3 Replies Latest reply: Dec 28, 2010 8:34 PM by ed2345
bclark1914 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Forgive what may be a novice question, but whats the upside?

Dell, Windows 7
  • ed2345 Level 7 Level 7 (22,140 points)
    The main upside is when you have a file in a more bulky format, such as WAV, and need a compressed version.

    However, iTunes lets you do a "create AAC version" no matter what you are starting with (providing it is unprotected).
  • tb344 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Same topic, different question. I am getting very frustrated with the way itunes imports music. I am chnging over from a Zune (which I used to rip all of my very large CD collection), and trying to import those songs into iTunes. It imports most, but not all and converts most songs to ACC format, which has taken days so far. The problem is, because I have so much music, my system has crashed a few times, and I have had to reupload my folders. Every time I do so, it makes multiple copies of each song in the iTunes folder and essentially doubles/triples the initial required storage space that my songs originally took up on my drive. So now, I have to upload batches at a time. What is making me mad is that half my music is converted and saved as new files in the iTunes folder while the other half stays in their original folders and don't get converted. This creates a nightmare for me as I want to have all my music in one directory without having a separate folder for one band in both iTunes and my original folder. Is there an easier way to do this?
  • ed2345 Level 7 Level 7 (22,140 points)
    iTunes does not convert songs when they are added to the library. The only exception is when you start with WMA files, which iTunes converts to the format you have indicated in Preferences, which is AAC in your case. For all other files, iTunes adds them in the same format they are already in.

    Apparently you had your music in WMA format, which is common for Zune users but is not a wise choice. Please memorize these three words: EM PEE THREE. If you keep your music in MP3 format it can be used in virtually every player, program and device *without further conversion.*