13 Replies Latest reply: Jul 24, 2014 10:17 AM by vazandrew
rab_random Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Will the apple TV actually display on a standard definition TV?
Obviously I plan to use a converter to go from HDMI to SCART/Composite.

Custom Build, Windows 7
  • Chenks Level 5 Level 5 (7,420 points)
    rab_random wrote:
    Will the apple TV actually display on a standard definition TV?
    Obviously I plan to use a converter to go from HDMI to SCART/Composite.


    i would advise not doing that.
    the appletv only supports 720p, and your SD tv will not be capable of displaying that.
  • rab_random Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Fair point but the reason I ask is because my blu ray player works on my SD tv with a converter. This is why I don't assume?
  • Chenks Level 5 Level 5 (7,420 points)
    rab_random wrote:
    Fair point but the reason I ask is because my blu ray player works on my SD tv with a converter. This is why I don't assume?


    would you not be better investing in an HD TV rather than putting all your HD devices thru a convertor (that may or may not work with the appletv) ?
  • tgibbs Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    It is not officially supported by Apple, but some people on the forum have reported success with this approach. The converter must be a real D-to-A converter; simple cable adapters don't work. You might want to see if the Apple Store will let your return it without a restocking charge if it doesn't work with your converter/TV.
  • newagemac Level 2 Level 2 (240 points)
    Actually after the update the Apple TV does now support 480p output. So it is possible.
  • Chenks Level 5 Level 5 (7,420 points)
    newagemac wrote:
    Actually after the update the Apple TV does now support 480p output. So it is possible.


    via HDMI. any other connection method has to deemed not supported and as such no guarantee it will work.
  • dsolowan Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I haven't been able to find a connecting cable between the HDMI output of Apple TV and either composite video or S-video connector on an older TV. I know the video quality will suffer, but just want to be able to test the system. When RadioShack doesn't have it, I don't know where to go.

    Any suggestions?
  • rab_random Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I went into my local Apple stockist today and they referred me right back here to see if I can find someone who has tried it. They had one in the shop and he cracked out the remote to have a look in the settings. There was nothing there to reduce the video to 480i but that still doesn't rule it5 out for me...
  • tgibbs Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    You're pretty much out of luck, unless you want to spend a substantial amount of money. Apple TV outputs only digital, and your TV accepts only analog, so you'd need a digital-to-analog converter in between. D-to-A converters are available, but they are not cheap, and if you are going to spend that much money, it would probably make more sense to invest it in a HD set that has a digital HDMI input.

    If you are determined to keep your old TV, or you don't want to spend much more money, the new Apple TV is not for you. Depending upon what you want to achieve, there are some other options. If you are mainly interested in renting shows or watching Netflix, then get the low-end ($60) Roku box (you'll be renting from Amazon, rather than Apple, however). If you are mainly interested in streaming your media from other Apple devices, look around for a good deal on the old model Apple TV. There are other streaming alternatives as well (Western Digital makes a box), but they won't interface as well with Apple computers.
  • jcalchi Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)
    I'm not married to the TV, just the cabinet it's in! It's an early 2000's 32" Sony SD CRT that weighs about 200#. Before this TV, I had a really old JVC. It only had the typical coax connection on the back. When I bought a DVD player rather than using a converter, etc. that left the movies letterboxed, I experimented and ran the cables (yellow, red and white) out of the DVD player into an old VCR that then connected to the TV. Not only did it work, the video was no longer in letterbox. No idea why / how it worked. Would this same trick work if I ran the ATV HDMI to my Charter DVR that does have HDMI? I threw out the VCR a few years ago when the JVC was replaced with the Sony.
  • tgibbs Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    jcalchi wrote:
    I'm not married to the TV, just the cabinet it's in! It's an early 2000's 32" Sony SD CRT that weighs about 200#. Before this TV, I had a really old JVC. It only had the typical coax connection on the back. When I bought a DVD player rather than using a converter, etc. that left the movies letterboxed, I experimented and ran the cables (yellow, red and white) out of the DVD player into an old VCR that then connected to the TV. Not only did it work, the video was no longer in letterbox. No idea why / how it worked. Would this same trick work if I ran the ATV HDMI to my Charter DVR that does have HDMI? I threw out the VCR a few years ago when the JVC was replaced with the Sony.


    Maybe, but I wouldn't count on it. The HDMI standard is complicated, and involves copy protection handshaking and encryption. People have been reporting mixed results with adapters.
  • jessomadic Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

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  • vazandrew Level 6 Level 6 (16,405 points)

    There still would be no guarantee, you would be unable to view protected content, have issues with resolution/aspect ratio, and functionality could ease at anytime.