6 Replies Latest reply: Jan 24, 2011 4:04 PM by Grant Bennet-Alder
jedoralive Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
I have 7 questions on SSD's.

1 - When can we expect 1TB size?
2 - How much will it cost?
3 - Can I replace an internal sata with an SSD or do I need a new computer?
4 - Is an SSD compatible with BootCamp (can I install a copy of windows onto it)?
5 - If I can, will it have the same speed results as the OSX side?
6 - If my OS is an SSD but my files are on a separate internal SATA volume, will that slow my performance working in an application?
7 - How fail-safe are SSD's? They seem expensive so far and I wouldn't want to get into a habit of paying that much for drives that aren't at LEAST at stable as SATA drives which are already not that great.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Mac Pro Tower, Mac OS X (10.6.6), 1,1
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (257,755 points)
    1. Who knows?
    2. Who knows?
    3. SSDs can be used in place of HDDs.
    4. Yes.
    5. Benchmark it and then you'll know.
    6. Probably.
    7. See the following:

    The SSD Anthology- Understanding SSDs and New Drives from OCZ - AnandTech -- Your Source for Hardwar….
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 9 Level 9 (53,085 points)
    6. If my OS is an SSD but my files are on a separate internal SATA volume, will that slow my performance working in an application?

    Moving the User Home Directories off the Boot drive to a separate Hard Drive is one of the BEST speed-Ups you can give your Mac Pro. It relieves competition for the Boot drive, which is left handling System + Library + Applications + Paging.

    If you are thinking about an SSD for a Boot Drive, think small and fast. The one I use is 30GB (but I do not have Windows installed).

    This article can show you how to move the User Accounts, without having to use Terminal or cloning programs:

    http://chris.pirillo.com/how-to-move-the-home-folder-in-os-x-and-why/

    7. SSDs are thought to be long lasting, but we really don't know yet what happens when they get old.

    "Any Drive can fail at any time."
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 9 Level 9 (53,085 points)
    3. Many SSD are 2.5 inch form factor. Mounting them on standard Mac Pro drive sleds is not straightforward. There are several approaches, in no particular order:

    • Mount in the lower Optical Drive bay using a SATA cable and Molex-to-SATA power cable (for 2008 and earlier) or just plugging in (for models already equipped with standard SATA Optical drive cables, which includes 2009 and later). Since the drive has no spinning motors, mounting brackets are optional.

    • Mount in an Icy Dock 2.5 drive to 3.5 sled adapter, like this one from OWC/MacSales, US$20:

    http://eshop.macsales.com/item/IcyDock/MB882SP1S2B/

    • Buy a replacement Mac Pro sled that accepts either 2.5 or 3.5 drives, such as these from Trans International, about US$39 depending on exact MacPro model:

    http://www.transintl.com/store/category.cfm?category=2787

    • remove the stamped sheet metal can from the SSD and install just the "guts" by pressing onto the SATA backplane connector, cost: free.

    • Attach to the Mac Pro sled with Duct Tape. (This approach only works if you have not already used up all your Duct Tape fixing your sneakers.)
  • Smokerz Level 6 Level 6 (9,410 points)
    "Can I replace an internal sata with an SSD or do I need a new computer?" I have 3 SSD in my 2008 Mac Pro. 2 in a Nexstar SE 5.25 enclosure which is $17.00 and easy to place in the lower bay optical compartment. It holds one or two SSD or 2.5 inch drives. Gives a really nice blue light tinge to the Mac Pro. I have another in Bay 2 sata internal, I secure it with a pull tie plastic strap, no big deal.

    " If I can, will it have the same speed results as the OSX side?" you need to do some performance research, try here first. You have to be joking with this question, just kidding. http://www.anandtech.com/show/3618/intel-x25v-in-raid0-faster-than-x25m-g2-for-2 50

    SSD drives are highly addicting. They will spoil you and you'll not want to go back to standard hard drives.

    "How fail-safe are SSD's?' If you worry about that you just might have to give up computing. See the other posts and run a scratch drive along with the SSD. I keep ALL large file copies, additions or deletions off my SSD and on to my scratch drive. A seagate 1.5 T sata hard drive.
  • jedoralive Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Does it slow performance to filter through any of these?
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 9 Level 9 (53,085 points)
    I think you are asking specifically about the Icy Dock. It does not have any active components, so it cannot slow anything down.

    In fact, none of the solutions I mentioned have any added active components -- except of course the duct tape, which, if you leave any sticky part exposed has a tendency to attract stray bits that are shifted off the ends of numeric quantities while rounding. But this does not slow anything down.