6 Replies Latest reply: Jan 4, 2011 2:40 PM by bordsenius
Joseph Coates Level 1 Level 1
expertise.iphone
iPhone
Does anyone know how to set up a Filter in Aperture 3.1.1 so that one can see a list (or make a list) of the most to least common focal length one shoots at with interchangeable lenses?

I assume it will probably have to be a search for all 20mm, then all 28mm, then all 35mm, then all 50mm, etc. and then look at the totals for each, penciled down, and see what focal lengths are the most and least used.

I have set up separate camera smart folders so I would need to only conduct this search/filter on the two DSLR bodies I have. Otherwise, a Nikon scanner, Minolta scanner, and a G10 and some other point and shoots will come in to the mix and make it inaccurate.

My objective is to see which lenses are redundant and which are less used then sell the extras.

iMac 27 inch 2.66 Ghz Intel Core i5, Mac OS X (10.6.5)
  • Frank Caggiano Level 7 Level 7
    Setup a smart filter that selects the camera(s) you're interested in and then go into the list view of the Browser and sort on either focal length.

    Then select the first image using a particular focal length, scroll down until you reach the last image using that length and shift click it. All the images between the first and last will be selected. At the bottom of the list view window it will say how many images are selected this will be the count of how often you used that focal length.
  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6
    Joseph Coates wrote:
    My objective is to see which lenses are redundant and which are less used then sell the extras.


    Seems you should filter by lens and not by focal length.

    Smart Settings: 70-400mm F40-56 SSM (Sony G)

    I keep a permanent set of Smart Albums, one for each lens I have. (Create one, then dupe it and change the Lens field and the Album name. Get the lens name from the metadata of a shot taken with the lens.) Periodically I check the totals to see my usage pattern.

    Aperture

    I recommend also setting up a series of Smart Albums for focal length. (As above, create one, then dupe and change the filter field and Album name. Group them in one Folder.) If you use cameras with different size sensors, you might want to set up both an actual focal length set, and a "35mm equivalent focal length" set. Use whatever ranges you find meaningful.

    Note that you can select any number of Folders to open all of them in the Browser and get a total number of images. Note that this number will change as you expand or collapse Stacks, and so the totals given depend somewhat on how you use Stacks. Note, too, that Smart Albums use very little overhead (the only thing stored are the criteria). Don't hesitate to make as many as you find useful.

    Message was edited by: Kirby Krieger, added illustrations.
  • bordsenius Level 1 Level 1
    Sorry if my answer is out of place here, as it requires an additional piece of software.

    The data you want is not available in aperture for the time being, but maccreate offers a $9.99 app that does this and a whole lot more when it comes to statistics on your aperture library.

    You can break it don into lenses, cameras, Aperture, iso, focal length etc. and within customizable dates as well. So if yo uare into statistics ans Aperture, check it out.

    The url is:
    http://shop.maccreate.com/products/Aperture-Inspector-1.0-%252d-Find-Out-More-Ab out-Your-Photography.html
  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6
    bordsenius wrote:
    Sorry if my answer is out of place here, as it requires an additional piece of software.
    ...
    The url is:
    http://shop.maccreate.com/products/Aperture-Inspector-1.0-%252d-Find-Out-More-Ab out-Your-Photography.html


    Not at all. Spot on, useful, and imho (if it works as advertised) worth the cost.

    Thanks for the pointer.
  • Joseph Coates Level 1 Level 1
    expertise.iphone
    iPhone
    I found a free stand alone app called PhotoStats

    http://www.nillis.com/photostats/

    But, it crashed. Either it did not work on latest OS or, I gave it too much to chew on right off. I'll give it a try later.
  • bordsenius Level 1 Level 1
    I had a look at Photostats, I did not know about that one. One problem: I have all my pictures in the aperture library, and it would not scan my library. You'll probably need to have the files stored outside the library.

    Aperture Inspector reads the aperture database, and in that way it uses the data that has already been processed by Aperture. So it does not matter how things are organized.

    But one is free, and the other one is almost free, so I'll use both. My average lens costs more than $1100, so if they can save me from buying one I do not need it is a bargain. And I'm a bit of a statistics freak as well..