original location (via the "Star Wars" display).

    Since you're on a case-ignorant file system, both those files can't exist in the same folder, but instead of replacing MyFile, OSX will give you this message:
    |



    |

    If there's only one file involved, you know what's happening and can take the appropriate action (probably delete MyFile and do the restore of MYFILE again; or restore MYFILE to an alternate location).

    But if you're restoring a folder with a lot of files (and perhaps sub-folders), you don't get a list of items, so you don't know how many files are a problem, much less their names.

    I wouldn't worry about it. But if you want to erase the TC and start over, see #A8 in [Time Machine - Troubleshooting|http://web.me.com/pondini/Time_Machine/Troubleshooting.html] (or use the link in *User Tips* at the top of this forum), for instructions on changing the case-sensitivity of the new sparse bundle.
  • Yeehat Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    Huge thanks, Pondini. You couldn't have made it clearer
  • TomRS75 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Unbelievable! I have the same problem. I think many people who is coming from the UNIX world will use case-sensitive filesystem..
    How come this restore functionally in the case-sensitive mode is failing. no test was made by apple?
    (probably the test engineer had to work on the iPhone... )
    BTW this is only affects Snow Leopard, since previously I successfully used time machine with leopard with case-sensitive system disk.

    Anyway a solution: (and big thanks for the author):

    http://jcs.org/notaweblog/2009/11/11/restoringcase-sensitive_hfs_volumes_with_timemachine/
  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,715 points)
    TomRS75 wrote:
    Unbelievable! I have the same problem. I think many people who is coming from the UNIX world will use case-sensitive filesystem..


    Be very careful before you do that. OSX, and Apple apps generally, don't particularly like case-sensitive file systems. A number of 3rd-party apps won't even install on one.

    BTW this is only affects Snow Leopard, since previously I successfully used time machine with leopard with case-sensitive system disk.


    Were you able to do a full system restore?
  • TomRS75 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Earlier on 10.5 (Leopard ) I did successful restore. Now I am doing the rsync way, since Leopard Install DVD cannot be used to restore a Snow Leopard machine, and Time Machine Restore on the Snow Leopard Install DVD is broken.. The best solution from Apple would be a Time Machine Restore CD or something similar, with the updated version of Restore program. Otherwise we need to buy a new Snow Leopard DVD...

    The rsync is running at the moment so, I hope it will complete soon..

    Yeah Ad0be and M$oft the most famous ones whom do not support case sensitive filesystem... at least the Office can be used easily, with some simple tricks..

    on the other hand to compile a linux kernel, or to use a fully functional perl for example, I need case sensitive file system...( or simply to make the hackers and other bad guys life harder.. and apparently mine )

    Message was edited by: TomRS75
  • TomRS75 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    update: all up and running correctly.. using rsync
  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,715 points)
    Cool.

    Be sure to file a Bug Report. See [Reporting a Problem to Apple|http://web.me.com/pondini/AppleTips/BugReport.html].
  • eskhool Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    This'll make this thread more interesting:
    I have a case sensitive FS (huge mistake, since most major apps have hiccups or just refuse to work with it)...
    I was trying to use the Time Machine backup to restore onto a case INsensitive partition that I had formatted as regular case Insensitive HFSX journaled.

    However, when I restore from the backup, it always reformats it to a case SENSITIVE partition and does a too perfect restore.

    I know my requirement it the exact opposite of what the original thread was but its very related so ... since it works exactly as it should for me...maybe something I'm doing and what the original poster is doing needs be swapped so we can meet each others requirements

    My setup: Time Machine backup is onto an Ubuntu Network Setup (works perfectly) and I have the latest snow leopard 10.6.6. installed and running the snow leopard installer with time machine restore from the utilities.
  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,715 points)
    eskhool wrote:
    . . .
    I have a case sensitive FS (huge mistake, since most major apps have hiccups or just refuse to work with it)...
    I was trying to use the Time Machine backup to restore onto a case INsensitive partition that I had formatted as regular case Insensitive HFSX journaled.


    Instead of doing a full restore, try erasing/reformatting the partition and installing OSX. When your Mac starts up, try using +Setup Assistant+ to transfer your stuff, per #19 in [Time Machine - Frequently Asked Questions|http://web.me.com/pondini/Time_Machine/FAQ.html] (or use the link in *User Tips* at the top of this forum).

    I don't know if that will work (I've never tried it), but it may.

    Let us know.
  • shiretu Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Hello all,

    I had exactly the same issue today. But instead of using rsync, I came up with a new more "apple-centric" approach: get rid of the offending files from the backup and than let the nature take its course. Here is how I did it.

    First, unfortunately, you need a second mac computer. Lucky me, I had one.
    The problem is to trick the TC to "bind" to the backup from the second mac and use time machine app to properly delete the faulty files (that list which is shown by the starter of this thread) and naturally do a nice restore on the target machine.

    good_backup.sparsebundle - the complete backup that we want to fix
    temp_backup.sparsebundle - a temporary backup which is totally discardable in the end

    1. power up the second mac and start doing a fresh new full backup. Once started, a new temp_backup.sparsebundle should pop up. When that happens, you can stop the backup. We only need the metadata.
    2. Right click on temp_backup.sparsebundle and "Show Package Contents"
    3. Copy com.apple.TimeMachine.MachineID.plist and Info.plist files from temp_backup.sparsebundle to
    good_backup.sparsebundle but MAKE A COPY FIRST/___sbsstatic___/migration-images/migration-img-not-avail.png/___sbsstatic ___/migration-images/migration-img-not-avail.png/___sbsstatic___/migration-image s/migration-img-not-avail.png. We need those files back in the end
    4. Unmount everything, delete temp_backup.sparsebundle and start time machine. At this stage, you can safely "bind" to good_backup.sparsebundle by starting time machine.
    5. Show all the hidden files and folders by following this steps:
    http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/3104/os-x-show-hidden-files-and-folders-in-mac-os -x-finder/
    6. Start time machine application and navigate where those files are
    7. Delete them properly by using the gear button inside time machine app
    8. Exit and restore the original com.apple.TimeMachine.MachineID.plist and Info.plist
    9. Start the normal restore on the target computer

    This technique can be used for other files as well. Instead of deleting them, you can also make a local copy and after final restore is complete you can put them back, obviously, with a different name

    Cheers,
    Andrei

    Message was edited by: shiretu
  • thecros Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I had a similar problem. Here is my fix.

     

    There were about eight files with case sensitive names (most of them xxx.3ssl.gz files in the man3 folder and one mailbox file) I went into time machine on another boot volume and deleted the case sensitive duplicates and then was able to restore from my backup.

     

    Root was still messed up when I restarted so I opened the workgroup manager, selected my root account (show system accounts), and then switched it to not use open directory. I then restarted, went back to workgroup manager and switched it back to open directory and typed a new password. Has worked fine so far.

     

    When I restored I restored to 10.6.7 so now it's time to (after I run a TM backup on my newly reformatted NON case sensitive drive and clone the working system to my new clone drive) re upgrade to 10.6.8 and see if I need to try the Open Directory trick again, or if things will just work.

     

    Saved a bunch of money and time (unless you take into account that I could have brought this all in a week ago and they MIGHT have figured it out by now).

    What is time machine fatal error -8089What is time machine fatal error -8089What is time machine fatal error -8089

  • m0xee Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I want to use Time Machine from the SL 10.6 DVD to recover my case-sensitive system because it's much easier than the rest of the work-arounds, and I paid for such a solution.  As far as I recall, the relationship between Apple and myself is based on money in exchange for goods.  Since the goods on the 10.6.0 DVD are bugged, I want this fixed without any further effort on my part, so I can go forward with my TM recovery just as easily as I intended when I bought the DVD.  Apple has wasted my time, which is money, and I am not happy!  I want this fixed ASAP!

  • David Kelly1 Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)

    Did you format your internal HD to be case-sensitive? If not, that's the reason.

     

    When you do a full system restore, the first thing that Time Machine does is to erase the destination volume -- it does not change the format.

    That was the magic information I was looking for before undertaking my conversion of case-senesitive to case-insensitive this weekend!

     

    However I'm seriously considering a virgin install of Mavericks and attempting a Migration Assistant merge from my Yosemite image on Time Machine hosted by Yosemite Server. A couple of apps don't Yosemite, and Yosemite Mail.app is a stinker.

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