14 Replies Latest reply: Feb 8, 2011 11:01 PM by vja4Him
vja4Him Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Somebody has hacked our Internet connection and downloaded illegal files. I'm looking for Anti-Virus software to use with my MacPro.

I've already called our ISP (Charter). They told me there is nothing they can do, since I use my own router. I called D-Links, and they helped to set up a secure connection. I asked them about setting up a second level of security (recommended by Charter), but they told me I didn't need that, and refused to help me with the MAC ID Filtering (recommended by Charter).

I called Apple Tech Support and they helped me to adjust some other settings (Firewall on, Sharing Files off).

I just want to have the maximum security to hopefully stop whoever is hacking and downloading illegal files ...

MacPro 2.93GHz, Mac OS X (10.6.6), 8GB RAM
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,680 points)
    You are not have a virus problem. The anti-virus software will not help you.

    I would suggest that you turn on the firewall in your router.

    Are you using any of the clients for P2P file transfers. These will use your computer as a server to share files to other users.

    ___________________

    Allan
    tiger

    ___________________
  • vja4Him Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    The Apple Tech helped me with the Firewall settings. It is turned on and set to the most secure.

    I have no idea what clients for P2P file transfer is ...

    How do I set that up .... ???
  • varjak paw Level 10 Level 10 (169,830 points)
    Mac OS X does not include any P2P client. You will need to determine which P2P network you wish to connect, then search for an appropriate application. One of the compendiums such as MacUpdate is a good place to look for apps and read reviews.

    Regards.
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,680 points)
    Some of the P2P clients for Mac are uTorrent, Transmission, BitTorrent, Vuse or Limewire. Any of those can be using your Mac as a server which will leave strange files laying around your Mac.

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    |___________________

    Allan
    tiger

    ___________________
  • KJK555 Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)
    They probably "borrowed" your wireless connection.
  • vja4Him Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    {quote:title=Dave Sawyer wrote:}
    Mac OS X does not include any P2P client. You will need to determine which P2P network you wish to connect, then search for an appropriate application. One of the compendiums such as MacUpdate is a good place to look for apps and read reviews.

    Regards.

    Mac OS X does not include any P2P client. You will need to determine which P2P network you wish to connect, then search for an appropriate application. One of the compendiums such as MacUpdate is a good place to look for apps and read reviews.

    Regards. {quote}

    I really don't understand P2P, and how that would help me ...

    Somebody definitely hacked our connection. Charter has the record of the downloads. The latest illegal file was the movie "Saw2."

    Apple Tech Support told me that Apple doesn't have any anit-virus software because the Macs are very secure, but he recommend that I try:

    -- Norton Anti-Virus
    -- iAnti-Virus
  • vja4Him Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    {quote:title=KJK555 wrote:}
    They probably "borrowed" your wireless connection.

    They probably "borrowed" your wireless connection. {quote}

    Obviously somebody is hacking our Internet connection ....

    I wonder why D-Links refused to help me set up our router with an extra level of security (as recommended by Charter). The Charter Tech Support told me that I need a second level of security having something to do with MAC ID Filtering ...
  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (46,680 points)
    For starters I would not use the recommended software. It will only cause you more problems not less.

    As far as Peer-to-Peer goes, I wasn't suggesting that as a solution but a possible cause of the problem. If you don't have any Peer-to-Peer clients installed that forget about that as a possible cause of the problem.

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    |___________________

    Allan
    tiger

    ___________________
  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (60,520 points)
    Google for "torrents"

    Comodore came out with free AV for Mac (beta) but Norton is worse than the cure.

    LittleSnitch can tell you and block outbound.

    Log into and configure your modem and router, or upgrade to a model that has better security features for WPA and wired connections. Encrypted and password protected too.

    On my modem, there is ability to limit, and to collect statistics daily, month etc of outbound and downloaded.

    Also look to see if anything is using hidden folders and larger than normal.

    Most of the threads and past discussions, false alarm, not that yours isn't real.
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,800 points)
    If you mean that somebody hacked into your wireless router, that has absolutely nothing to do with your Mac. It happened because you chose a weak network password, the password was leaked, or you used a weak encryption standard (WEP). Installing anti-virus software on a client will have no effect on this problem.

    Secure your wireless network with WPA2 Personal or Enterprise (in the latter case, you'll need a RADIUS server.) Use a network password of at least 20 random characters -- upper and lower case letters, numbers, and punctuation. Don't give the password to anyone but the administrator of each client.
  • Daveonator Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Basically agreeing with Linc. As a security professor the root of your problems as you described it via Charter has nothing to do with your Mac. I would also highly recommend WPA2 as opposed to WEP or WPA as again recommended by Linc.

    Here's a guide for a DLINK router on countermeasures that can keep the attackers at bay:
    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-increase-security-by-securing-your-d-link-wi reless-router/

    Hope that helps. You need to get this under control because I know of someone that got busted for child **** because someone was riding off their Internet connection. Legally you are responsible for others downloading stuff from your connection.

    Another thing you can do is turn off your router when you're not using it, that is in addition to changing your password (regularly) for WPA2, changing the SSID, and other things named in that document.

    I know some people recommend it, but I wouldn't bother with turning off DHCP or using MAC address filtering because that is easy to fool by someone that knows better. I know a lot of people recommend this, but it's weak security at best.
  • Russa Level 4 Level 4 (1,315 points)
    A hardware firewall is important.. you might want to set a secure wireless WPA2 password.. I use Intego VirusBarrrier x6 that includes Internet security software as well.

    If you can, you might want to physically trace your cable connection until it goes into the ground to see if anyone has tapped into it with the splitter.
  • vja4Him Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    After several calls to D-Links tech support, finally got someone to help me set up a Mac ID for our three computers. We were having trouble because at the same time I was trying to configure our router, Charter's Internet connection went down!

    I don't know how to use my son's Window's machine (I'm Mac only, and recently learning Android on my Archos 70 IT 250GB).

    The tech also suggested that we disconnect our ethernet cables when we are not using our computers. So, we'll be using that strategy as well.
  • vja4Him Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Finally have my router settings figured out. I have to keep the SSID visible though, because my tablet cannot connect with the SSID hidden.